CONF: Registration Open for Classics & Class

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

The Centre for the Reception of Greece & Rome at Royal Holloway is delighted

to announce that registration is now open for its British Academy-sponsored
conference, ‘Classics & Class’, to be held at the British Academy, 10
Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH, on July 1st and 2nd 2010. This is a
change from the previously advertised venue of Bedford Square. Speakers
include Jonathan Rose (Keynote, Author of The Intellectual Life of the
British Working Classes), Chris Stray, Ed Richardson, Ekaterina Basargina,
Adam Roberts, John Holford, Peter Rose, Paula James, Annie Ravenhill, Graham
Oliver, Robert Crawford, Sarah Butler, Richard Alston, Margaret Malamud, and
Katharine T. von Stackelberg. In addition, there will be a Performance Event
on the evening of July 1st with poetry and prose looking at the history of
Classics through the prism of social class, featuring Tony Harrison and
chaired by Peggy Reynolds (BBC’s Adventures in Poetry). Separate
registration for both the conference and the event (both of which are
entirely free of charge and open to the public) is now open online at
http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2010/classicsandclass/index.cfm. Places for
attendees other than speakers and chairpersons are limited to 60, and will
be offered on a firmly first-come first-serve basis. For further information
please contact edith.hall AT rhul.ac.uk.

Roman and Byzantine Graveyards Near Damascus

From SANA (this one’s making the rounds; Adrian Murdoch e.g. has already noted it):

Damascus Countryside Governorate announced Tuesday the unearthing of 5 archaeological graveyards in old Daryya City near Damascus, dating back to the 3rd and 4th Century AD.

The discovered graveyards, mostly dating back to the Roman and Byzantine era, contain tens of skulls, Mahmoud Hamoud, Damascus Countryside Archeology director said in a statement to SANA.

Hamoud disclosed that some other findings were also found as part of burial materials, including clay and glass tools, bracelets, rings, ring-bells, beads, eardrops, made of bronze, iron, glass, wood, and precious stones, as well as eardrops made of gold.

The discovered graveyards, mostly dating back to the Roman and Byzantine era, contain tens of skulls, Mahmoud Hamoud, Damascus Countryside Archeology director said in a statement to SANA.

Hamoud disclosed that some other findings were also found as part of burial materials, including clay and glass tools, bracelets, rings, ring-bells, beads, eardrops, made of bronze, iron, glass, wood, and precious stones, as well as eardrops made of gold.

The discovered graveyards, mostly dating back to the Roman and Byzantine era, contain tens of skulls, Mahmoud Hamoud, Damascus Countryside Archeology director said in a statement to SANA.

Hamoud disclosed that some other findings were also found as part of burial materials, including clay and glass tools, bracelets, rings, ring-bells, beads, eardrops, made of bronze, iron, glass, wood, and precious stones, as well as eardrops made of gold.

Earlier, Damascus Countryside Archeology Directorate announced the finding of a basalt-built mass graveyard in ‘Ashrafiat Sihnaya’, dating back to same period, with several skulls and other burial materials, made of glass, wood, and metal.

… it continues with some touristy stuff …

via Roman and Byzantine Graveyards Unearthed near Damascus SANA , Syria.

See also:

JOB: Roman Archaeology @ Missouri

(please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

Visiting Assistant Professor Roman Archaeology

The Department of Art History and Archaeology at the University of Missouri
seeks a visiting assistant professor to teach courses in Roman art and
archaeology. This is a fulltime,non-tenure track position from August 2010
to May 2011. The position is responsible for six courses (3/3), including an
introductory survey of Roman art and archaeology and undergraduate and
graduate-level Roman courses in a variety of topics. A PhD is required for
appointment at this rank, but advanced ABD applicants also will be
considered at a different rank. Teaching experience is preferred.

The department offers the BA, MA, and PhD degrees in classical archaeology
and art history. There are normally about 80 undergraduate majors and 25
graduate students. Graduate degrees in art history and archaeology can be
combined with interdisciplinary minors in Ancient Studies, Medieval and
Renaissance Studies, and Women零 and Gender Studies. The University of
Missouri is the main campus of the state university system and offers a
broad range of undergraduate and graduate programs. Please send letter of
application, curriculum vitae, and contact information for three references
to:

Anne Rudloff Stanton, Chair
Department of Art History and Archaeology
109 Pickard Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211

Application review starts March 15, 2010, and will continue until the
position is filled. For more information see the department website at
http://aha.missouri.edu. The University of Missouri-Columbia is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action/ADA Employer.

CFP: Animals in the Ancient World

Seen on Aegeanet (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

The Beast Within (and Without)
Animals in the Ancient World
Graduate Colloquium at the University of Madison, WI, October 1-2

Ever since rational animals began to record their thoughts, they have
portrayed the creatures around them as friend, foe or food. Since that
time, the defining line between man and beast has preoccupied artists and
authors. While some, such as Pliny and Aristotle, have taken a scientific
approach to describing animal behavior, others have chosen a more artistic
path, using animals as a way to think about humans or vice versa.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

€ Depictions of tame, wild or mythological animals in art or literature
€ Encounters between man and animal in the hunt, in the house or in the
arena
€ Metamorphoses, whether brought on by the gods, by natural forces or by
magic
€ Bestial behavior displayed by humans (or humane behavior by beasts)

These are only a few examples, and are not meant to exhaust the possible
topics that would fit under our theme. We welcome papers from any
discipline (history, philology, philosophy, material culture, etc.) and any
era of the Greco-Roman world. The keynote address will be delivered by Mark
Payne, Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Chicago.

Graduate students wishing to present a paper at the colloquium should submit
a titled abstract of 300 words or less to UWClassics.colloquium AT gmail.com by
April 30, 2010. Name, the title of the paper, email address, institution,
city, state, and country should be included on a separate page sent with the
abstract. Notifications will be sent around the end of May.

Questions about
the colloquium should be directed to Lisa Feldkamp, lfeldkamp AT wisc.edu.

Finds from Aiane, Kozani

Another tantalizingly brief/borderline vague item from ANA:

Rare finds, among them the architectural ruins of tombs, pottery and clay statuettes, were brought to light during archeological excavations conducted at the Royal Necropolis in the region of Livadia, near the village of Aiane in the prefecture of Kozani, northwestern Greece.

The land of Aiane is rich in unique and rare archaeological finds, according to the head of the 30th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities in charge of the excavations, referring to recent discoveries that include 25 tombs dating back to the Archaic and Classical Period and 4 tombs of the late Bronze Age.

The latest finds will be presented in the 23rd Scientific Meeting on the Archaeological Work in Macedonia and Thrace to be held at Thessaloniki Aristotle University (AUTH) on Thursday.

via Archaeologists unearth rare finds in Aiane, Kozani | ANA.

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem vi idus martias

ante diem vi idus martias