Also Seen: Defeat of Alesia

I think we get a bit of insight into Rupert Murdoch’s mindset when we read things like this:

Nicknamed after Julius Caesar’s victorious siege of Gallic forces in 52 B.C., Rupert Murdoch’s “Project Alesia” was supposed to be his attack against Google News, which he’s always seen as a content-thieving enterprise. [more]

FWIW, almost a year ago the Daily Inquisitr was commenting on the name of the project and warning about the Ides of March … meanwhile, back in September Vanity Fair proclaimed Mark Zuckerberg:

our new Caesar. He rules from the imperial capital of Palo Alto, California, the Rome of our nascent millennium.

Meanwhile the two guys in charge of Research in Motion have also been dubbed Caesars … clearly we need a new Suetonius. We’re clearly shaping up for another year of the four (or more) emperors …

Talking About Ancient Vampires

This sounds like it would have been very interesting to attend:

These days, when an event is billed as vampire related, one might expect the target audience to be mostly made up of adolescent girls.

Not so for the considerable crowd that turned out to the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s Rainey Auditorium on Thursday evening. The program, “Vampires, Demons and Mystical Creatures in the Ancient World,” was organized by Young Friends, a group of active volunteers that seeks to encourage Museum membership and participation among young professionals and students in the 21 through 45-year-old range — though Thursday’s crowd ranged from children to older adults.

The evening began with two speakers who presented on magic and monsters from ancient times. The first, associate professor of Classical Studies Peter Struck, spoke about the prevalence of magic in ancient Greece — and, indeed, throughout the ancient world.

“In Greece, everyone used magic, and believed it worked,” Struck said. The most prevalent method, he explained, was to “enlist the untimely dead” — young people who died early, violent deaths — to do one’s bidding by dropping spells into their graves.

Struck was followed by Jennifer Wegner, the associate curator of the Egyptian section and a regular of Young Friends programs, who spoke about the variety of ancient Egyptian deities and monsters.

“Animal life alone in Egypt is the stuff of nightmares,” Wegner said. But the deities that these creatures represented were “viewed as positive” in Egyptian culture.

Both speakers were very well received.

“I thought it was really interesting, both were really good speakers,” said Becky Kolacki, a student from Drexel who, though not a member of Young Friends, said that she would definitely consider going to future events.

“The Egyptology was really fascinating, and they did a great job picking speakers,” said Stephanie Met, who was there with her father, a Penn professor.

After their presentations, people were given the opportunity to tour the Museums’s “FANG! The Killing Tooth” exhibit on the biology of the canine and the history of vampire myth.

Young Friends hosts two to three major events a year, and members of the group receive discounts on Museum events.

“There’s all this great research going on and great speakers here,” said Emily Goldsleger, the assistant director of membership and annual giving at the Penn Museum and a coordinator of the Young Friends program. “We try and make it more lighthearted and accessible.”These days, when an event is billed as vampire related, one might expect the target audience to be mostly made up of adolescent girls.

Not so for the considerable crowd that turned out to the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s Rainey Auditorium on Thursday evening. The program, “Vampires, Demons and Mystical Creatures in the Ancient World,” was organized by Young Friends, a group of active volunteers that seeks to encourage Museum membership and participation among young professionals and students in the 21 through 45-year-old range — though Thursday’s crowd ranged from children to older adults.

The evening began with two speakers who presented on magic and monsters from ancient times. The first, associate professor of Classical Studies Peter Struck, spoke about the prevalence of magic in ancient Greece — and, indeed, throughout the ancient world.

“In Greece, everyone used magic, and believed it worked,” Struck said. The most prevalent method, he explained, was to “enlist the untimely dead” — young people who died early, violent deaths — to do one’s bidding by dropping spells into their graves.

Struck was followed by Jennifer Wegner, the associate curator of the Egyptian section and a regular of Young Friends programs, who spoke about the variety of ancient Egyptian deities and monsters.

“Animal life alone in Egypt is the stuff of nightmares,” Wegner said. But the deities that these creatures represented were “viewed as positive” in Egyptian culture.

Both speakers were very well received.

“I thought it was really interesting, both were really good speakers,” said Becky Kolacki, a student from Drexel who, though not a member of Young Friends, said that she would definitely consider going to future events.

“The Egyptology was really fascinating, and they did a great job picking speakers,” said Stephanie Met, who was there with her father, a Penn professor.

After their presentations, people were given the opportunity to tour the Museums’s “FANG! The Killing Tooth” exhibit on the biology of the canine and the history of vampire myth. [more]

Felton seems to hang out her shingle for such things every Hallowe’en, so we might read some more from her soon. As folks prepare to regale their kiddies with assorted ghost stories, they might want to check out an interesting interview with Debbie Felton on ‘Spooky Rome’ at eternallycool … N.S. Gill has also put together a few pages of relevant ghost stories from ancient Greece and Rome …. Horror Masters’ page of ancient ghost stories is also interesting (although it really would have been nice if there were footnotes!). Of course, you’ll want to check out some of the purported sightings of ghosts that we have mentioned in these pages, here and here (the latter has links to earlier stories).

Also Seen: Getting a Classical Education in Italy

The Wall Street Journal had an item of interest … an article comparing US and Italian education systems penned by an ‘urban professional’ from the US working in Rome. Here’s the excerpt that caught my eye:

The pedagogy is old-fashioned, with lots of memorization: the despised “rote learning” that American educators have been warning against since before my own distant youth (but which news reports say is making a comeback there). Italian teachers make little effort to cultivate their pupils’ self-esteem or celebrate their precious snowflake-like individuality. Meetings with parents are about what their child does wrong, while whatever he’s learned is passed over in silence.

That can be frustrating for anyone who thrives on what Thomas Mann called “Vitamin P.” Yet no one who has let an excited second-grader drag him through the Musée D’Orsay in search of Impressionist masterpieces, or heard a third-grader give forth on Australopithecus and the Big Bang, or a fourth-grader recite a poem by Sappho, can doubt that Italian teachers are doing something right. With many other countries’ systems having all but abandoned classical languages, the prospect of my son taking five years of Latin and Greek in his teens gives me hope that he will reach adulthood with a sharp mind attuned to the resonances of the past.

via European Life: Getting a Classical Education in Italy – WSJ.com.

… trying to picture a fourth-grader at my school reciting Sappho … can’t do it.

Citanda: Brett Favre and Achilles

Mentioned this on facebook last week … forgot to post it here. Here’s the incipit:

Even though Homer’s Iliad was written approximately three thousand years ago, the character of Achilles is still alive and well. He is forty one years old, lives in Mississippi, and spends his autumns and winters in Minnesota. Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre is the modern-day embodiment of the legendary warrior Achilles.

The first and most obvious trait that the two legends share is that both men are primadonnas whose narcissistic tendencies can become a major annoyance and nearly impossible to deal with. In the case of Favre, he did not want to attend the Vikings’ training camp, and so he simply refused to join the Vikings in 2009, saying he would remain retired from the New York Jets. Midway through camp, Favre had an unsurprising change of heart and decided to play again, for the Vikings. After this decision was made, reports swirled that part of the reason Favre was so unwilling to join the Vikings because he did not want to share a room with any of his teammates. This selfishness is a direct parallel of the character of Achilles.

In Book I of the Iliad, the Greek warriors take two Trojan women, Chryseis and Briseis, to be their concubines, and it turns out that the Greeks’ leader Agamemnon chose Chryseis to be his, but she is the daughter of a priest named Chrysus, who summons the help of the gods to get his daughter back. A plague hits the Greek camp, and Agamemnon gives Chryseis back, but insists on taking Briseis, the woman who Achilles had claimed as his own. This infuriates Achilles, who then stays in his tent and refuses to participate in the war. [more ...]

Aesop in the Florida Debates?

Aesop seems to be a theme today for some reason … here’s the end of an item from the Huffington Post commenting on the Florida senate elections debates:

Thankfully, a commercial break intervened, but immediately afterwards, moderator Antonio Mora, news anchor for host station WFOR-TV, returned to the theme. That’s when Aesop made his cameo appearance.

“In making your run as an Independent, you changed some of the positions you had held as a Republican in the past. In one of Aesop’s fables, he talked about the bats and the beasts and the birds, and how the beasts and the birds were in a fight, and the bat wouldn’t pick a side. In the end, the moral of the story was that he who is neither one thing or another has no friends. Who are you now?”

Crist replied, “I am the same guy I’ve always been…a fiscal conservative and a social moderate,” then pivoted to attack Rubio for wanting to “overturn Roe v. Wade” and “putting…privatization (of Social Security) on the table….I am running against an extreme right wing candidate who believes in taking away women’s rights, punishing seniors…and that’s just not right.”

This is interesting insofar as bats make an appearance in another fable of Aesop … in the Townsend translation (via N.S. Gill):

A BAT who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to be spared his life. The Weasel refused, saying that he was by nature the enemy of all birds. The Bat assured him that he was not a bird, but a mouse, and thus was set free. Shortly afterwards the Bat again fell to the ground and was caught by another Weasel, whom he likewise entreated not to eat him. The Weasel said that he had a special hostility to mice. The Bat assured him that he was not a mouse, but a bat, and thus a second time escaped.

… with the concomitant moral: It is wise to turn circumstances to good account.

Not being all that interested in Florida politics, but wary of politicians in general, I’m not sure which ‘batty story’ would best apply …

CONF: Visions of Leadership in the Ancient World (RIA Colloquium)

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the people/institution mentioned in the post, not to rogueclassicism!):

The Royal Irish Academy Committee for Classical and Near Eastern Studies cordially invites you to a colloquium on “Visions of Leadership in the Ancient World”, which will be held on the 4th and 5th of November in the Academy, 19 Dawson Street, Dublin 2.

* Thursday 4 November, 18:00-20:00:

Prof. Amélie Kuhrt (University College London)
Achaemenid Images of Power (followed by reception)

* Friday 5 November, 9:30-17:00:

Dr. Ashley Clements (Trinity College Dublin)
Kings and Customs: Monarchical Rulers and the Rule of Nomos in Herodotus

Dr. Zuleika Rodgers and Dr. Martine Cuypers (Trinity College Dublin)
Theorizing Theocracy: Judaean Priesthood and Kingship

Dr. Alexander Thein (University College Dublin)
Leadership in Late Republican Rome

Dr. Michael Williams (NUI Maynooth)
A Tale of Two Bishops: Doctrine and Leadership in Late Antique Milan

For further information and registration please contact Martine Cuypers at cuypersm AT tcd.ie.

Citanda: Roman Republic Network

This was mentioned on the Classicists list a while ago … here’s a bit from the info page:

The purpose of this website is to exchange knowledge amongst scholars interested in the Roman Republic.

It aims to provide a forum for scholars working in all fields of historical, literary, linguistic or achaeological research involving the Roman Republic (c. 500-27 BC) and the nations surrounding it. A particular focus of the website are the processes of integration and identity formation that took place in this period in Italy and beyond.

The website intends to be the focal point for a network of scholars interested in these issues, and to facilitate contact between them. It will be used for sharing ongoing research, for example by publishing working papers on which you would like to receive feedback, and bibliographies, teaching resources, links, and other information that you think will be of interest to others.
If you would like to contribute, please contact Saskia Roselaar, saskia.roselaar AT manchester.ac.uk

… there’s a few working papers up at the site (among other things) but it seems to have stalled. Perhaps some of rogueclassicism’s readers have something to contribute?

CFP: ‘From the Cradle to the Grave’: Reciprocity & Exchange in Medicine and the Making of the Modern Arts

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Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the people/institution mentioned in the post, not to rogueclassicism!):

‘From the Cradle to the Grave’: Reciprocity & Exchange in Medicine and the
Making of the Modern Arts

Date: 14th April 2011, University of Exeter

Conference website:
http://centres.exeter.ac.uk/medhist/conferences/cradle/index.html

Keynote Speakers: Professor Brian Hurwitz (King’s College London) and
Deborah Kirklin MD (University College London & Editor of Medical Humanities)

‘From the Cradle to the Grave’ is an interdisciplinary event designed to
bring together postgraduate students and early career academics working
throughout the humanities, including the fields of English, Modern
Languages, Politics, Film, Classics, Medical History, Drama and Theology.
The conference will focus on the impact of health and medicine in the
‘making and unmaking’ of all modern arts, from the nineteenth century
onwards. Rather than simply examining finished texts, films, artworks or
pieces of theatre/film, the central goal of this conference is to examine
the processes by which medicine and the arts have influenced each other
across time and place and explore the ways in which both fields continue to
intersect.

We will be hosting an art and screen exhibition on the relationship between
hospital art and health using artistic pieces from Devon and Cornwall,
organised in conjunction with Arts and Health South West and Royal Devon and
Exeter Hospital. The conference will also incorporate a plenary discussion
on the nature of ‘Medical Humanities’ and publishing within the field, as
part of Deborah Kirklin’s keynote address.

We encourage papers examining contemporary and historical relationships
between medicine and the arts. Possible themes include but are not limited to:
• Representations of medicine in culture (e.g. music, visual cultures, film,
literature)
and the impact of culture on health/medicine
• Ethical implications of combining medicine and the arts
• Formulating and conceptualising the field of ‘Medical Humanities’
• Theoretical and empirical approaches to studying relationships between
medicine /
Medical History and the arts
• The politics, processes and limitations of exchange between medicine and
the arts
• Practice-based applications of reciprocity, such as promoting health
through the arts

We welcome papers in alternative formats, for example incorporating
performance pieces of music, dance, film or theatre. Writers, texts or
topics need not be canonical and we actively encourage papers discussing
writers, texts, visual media, theories and artefacts from around the world.

Abstracts (350 words for papers of twenty minutes duration) are invited by
21st December 2010. Please email abstracts and enquiries to conference
organisers Sam Goodman (sgg204 AT ex.ac.uk) or Victoria Bates (vlb204 AT ex.ac.uk).

The conference will be free of charge to attend, although we will encourage
delegates to give voluntary charitable donations to Paintings in Hospitals.
A limited number of travel bursaries of up to £50 are also available on
application. If you need a bursary, please express your interest to the
conference organisers when submitting your abstract.

JOB: Papyrology @ UMich

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PAPYROLOGY. The Department of Classical Studies and the University Library of the University of Michigan expect to make an appointment in Papyrology at the level of Assistant or Associate Professor (50%) and Archivist of the Papyrus Collection (50%), starting in September 2011.

Teaching responsibilities in the Department will include both undergraduate and graduate courses in Greek (especially koinê) and Latin and courses in classical civilization, as well as instruction in papyrology. The responsibilities for the Archivist position include management of the Papyrus Collection and its library, including further digitization of its holdings, publication of texts from the collection, support for researchers using the collection, and public outreach and development.

The Ph.D. must be completed by August 2011, but preference will be given to candidates whose dissertations are complete at the time of application. Please send a dossier including a letter of application, at least three letters of recommendation, current C.V., evidence of teaching experience, a statement of current and future research plans, a statement of teaching philosophy and experience, and a writing sample to the Papyrology Search Committee, Department of Classical Studies, University of Michigan, 2160 Angell Hall, 435 South State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1003, or in a pdf format to lsa-classics-search AT umich.edu , by November 19, 2010. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Michigan is supportive of the needs of dual career couples and is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

JOB: Hellenist @ Brown (TT)

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THE DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS at Brown University has been authorized to
search for an ancient Greek historian (open rank). The area of specialization is
open, as is the rank (tenure-track Assistant Professor to tenured Full Professor). The
successful candidate will teach Greek history, as well as Classical Greek language
and literature. Prerequisites for consideration include distinction in scholarship
and teaching in any aspect of Greek history. PhD must be in hand by June 30,
2011.

CANDIDATES should submit a letter of application and a curriculum vitae.
Untenured applicants should submit a single example of their writing, and
commission three letters of recommendation; tenured candidates should submit
the names and contact information of at least five references.

APPLICATIONS should be sent to:
Chair of the Ancient Greek History Search Committee
Department of Classics
Brown University
Box 1856
Providence, RI 02912, USA

Email submissions accepted. Send to Classics_Department@brown.edu with the subject heading
“Greek Historian Applicant”

REVIEW of applications will begin on November 1. The department will be conducting interviews of
candidates at the annual meeting of the American Philological Association in San Antonio, TX, in
early January 2011.

INQUIRIES may be directed to John_Cherry AT brown.edu.

Brown University is committed to diversity in its faculty and encourages
applications from qualified women and under-represented minority candidates.
http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Classics/

CFP: Authorship, Authority, and Authenticity in Archaic and Classical Greek Song

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Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the people/institution mentioned in the post, not to rogueclassicism!)

The Network for the Study of Archaic and Classical Greek Song (http://www.let.ru.nl/greeksong) invites paper proposals for a conference to be held at Yale University, July 6–10, 2011 with the theme:

Authorship, Authority, and Authenticity in Archaic and Classical Greek Song

The conference will explore authorship-related aspects of all genres of archaic and classical song (choral and monodic melic; iambic and elegiac poetry). Questions to be addressed include (but are not limited to):
• How does a song’s re-performance and/or changes in the conditions of its reception affect its authorship?
• Is authorship assigned to a song or a corpus of songs a check on its distribution or a means of wider propagation?
• How does archaic Greek song culture compare with the wider issues regarding fakes, pseudepigrapha, and plagiarism in Greek and Roman literature?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent by Dec. 1, 2010 as an e-mail attachment to Egbert Bakker (egbert.bakker AT yale.edu), Department of Classics, Yale University. Senders will be notified early in Jan. 2011 whether their paper has been accepted.

CFP: Cinema and Antiquity (J.P. Postgate Colloquium)

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Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the people/institution mentioned in the post, not to rogueclassicism!)

CINEMA AND ANTIQUITY: 2000-2011

The First J.P. Postgate Colloquium, University of Liverpool

12-14 July 2011

Keynote speakers:
Monica Cyrino, Pantelis Michelakis, Jon Solomon, Martin Winkler (tbc), Maria Wyke

The resurgence of cinema’s interest in antiquity that was triggered by the release of Gladiator in 2000 shows no signs of abating. In 2010 alone, five ancient world films are appearing on our screens (Percy Jackson & The Olympians: The Lightning Thief; Clash of the Titans; Agora; Centurion; Eagle of the Ninth; not to mention the TV series Spartacus: Blood and Sand). The public appetite for films that deal with ancient history and mythology apparently remains strong, and ‘classics and film’ courses have established themselves in universities worldwide, leading the way in the increasing prominence of reception studies within classics and ancient history. The time is ripe for reflection on these developments. This major international conference seeks to explore the directions that have been taken in a decade of moviemaking and scholarship, and to advance the field by concentrating on issues too often overlooked. We invite papers on all aspects of ancient world films released between 2000 and the present, but would particularly encourage engagement with any of the following areas:

Ø The filmmaking process, including film design, editing, cinematography, music.

Ø Marketing and publicity.

Ø Assessing audience receptions.

Ø Actors and stars.

Ø Television and the ancient world, including documentaries.

Ø Animation in film and television.

Ø Future directions in ‘classics and film’ scholarship.

We now invite proposals for 20 minute papers. Please send a 300 word abstract to the conference organisers, Joanna Paul (Joanna.Paul AT liv.ac.uk) and Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones (L.Llewellyn-Jones AT ed.ac.uk). Abstracts must be received no later than 31 December 2010.

More details will appear on the conference website, http://sace.liv.ac.uk/cinemaantiquity, in due course.

CFP: Postcolonial Latin American Adaptations of Greek and Roman Drama

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the people/institution mentioned in the post, not to rogueclassicism!)

Postcolonial Latin American Adaptations of Greek and Roman Drama

143rd Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association

January 5-8, 2012, Philadelphia, PA

Organized by Konstantinos P. Nikoloutsos (Saint Joseph’s University)

Research on the reception of classical drama has focused on Europe, Northern America, Africa, and
Australasia, but has ignored, for no justifiable reason, Latin America. Greek and Roman tragedies
regarded as canonical in the West migrated to this region since the early colonial years and have
been rewritten, especially in recent decades, to suit modern social and political concerns. For
example, Griselda Gambaro’s Furious Antigone (1986) and Jose Watanabe’s Antigone (1999), two of
the many Latin American adaptations of Sophocles’ play, appropriate a seminal story of protest
against state oppression to discuss the issue of the desaparecidos, the thousands of “missing”
civilians who were abducted, tortured, and murdered in secret by military and paramilitary forces
during the Dirty War in Argentina and Peru respectively. Similarly, in Medea in the Mirror (1960)
Jose Triana blends motifs from Euripides and Seneca to comment on the social and racial
inequalities in pre-Revolution Cuba, whereas Jorge Ali Triana revisits Sophocles in his film Oedipus
Mayor (1996) to document aspects of the Colombian Civil War waged between the army and
peasant guerillas.

The attention that Latin American adaptations of Greek and Roman drama have so far received
from Anglophone classicists (Nelli 2009, 2010; Nikoloutsos 2010, 2011; Torrance 2007) is
disproportionate to their number and geographical spread. Seeking to raise awareness about this
important area of research, this panel–the first of its kind to be organized at a national level–
solicits papers that examine case studies and approach the topic from a variety of theoretical and
interdisciplinary perspectives. Questions to be discussed include, but are not limited to, the
following:

1. What is the artistic and sociohistorical context for these adaptations?
2. Are they direct derivates of the Greek or Roman original, or are there other texts or traditions
involved in this hybridization?
3. Are these rewritings dominated by or emancipated from the ancient prototype in terms of
narrative structure, character development, and ideology?
4. Does this blending of classical themes with postcolonial experiences leave room for indigenous,
mestizo, mulatto, or other mixed-race identities to be expressed?
5. What conclusions about the migration of ideological topoi and stylistic features across Latin
America can we draw from these adaptations?

Abstracts must be received in the APA office by February 1, 2011. Please send an anonymous
abstract as a PDF attachment to apameetings@sas.upenn.edu. Be sure to mention the title of the
panel and provide complete contact information and any AV requests in the body of your email. In
preparing the abstract, please follow the APA’s formatting guidelines for individual abstracts. All
submissions will be reviewed anonymously. Inquiries can be addressed to
Konstantinos.Nikoloutsos AT sju.edu.

Classics Confidential

This item from the Classicists list looks right up rogueclassicism’s proverbial alley (whatever that means):

Dear all,

We would like to draw your attention to a new Classics resource that we have been developing in collaboration with many friends and colleagues over the past few months. Its name is Classics Confidential and it has the following website address:

http://www.classicsconfidential.co.uk

As the name suggests, Classics Confidential offers an informal behind-the-scenes glimpse into the world of Classics, relaying details of the latest Classics-based stories that have been hitting the news headlines and featuring interviews with a wide range of people involved in the subject, from Profs to PhD students, all talking personally, and passionately, about what gets them going in the research that they do.

Interviewees so far include:
– Phil Perkins and Paula James (The Open University)
– Michael Scott (Darwin College, Cambridge)
– Chris Pelling (Christ Church, Oxford)
– Shaun Tougher (University of Cardiff)
– Katherine Harloe and Susanne Turner (University of Reading)
– Nurith Yaari (University of Tel Aviv)
– with Irad Malkin and Tim Whitmarsh soon to make appearances…

While topics embrace:
– Etruscan DNA
– Melancholy and the infinite sadness
– Cypro-Minoan writing
– Ancient Eunuchs
– Democratic turns
– Ariadne’s parrot
– Sextus and his apple
– And so much more…

There is a facebook group to keep you updated on additions … we will, of course, mention any that are drawn to our attention here …

Fascism from Aesop?

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From a reviewish sort of thing in the New Straits Times of Michael Macrone’s Brush Up Your Classics: An Informative and Entertaining Guide to Understanding the Most Famous Words, Phrases, and Stories of Greek Classics. (inter alia)

Most of us are familiar with Aesop and his fables. He lived in sixth-century Greece. I am not surprised if phrases like “don’t count your chickens before they hatch”, “to blow hot and cold”, “the lion’s share” or “sour grapes” are attributed to him. But “fascist”? That’s news to us. Yes, it came from the story of a bundle of sticks. A father, fed up because his children were always at loggerheads, gave them a bundle of sticks to break. They couldn’t. The moral of the story is: united we stand. The Latin word for bundle is fascis plural fasces. Ironically, fascism became a political doctrine associated with, among others, Italy’s Benito Mussolini.

Okay … I’m semi-confused because while the ‘bundle of sticks’ story in Aesop is familiar enough with its “united we stand” moral, but I had never seen it connected etymologically to fascism before. A quick scan of google for Aesop and fascism brings up piles of examples, of course, but I’m having a great deal of trouble linking the Greek story etymologically to the portable execution kit borne by lictors for magistrates who had the power to give the ‘unbind the fasces’ order. Trotsky did mention a fable of Aesop in one of his pamphlets, but it wasn’t this one. Anyone know when the ‘thematic’ connection was made?