Iris Has a New Website

Lorna Robinson scripsit on the Classicists list:

We’re very pleased to announce that our new website Iris online is now live! Iris online is the new website for Iris magazine, our termly magazine which has been sent free to state schools across the UK for some years. Over the next few weeks we will be putting up the entire archives of the past five years of Iris magazine, as well as adding new content to the site every day. You will also find videos of Iris lessons and other extra material which will be regularly updated.

You can find Iris online at http://irisonline.org.uk/ – we hope you enjoy the site, and welcome any comments or ideas about it – you can reach us via this email or at editor AT irismagazine.org

The Iris Project is an educational charity introducing the languages and culture of the ancient world to UK state schools in order to enrich the curriculum. It was founded in the belief that the opportunity to learn about Classical languages, literature, histories and art should be made available to all, regardless of background, and that learning about these fascinating subjects can be a vital tool in promoting learning across the school curriculum in UK state schools. We run a wide range of initiatives in state schools across the country, focusing especially on children in socially excluded inner city regions, and we also run projects which introduce Classics to adults in city communities.

… and while you’re poking around the site, you just might come across an interview with yours truly!

Recent Nuntii Latinique Graecique

Nuntii Latini:

Akropolis World News:

Ephemeris:

Recent Ancient Drama Reviews ~ 10/11/11

From our Twitterfeed:

Circumundique ~ 10/10/11

Items of interest:

This Day in Ancient History ~ ante diem v idus octobres

ante diem v idus octobres

  • Meditrinalia — a somewhat obscure festival in terms of origins which involved tasting old wine and new wine, apparently with the goal of being cured of diseases old and new.
  • ludi Augustales scaenici (day 7 — from 11-19 A.D. and post 23 A.D.)
  • 304 A.D. — martyrdom of Tharacus