26th Fox Classics Lecture at Monmouth

Timothy J. Moore, professor of classics at the University of Texas, will deliver Monmouth College’s 26th annual Bernice L. Fox Classics Lecture on March 1 at 7:30 p.m. in the Wells Theater.

Titled “Musical Comedy: Roman and American,” the lecture is free and open to the public.

Moore will propose that for all their differences, the musical comedies of ancient Rome and contemporary America are remarkably similar in many ways. The comedies of the Roman playwrights Plautus and Terence, like the musical comedies of contemporary America, mixed spoken dialogue with songs.

“We can therefore learn much about Roman comedy, the American musical and the nature of musical theater by comparing how the two genres approach various aspects of the form,” he said.

“The Roman plays, like their modern descendents, use music to distinguish characters, mark the progress of love affairs, and reinforce emotional and humorous moments. At the same time, differences in the musical structures and tone of the two genres reflect changing notions of how music and drama should work together.”

more …

via Musical comedy the topic of MC’s 26th Fox Classics Lecture – Monmouth, IL | Daily Review Atlas.

CONF: Justice in the Greek and Roman World

Seen in the Canadian Classical Bulletin (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

JUSTICE IN THE ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD
The University of Western Ontario, Mar 5th-7th, 2010
This conference seeks to bring together scholars from around North America to present papers on aspects of law or justice in Greek or Roman antiquity. More specifically, the conference will address some of the following concerns: how a demand for justice was articulated and implemented in ancient civilizations; the nature of human or divine justice in Greek or Roman myth and literature; the function of law in ancient society; the rules, procedures, and institutions of Greek or Roman law; ancient philosophers on law or justice; and the influence of social norms and political and cultural traditions on law. The speakers draw together such diverse topics as philosophy, drama, the ancient city, and visual culture under the larger heading of law and justice.
To register: www.uwo.ca/classics/justice_conference
Queries: Kelly Olson at kolson2 AT uwo.ca

PROGRAMME:
FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 2010:

Session 1. Justice in Greek Poetry I: 1:00 -3:00 PM
A. Dr. Judith Fletcher (Wilfrid Laurier University): Avian Justice: Arbitration and Judgment in Aristophanes’ Birds
B. Dr. Victoria Wohl (Univ. of Toronto): The Justice of Lamentation in Euripides’ Hecuba
C. Dr. Christopher G. Brown (Univ. of Western Ontario): Paying the Penalty: Justice in This World and the Next
(coffee break- 3:00- 3:30 PM)
Session 2. Aristotle: 3:30- 5:00 PM
A. Dr. David Mirhady (Simon Fraser University): Justice the True and the Beneficial
B. Dr. Chi Carmody (Univ. of Western Ontario): Justice Then and Now: A Modern Reading of Aristotle’s Corrective/Distributive Distinction

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010:
Session 1: Justice in Greek Poetry II: 9:00 – 11:30 AM
A. Dr. Roger Fisher (York University) Antigone Rests Her Case (Ant. 904-20)
B. Dr. Rebecca Kennedy (Denison University, OH): A Culture of Justice: The Courts in Athenian Tragedy and the Visual Arts
C. Dr. Cynthia Patterson (Emory University): The Justice of Athena: Aeschylus’ Eumenides and the Athenian Courts
(coffee break, 10:30-11:00 AM)
(lunch, 11:30-12:30 PM)
Session 2: Law in Ancient Rome I: 12:30-3:00 PM
A. Dr. Thomas A. J. McGinn (Vanderbilt University): Was Justice Delayed Justice Denied For the Romans?
B. Dr. Andrew Riggsby (Univ. of Texas at Austin): Cicero’s Ambivalence Towards the Criminal Courts
C. Eloise LeMay ((Univ. of Western Ontario): The Republican interrex and its application of imperium
D. Dr. James T. Chlup (Univ. of Manitoba): Just War in Onasander’s Strategikos
(3:00 -3:30 PM coffee break)
Session 3. Law in Ancient Greece I: 3:30 -5:00 PM
A. Dr. Michael Gagarin (Univ. of Texas at Austin): Law and Justice in Classical Athens
B. Dr. Sarah Bolmarcich (Trinity University, Texas): Justice in Greek International Relations
C. Dr. Robert Wallace (Northwestern University): Justice and Community in Democratic Athens

SUNDAY, MARCH 7, 2010
Session 1: Law in Ancient Greece II: 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM
A. Dr. Alex Gottesman (Temple University): Competing Visions of Justice and Community in [Lysias] 6 and Andokides 1
B. Dr. N. Popov-Reynolds (Florida Gulf Coast University): A History of Violence: Discussions of Violence Within the Army in Athenian Lawsuits
C. Carrie L. Galsworthy (Miami University): The Magicians’ Contributions to a Just World
(coffee break, 10:30-11:00 AM)
(lunch, 12:00 – 1:00 PM)
Session 2: Law in Ancient Rome II: 1:00- 3:00 PM
A. Kathryn Balsley (Stanford University): Performances of Justice in Imperial Latin Literature
B. Dr. Leanne Bablitz (Univ. of British Columbia): Babatha’s Legal Experience
C. Dr. Michael P. Fronda (McGill University): Q. and M. Minucius Rufus in Genoa: Arbitration and the Performance of Roman Power
(coffee break, 3:00-3:30)

Recent Finds from Knossos

As my one son works on a high school paper about Knossos, it’s interesting that they still find things there:

Geophysical studies at Kefala Hill in the Knossos archaeological site on Crete island, have revealed findings of the most ancient farm houses in Greece, and perhaps in all of Europe, dating back between 7,000- 6,400 BC.

The important finds were presented on Wednesday in Athens by the head of the British School in Athens and university professor Catherine Morgan at the school’s open annual meeting held at the Archaeological Society building.

The British school, in cooperation with Dutch scientists, have been conducting studies in the Knossos area since May 2009 for the charting and imaging of the archaeological and geological deposits with the use of state-of-the-art radars.

Moreover, Morgan presented an annual review of the British School on the research progress on Keros island in the Cyclades complex, and especially at the Daskalio early Bronze Age settlement, at Kavos on the Ionian island of Corfu, in Thessaly region and on the islands of Kythera and Antikythera.

via Important archaeological finds at Knossos | ANA.

Roman Soldier’s Hoard?

Not quite sure of the ‘military’ claim here:

A hoard of 208 coins found in a Suffolk field could have belonged to a retired Roman soldier. The collection of silver denarii coins was discovered in an undisclosed area of north Suffolk last spring, an inquest heard. Greater Suffolk Coroner Peter Dean determined the find to be treasure because of the age and silver composition of the coins. Judith Plouviez, archaeological officer for the Conservation Team at Suffolk County Council, told the coroner that the coins covered a period between the 1st Century BC and the 1st Century AD of the Roman Empire. She also explained that the collection of coins spanned across a number of Roman emperors, including Nero, Vespasian, Domitianus and Claudius. Speaking after the inquest, Ms Plouviez said: “There have been a number of finds in the area due to the amount of people living and working here during that time. “Due to the wealth of coins found in such a small patch, the owner must have been someone who was relatively well-to-do. “It is very possible that the coins belonged to a retired soldier, as the Roman army was paid in silver coins. “This is why so many coins can be found scattered around.” A further inquest at Ipswich Magistrates’ Court also revealed a gold Roman finger-ring to be treasure. The ring was also found in a north Suffolk field. All of the treasure will now be put forward to the Treasure Valuation Committee, organised independently by the British Museum, where the value of each lot will be established.

via Coins found in field could have belonged to Roman soldier | Advertiser 24.

CFP: Religion and Identity in the Ancient World

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

Postgraduate workshop on Religion and Identity in the Ancient World, 22nd-

23rd April 2010 Durham University

This postgraduate workshop, hosted by Durham University’s Centre for the
Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Near East (CAMNE) on 22nd –
23rd April 2010 in Durham University’s Theology department, will explore
the extent to which religion influenced identity in the ancient world. The
aim is to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion of the issue: we
therefore invite contributions from theologians, classicists and
archaeologists, and indeed anyone else with an interest in religion and
identity in the ancient world.

The construction of an identity is influenced by many factors: linguistic,
cultural, geographical, political and historical, amongst others. In
today’s world, religion is a defining factor in the identities of
millions. Even in self-consciously secular societies, the remnants of
religious influence can still be seen in political and architectural
landscapes. From towering cathedrals and mosques to the horse and cart of
the Amish, there are many ways in which religion can influence identity.
The same diversity is also found throughout the ancient world.

Heads of state from the Egyptian Pharaoh to the Roman Emperor were not
merely political figures, but also occupied pivotal roles in state
religions, and were therefore fundamental in the religious identities of
their subjects. However, such figures existed alongside much more personal
and local beliefs which had an equally powerful influence on the religious
identities of individuals. The story of Israel on the other hand, while
equally varied, is of a nation whose ‘head of state’ is not an earthly
figure, but God himself. Differently again, early Christianity quickly cut
across social, ethnic and political boundaries by offering a new identity
through relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you would like to present a paper, please submit a short abstract of
ca. 150 words detailing your topic to p.j.alpass AT dur.ac.uk by Monday 8th
March. Contributors will be invited to include their papers in an
electronic volume of the workshop proceedings. There are some grants
available towards the cost of transport, and accommodation is provided for
those coming from UK institutions.

THE ORGANISERS
Peter Alpass, Ed Kaneen and Donald Murray

A Bust in Lebanon Nets a Sarcophagus

No photos, alas …

The Lebanese Antiquities Department received on Monday a rare sarcophagus and other antique items confiscated from the house of a sheikh in Baalbek.

The judicial police found the antiquities last Wednesday at the house of Sheikh Mohammad Jaafar Suleiman al-Mohajer, who was believed to have dug them out illegally and kept them secret hoping to sell them.

The items included a sarcophagus dating back to the Roman era in the second century AD and two carved stones, one showing the head of a lion and another showing the portrait of an emperor. The sarcophagus is believed to be of great importance because it might be that of a child from a royal family and it is to be soon displayed at the Lebanese National Museum.

However, according to an article published Tuesday by the Arabic-language newspaper An-Nahar, Mohajer claimed that he had previously contacted the department about the discovery but that the latter had failed to recover the items.

Mohajer said he found the antiques on a property he owned and had sent a letter to the Culture Ministry asking them to buy the items.

Nonetheless, the department insisted it was informed of the discovery before receiving Mohajer’s letters, security sources told An-Nahar. It had launched an investigation in the matter because the items were not reported within the legal deadline of 24 hours and they were dug illegally on the property of Hajj Haydar al-Mohajer.

Furthermore, the judicial police arrested on February 2 two men suspected of fraud, who confessed that Mohajer’s son, Ali Ammar, had tried to sell them antique jewelry items for $1.7 million.

The police raided Mohajer’s house last Wednesday and found the sarcophagus in his back yard along with two other antiques. But they did not go inside the house where antique jewelry might be hidden, noting that the sarcophagus was found empty while the dead were traditionally buried with all their jewelry.

via Antiquities Department receives rare sacrophagus | The Daily Star.

Restoring Jupiter

Interesting item:

IT IS almost 2,000 years old and was thought to have been lost forever, but now an ancient Roman bust is being preserved for future generations.

Conservationists have begun the painstaking process of restoring a marble carving of the Roman god Jupiter which has been rediscovered at Fountains Abbey, near Ripon.

The piece has been identified as part of the celebrated collection of the Earl of Arundel’s collection of antiquities from the classical world and is now being analysed by English Heritage at its archaeological store in Helmsley.

Susan Harrison, English Heritage Curator, said: “The condition of the bust is pretty good, but it does need cleaning and further research. Because it’s mentioned in 17th Century records, experts knew it existed, but they have searched for it in vain amongst the world’s collections of antiquities.

“But here it was all along, safe and sound and waiting to be rediscovered. We plan to do further work to determine the type of marble which will give us an indication of where in the Roman world it is originally from. It really is an impressive piece.”

According to Roman mythology, Jupiter was the most powerful of all the Gods and the Latin depiction of the Greek, God Zeus.

A short little video report accompanies the original article.

via Conservationists begin restoration of Roman bust of Jupiter | York Press.