via Twitter: Ehud Netzer Collection @ BAR

Can’t figure out why Biblical Archaeology Society tweets don’t work like other tweets … in any event, a couple of Ehud Netzer items of interest there (and apologies to those who dealt with previous versions of this post that didn’t work:

New Year’s Eve Kissing Origins: Don’t Eat That Elmer

“This one isn’t even worth commenting on, other than to point out it is possibly the weakest attempt to link some modern practice to ancient Rome that I’ve seen in ages …

The custom of kissing can be traced back to the Ancient Roman festival of Saturnalia, which took place near the end of the year.

Germanicia Found?

Very interesting news item from Hurriyet:

Mosaics found during an illegal excavation in the southeastern province of Kahramanmaraş have led to the unearthing of an ancient city called Germenicia, which remained underground for 1,500 years. The mosaics, found under a house in the Dulkadiroğulları neighborhood, are expected to shed light on the history of the city.

The Roman-era city of Germenicia was unearthed by chance during an illegal excavation in the basement of a house. Preliminary examinations showed that the mosaics were high-quality contemporaries of those unearthed in the ancient cities of Zeugma and Yamaçevler. The first steps have been taken to completely unearth Germenicia and its mosaics, with houses in the area expropriated by the Culture Ministry.

Speaking to Anatolia news agency, Provincial Culture and Tourism Director Seydi Küçükdağlı said the location of Germenicia was shown as Kahramanmaraş on ancient maps, but archaeologists had been unable to determine its exact location because no architectural remnants of the city had been found.

He said the accidentally found mosaics, first stumbled upon during the illegal excavation in 2007, were the reason for finding the 1,500-year-old city. “Although the city was very important and magnificent – it even printed its own money at the time – it remained underground as a result of invasions and fires,” he said.

Küçükdağlı said excavations were initiated under the coordination of the Kahramanmaraş Museum Directorate at the end of November. “After the first mosaic was found, we examined the region and registered 19 parcels of land that could be important. We have expropriated five parcels and excavations have started on three. The houses where the mosaics were found have been torn down and a protective cover installed at the site.”

Open-air museum

Küçükdağlı said excavations would continue, and when completed the area would become an open-air museum to be visited by tourists.

He said seven archaeologists were participating in the excavation. “The mosaics have changed the future of the buried city. They are on the ground level of two-story magnificent villas built in the late-Roman period around 400 A.D. and will give us clues about the daily social life at the time.”

Küçükdağlı said the Culture Ministry also decided to carry out academic excavations in the region, adding that they sent invitations to 44 universities with archaeology departments and expected their response.

He said the fifth International Mosaics Corpus would be held in June in Kahramanmaraş and that the symposium would provide information about the history of the mosaics.

Ancient city of Germenicia

Archaeologists believe there are more remnants of the ancient city of Germenicia, which is named after the father of Roman Emperor Caligula, in the Namık Kemal neighborhood in the foothills of Ahir Mountain. They believe the city was buried by landslides and avalanches caused by a severe earthquake.

Research has shown the region likely featured as many as 100 villas with 15-20 rooms each. Excavation work on the newly unearthed mosaics so far has suggested they were likely floor decorations in one of those villas.

via: Mosaics found in SE Turkey lead to unearthing of ancient Roman city – Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review.

The photo accompanying the item:

via Hurriyet

via Hurriyet

 

Of course, the city is more properly called Germanicia (after Germanicus) … according to the Wikipedia article, it was originally a Hittite settlement and then refounded by various conquerors/occupiers. I’m assuming the Germanicia name change came during Germanicus’ conquests of Cappadocia and Commagene, but I can’t find an ancient reference to it … was it pre- or post-assassination? And if pre, was it an action which someone like Piso and his allies might consider ‘threatening’? I haven’t seen this ‘side’ of Germanicus before …