This Day in Ancient History: ante diem v kalendas maias

Edward Gibbon, by Henry Walton (died 1813). Se...

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ante diem v kalendas maias

  • ludi Florales … a.k.a. Floralia (day 1) — a festival originally ordered in response to an interpretation of the Sybilline books in 238 B.C., it fell into desuetude only to be revived in 173 B.C.; it was a general festival of drinking and other merriment in honour of Flora, who presided over (of course) flowers and their blossoms (Chloris is also mentioned … I’m still trying to figure that one out).
  • 4977 B.C. — birth of the universe, according to the calculations of Johannes Kepler
  • 1737 — Birth of Edward Gibbon (he wrote some sort of book apparently)

Finds from Strumica in Eastern Macedonia

No relevant photos, alas:

A unique lamp from the fourth century with the image of Alexander the Great and gold jewellery from the second century BC were discovered by archaeologists in the Tsarevi Kuli area over the town of Strumica in eastern Macedonia.

The new finds discovered at the necropolis of the southern wall of the site confirm the theory that during Antiquity, Strumica was a well-developed trade centre, archaeologist Zoran Ruyak told the national newspaper Vecer today.

The jewellery finds suggest that Strumica , which during the second century BC was called Astraîon, had a well-developed trade center, a rich population and was in communication with the workshops in Thessaloniki and neighbouring towns, especially those of Isar Marvintsi and Vardarki Rid which are also being excavated this year, the archaeologist added.

The fact that the continued development of Strumica was not interrupted is confirmed by the findings dating to the fourth century and the unique light with the likely image of Alexander the Great.

The find is one of the most interesting ones and, as far as archaeologists know so far, it is unique, the arcaheologist told the publication.

There are currently around 100 people working on the Tsarevi Kuli excavations, Vecer noted. The research on the site started about a month and a half ago, and are financed by the government as part of the country’s main archaeological projects.

via Balkan Travellers – Archaeologists Unearth New Finds near Strumica in Eastern Macedonia.

Bust in Sparta

Vague details, as often:

Two local men were arrested on antiquities smuggling charges on Monday in the southern Peloponnese town of Sparta, after authorities discovered a cache of particular valuable objects in the pair’s possession, including a bronze Kouros-like statuette.    Four ancient coins and precious stone weighing in at more than 500 grams were also confiscated.    Additionally, handguns, ammunition and precision scales were uncovered during a search of the men’s residences.

via Antiquities smuggling arrests in Sparta | ANA.

CONF: Liverpool SACE Seminars

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

University of Liverpool

SACE Seminar Series

The School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology is pleased to announce
its research seminar programme for the summer term 2009/10. Seminars take
place at 5 – 6.30 pm in either the Bosanquet Seminar Room, 12 Abercromby
Square (BSR), the Shore Lecture Theatre, 14 Abercromby Square (SLT), or
M202, The Hartley Building. These are buildings 146, 147, and 253 on the
campus map: www.liv.ac.uk/maps.

Everyone is welcome. For further details please contact Shirley Curtis
(shirley.curtis AT liv.ac.uk).

22nd April
Maureen Carroll (University of Sheffield)
Porticus triplex and the sacred grove in Roman temple architecture: an
archaeological case study from Pompeii
(BSR)

27th April
Will Roebroeks (Leiden University)
Ebb and flow of regional extinctions: the character of neanderthal
occupation of northern climes
(M202)

29th April
Mark Molesky (Seton Hall University)
Primitive antiquity and the European imagination, 1850-1940
(BSR)

4th May
Andrew Gardner (University College London)
Violence, order, and Roman military culture
(SLT)

6th May
John Curran (Queen’s University Belfast)
Roman Judaea: the Herodian prism
(BSR)

11th May
Krzysztof Nawotka (University of Wroclaw)
Who wrote the Alexander Romance?
(BSR)

20th May
Francois Leclere (British Museum)
Egyptians and Greeks at the Saite frontier-post of Daphnae (Tell Dafana): a
reassessment
(BSR)

JOB: Hellenist @ Brown University

Seen on various lists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

THE DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS at Brown University has been authorized to announce a search for one-year visiting appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor, to begin July, 2010. This is a non tenure-track position. Full time teaching load is four courses per academic year. The successful candidate should be prepared to teach one or two courses in ancient Greek and Latin (elementary through beginning graduate level), one large lecture course, and one or more smaller discussion courses in translation, and to participate actively in other departmental activities, including advising. Ph.D. by time of appointment is required. Preference will be given to candidates with teaching experience. Salary will be dependent upon candidate’s experience and credentials.

CANDIDATES should send applications by email to:

Classics_Department AT Brown.edu

with the subject line indicating “VAP position” and have letters of reference sent either by email to the same address or by post to Chair, VAP Position, Department of Classics, Box 1856, Brown University, Providence, R.I., 02912-1856.

Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, graduate transcript, and at least three current letters of recommendation; applicants are also encouraged to submit evidence of teaching ability and expertise.

Those who applied in Fall 2009 to our open-rank position for a Hellenist who would like to reactivate their applications for this new position may do so by sending an email to that effect to the address above.

Screening of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Applications received in their entirety by May 15, 2010 are assured full consideration.

Brown University is committed to diversity in its faculty and encourages applications from qualified women and under-represented minority candidates

JOB: Generalist @ Rutgers (one year)

Seen on Classics (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY-NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ

The Department of Classics of Rutgers University-New Brunswick is
seeking to fill a one-year (possibly renewable for an additional year)
position for the 2010-2011 academic year, pending final budgetary
approval. The area of specialization is open, but we hope to complement
existing faculty strengths, and a focus on Latin Literature of the
Empire would be welcome. Applicants should have a record of outstanding
teaching and show strong scholarly potential. The teaching assignments
may include a range of undergraduate and graduate courses, including
Greek or Latin language and literature courses and Classical
Civilization courses. The teaching load will be three courses per
semester. Applicants should have Ph.D. in hand by December 2010.

Review of applications will begin on May 31, 2010. To apply for this
position, please have a cover letter, CV, writing sample, and three
letters of recommendation to arrive by June 15, 2010 c/o Professor Azzan
Yadin, Rutgers University Department of Classics, Ruth Adams Building
002, 131 George Street, New Brunswick NJ 08901. Rutgers University is
an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.