CONF: Teleology in the Ancient World

TELEOLOGY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD
The Dispensation of Nature

The University of Exeter, 8-11 July, 2009
Organisers: Dr. Julius Rocca and Prof. Christopher Gill

An international conference on how teleological arguments were used in medicine and philosophy in antiquity, and how these arguments have continued to inform and influence current debate on evolution, creationism, and intelligent design. As well as examining philosophical contributions to the subject, especially Platonic and Aristotelian, a special aim of the conference is to show how ancient medical thinking on this topic relates to ancient philosophical ideas. Examining teleological methodologies in ancient medical thought from Hippocrates to Galen will offer a critical evaluation on the place of teleology within medical science, its cultural contexts, its account of human development, and teleological responses to competing explanatory theories of human structure and function.

Keynote speaker, Professor David Sedley, University of Cambridge: “Socrates’ place in the history of teleology.”

Other speakers: Elizabeth Craik, University of St. Andrews; John Dillon, Trinity College, Dublin; Rebecca Flemming, University of Cambridge; R. J. Hankinson, The University of Texas at Austin; M.R. Johnson, University of California, San Diego; Mariska Leunissen, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; Staffan Müller-Wille, University of Exeter: Jan Opsomer, University of Cologne; Mark Schiefsky, Harvard University; Samuel Scolnicov, Hebrew University of Jerusalem; R.W. Sharples, University College London; Harold Tarrant, University of Newcastle, Australia; Philip van der Eijk, University of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Accommodation in en-suite rooms in the University’s newest hall of residence overlooking the Exe valley and near the main conference venue: accommodation and all meals during conference: £240; conference fee £30 (£15 for students); daily rates also available.
Bookings, with accommodation: by end of May 2009 (booking period extended)
Without accommodation: by June 14 2009.
For booking form, contact Prof. C. J. Gill
Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Exeter,
Amory Building, Rennes Drive,
Exeter, EX4 4RJ, UK
C.J.Gill AT exeter.ac.uk

Student bursaries available to cover all accommodation and meal costs and conference fee. Contact Prof. Gill if interested.

CONF: Kyknos Seminars (etc.)

KYKNOS: THE SWANSEA, LAMPETER, AND EXETER CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON THE NARRATIVE LITERATURES OF THE ANCIENT WORLD

Below is given the KYKNOS programme for Easter term 2009. For more information about the various activities of the research centre, please visit our website (www.kyknos.org.uk) or contact Professor John Morgan (John.Morgan AT swansea.ac.uk) or Dr Magdalena Öhrman (m.ohrman AT lamp.ac.uk).

Research seminar series

Friday 8 May: Dr Regine May (University of Leeds), ‘An Ass from Oxyrhynchus: P.Oxy.LXX.4762 and Apuleius Metamorphoses. A New Fragment’, Swansea University, Keir Hardie, Room 130, 6.00pm

Thursday 14 May: Nora Goldschmidt (Magdalen College, Oxford University), ‘Virgil, Ennius, and the Site of Rome’, University of Wales, Lampeter, Roderick Bowen Research Centre, 6.00pm

Friday 15 May, Jane McLarty (Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge University), ‘Sense and sensibility: class, gender and emotion in the Acts of Paul and Thekla’, Swansea University, Keir Hardie, Room 130, 6.00pm

Wednesday 27 May: Dr Johanna Akurjärvi (Lund University), ‘Narrating Athens: Genres in Pausanias’ Attika’, University of Wales, Lampeter, Roderick Bowen Research Centre, 6.00pm (Regulars please note the Wednesday date!)

Thursday 4 June: Dr Koen de Temmerman (Ghent University), ‘Less than ideal paradigms in the ancient Greek novel’, University of Wales, Lampeter, Roderick Bowen Research Centre, 6.00pm

KYKNOS Reading Group

A fortnightly KYKNOS reading group is held at Swansea University. For more information please contact Professor John Morgan.

Conferences:

Workshop on ‘The narrative of Hymns’, University of Wales, Lampeter, 9-10 May. The organisers are still able to accept late bookings – but please be in touch as soon as possible. Further details here: http://www.lamp.ac.uk/ric/conferences/narative_in_hymns.html

Conference on ‘The Erotics of Narrative’, Gregynog, nr Newtown, Powys, 15–17 July

CONF: Re-Inventing Athens after Loraux

Re-Inventing Athens after Loraux: A Workshop on the Funeral Oration
Organisers: Julia L. Shear and Ian Ruffell

Saturday 27 June, 10 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.
Department of Classics
65 Oakfield Avenue
University of Glasgow

Originally published in 1981, Nicole Loraux’s book L’invention d’Athènes:
histoire de l’oraison funèbre dans la “cité classique” quickly became the
main port of call for any research on funeral orations; an English
translation soon appeared in 1986 as The Invention of Athens: The Funeral
Oration in the Classical City (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press).
Twenty-eight years later, this book has become a central plank in current
constructions of Athenian ideology and identity and it has widely influenced
studies of Athenian culture, literature and art. In this one-day workshop,
we seek to re-evaluate Loraux’s work by re-examining the funeral speeches in
their own right and reassessing what they can tell us about the social and
political construction of Athens.

Programme

10.00-10.30 coffee available

10.30-10.40 Julia L. Shear: welcome

10.40-11.50 Ian Ruffell: ‘The Ephitaphios as Agon’

11.50-1.00 Jon Hesk: ‘Loraux, Hypereides, and the Problem of
Difference’

1.00-2.00 lunch

2.00-3.10 Alex Long: ‘Flattery and Socratic Politics in
Plato’s Menexenus’

3.10-3.40 tea

3.40-4.50 Julia L. Shear: ‘The Epitaphios and the Construction
of the Past’

4.50-5.00 Ian Ruffell: summary

pub and dinner in a local restaurant

Since one of our main aims is to promote discussion of the funeral orations,
there will be plenty of time scheduled during the day for informal
round-table discussion. All are most welcome join us. Lunch will be
provided, but it will be helpful to have an idea of numbers for catering.
For further details and to let us that you will be attending, please contact
the organisers: Julia L. Shear (j.shear AT classics.arts.gla.ac.uk) or Ian
Ruffell (i.ruffell ATclassics.arts.gla.ac.uk). We look forward to seeing you
at our workshop.

A poster is available to download at:
http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_117326_en.pdf (colour) or
http://www.gla.ac.uk/media/media_117325_en.pdf (black and white)

CONF: Greek Archaeology Group Seminars

Trinity term programme

Tuesday lunchtimes (1 pm) weeks: 2 – 5
Oxford, Institute of Archaeology, Beaumont St.,
Lecture Room

*Week 2 (5 May) – Thomas Kiely (British Museum)

Re-excavating Kourion, Cyprus. The British Museum Cyprus Digitisation Project

*Week 3 (12 May) – Peter Haarer (Oxford)

Alphabets and Iron

Week 4 (19 May) – Nicoletta Momigliano (Bristol)

No sex please, we’re Minoan

Week 5 (26 May) – Francois Leclere (British Museum)

The British Museum Project at Tell Dafana/Daphnae (Egypt, Eastern Delta)

Sponsored by the School of Archaeology and the Classics Faculty, Oxford.

CONF: Leeds International Classics Seminar

This is a reminder that the Leeds International Classical Seminar for 2009 on the subject of ‘Public images in Augustan Rome’ will take place on Friday May 15th.

Those planning to attend should notify Penny Goodman (p.j.goodman AT leeds.ac.uk) BY FRIDAY MAY 8TH in order to secure lunch. The conference fee, which includes tea / coffee and a buffet lunch, is £15 (or £10 for students and unwaged), payable on the day.

A full programme of papers follows below.

Programme for LICS 2009, ‘Public images in Augustan Rome':

10.30 – 11.30: Registration in the Department of Classics
(1st Floor, Parkinson Building, University of Leeds)

11.30 onwards: Papers in Seminar Rooms 3 and 4 of the Leeds Humanities Research Institute (LHRI)
(29-31 Clarendon Place)

11.30 – 12.15: Diana Spencer (University of Birmingham)
Towards a new (space) syntax: Varro’s de Lingua Latina
12.15 – 13.00: Stephen Harrison (Corpus Christi, Oxford)
Horace and Augustan monuments

13.00 – 14.00: Lunch
(Room 119, Dept. of Classics, 1st Floor Parkinson Building)

14.00 – 14.45: Stratis Kyriakidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)
Rome and the fata Asiae, (Manilius, 1.512)
14.45 – 15.30: Andrew Zissos (University of California, Irvine)
Terra sub Augusto est: Augustan Rome and Ovid’s Metamorphoses

15.30 – 16.00: Coffee (in LHRI)

16.00 – 16.45: Amanda Claridge (Royal Holloway, University of London)
Augustus’ house on the Palatine
16.45 – 17.30: Alison Cooley (University of Warwick)
Contextualising Augustus’ Res Gestae

CONF: Durham Seminars

SEMINAR PROGRAM, EASTER TERM 2009
Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Durham

Tuesday 28 April; 5.30pm [Ritson room, NB replaces Anc. Phil. Reading
Group]
Mr Jonathan Broyles (Edinburgh)
Plato’s Apology and the uniqueness of Socrates

Wednesday 29 April, 5.30pm [Ritson room]
Dr Alexei Zadorozhnyy (Liverpool)
Platonic writtenness and orality in Plutarch’s Life of Dion

Wednesday 6 May [Ritson room]
Professor Walter Cavini (Bologna)
Knowledge or Science? Episteme in Plato’s Theaetetus and Aristotle’s
Posterior Analytics

Friday 8 May, 5.30pm [venue: University of Newcastle) [Classical
Association & Roman Society]
Dr Caroline Humfress (Birkbeck College, London)
Telling stories about Roman law

Wednesday 13 May, 5.30pm [Ritson room]
Dr Annemarie Ambuehl (Groningen)
Talking (about) Heracles: Narrative strategies in Hellenistic ‘epyllion’

Wednesday 20 May, 5.30pm [Ritson room]
Dr Anna Clark (Christ Church, Oxford)
Thinking about gods in Pompeii

Friday 22 May, 5.30pm [Ritson room]
Dr Chloe Balla (University of Crete, Rethymno)
On the origins of social contract theory: Plato and the Sophists

Wednesday 27 May, 5.30pm [Ritson room]
Professor Jannis Mylonopoulos (Columbia University, New York)
Nothing to do with Odysseus? Terracotta figurines from Ithaca and the
reinvention of epic traditions

This Day in Ancient History

ante diem v idus maias

Lemuria (day 2) — a private and public appeasement of the dead; the Roman paterfamilias would rise at midnight to conduct a ritual involving beans and bronze

rites in honour of Mania – a Roman divinity who was considered the goddess of the dead; she was also the mother of the Lares

14 A.D. — Augustus’ last official census comes to an end

330 — Constantine renames Byzantium and makes it his capital

1988 — death of E.T. Salmon (Samnium and the Samnites)