JOB: Generalist @ Rutgers (one year)

Seen on Classics (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY-NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ

The Department of Classics of Rutgers University-New Brunswick is
seeking to fill a one-year (possibly renewable for an additional year)
position for the 2010-2011 academic year, pending final budgetary
approval. The area of specialization is open, but we hope to complement
existing faculty strengths, and a focus on Latin Literature of the
Empire would be welcome. Applicants should have a record of outstanding
teaching and show strong scholarly potential. The teaching assignments
may include a range of undergraduate and graduate courses, including
Greek or Latin language and literature courses and Classical
Civilization courses. The teaching load will be three courses per
semester. Applicants should have Ph.D. in hand by December 2010.

Review of applications will begin on May 31, 2010. To apply for this
position, please have a cover letter, CV, writing sample, and three
letters of recommendation to arrive by June 15, 2010 c/o Professor Azzan
Yadin, Rutgers University Department of Classics, Ruth Adams Building
002, 131 George Street, New Brunswick NJ 08901. Rutgers University is
an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.

On the Popularity of Sword and Sandal Flicks

Some observations from an item in the Telegraph:

“Clash of the Titans and How to Train Your Dragon represent worlds that are far from our own and an escape from job insecurity, debates about health care and worrying about paying the bills,” he said. “What better way to do this than to take yourself off to a totally different place at the movies?”

But while the themes are escapist, the content is also familiar – Greeks, Romans and Vikings and assorted serpents and dragons.

“That makes for good comfort movies dealing with characters and stories with which they are familiar,” said Mr Contrino. “People want to get away from reality with these movies, but nor do they want to be too challenged.”

That such colourful adventure stories are also particularly well-suited to portrayal in 3D is also no coincidence as Hollywood tries to cash in on the game-changing success of James Cameron’s Avatar blockbuster.

There is an added resonance to Americans flocking to films set during the rise and fall of ancient empires as they contemplate their own long-dominant place in the world amid economic upheavals at home and protracted wars abroad.

via Hollywood turns to ancient warriors and legends to win audiences – Telegraph.

… in case you’re not aware, I’m regularly posting any interesting reviews of sword and sandal flicks on my Twitterfeed … there are links to them in one of the sidebars at the right (near the bottom of the column) …

Bonham’s Upcoming Auction

Bonham’s also has some interesting items in its upcoming antiquities auction … first thing which caught my eye was this portrait bust of Menander:

Bonham's photo

An interesting togatus … clearly not a garment I’d be comfortable wearing:

Bonham's photo

An anadyomene Aphrodite:

Bonham's photo

Not sure how this is identified as a female athlete (4th/3rd century Etruscan):

Bonham's Photo

A Roman Janus head flask (I’ve never seen one of these):

Bonham's photo

Christie’s Upcoming Auction

Some of the interesting items in Christie’s upcoming antiquities auction include this torso of Aphrodite (from a 19th century Swiss collection) (the inline links will take you to the ‘official page’):

Christie's photo

A very interesting ‘young satyr’ with a panther at his feet (acquired pre-1970):

Christies photo

A bone figure of Aphrodite (left) and a doll (right) (acquired in the 1960s):

Christie's photo

There are 80+ other items … an awful lot of ‘satyrs’

Citanda: American Journal of Philology 131.1 (Spring 2010)

  • Middle Comedy and the “Satyric” Style – Carl A. Shaw
  • Menander’s Theophoroumene between Greece and Rome – Sebastiana Nervegna
  • The Tyrant Lists: Tacitus’ Obituary of Petronius – Holly Haynes
  • Unseemly Professions and Recruitment in Late Antiquity: Piscatores and Vegetius Epitoma 1.7.1-2 – Michael B. Charles
  • Reconsidering the History of Latin and Sabellic Adpositional Morphosyntax – Benjamin W. Fortson IV

via Project MUSE – American Journal of Philology – Volume 131, Number 1 (Whole Number 521), Spring 2010.

Some ‘partial access’ available …