Historians Freebies from CQ

Until March 31st, you can access the following articles at Classical Quarterly for free!

  • THE NATURE OF THE RELIGIOUS DISPUTE IN THUCYDIDES 1.25.4
    Theodora Suk Fong Jim
  • A NEW APPROACH TO THE DESCRIPTION OF A BABYLONIAN HYDRAULIC WORK BY HERODOTUS
    K.L. Katsifarakis and I. Avgoloupis
  • TACITUS, ANNALS 1.1.1 AND ARISTOTLE
    Matthew Leigh
  • MEMORY, RELIGION AND HISTORY IN NERO’S GREAT FIRE: TACITUS, ANNALS 15.41–7
    KELLY SHANNON
  • SUETONIUS ON AUGUSTUS AS GOD AND MAN
    D. WARDLE
  • PYRRHUS AND PRIAM IN SUETONIUS’ TIBERIUS
    TRISTAN POWER
  • THUCYDIDES AND THE CHARACTER OF GREEK COLONISATION IN SICILY
    ANDREAS MORAKIS
  • AN OFFER YOU CAN’T RETRACT: XERXES’ NOD AND MASISTES’ WIFE (HERODOTUS 9.111.1)
    R. DREW GRIFFITH
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Akropolis World News

Catching up with the headlines at akwn.net:

  • Ταραχὴ ἐν τῇ Ἰταλικῇ Βουλῇ
  • Διαμένει ἡ ἐν τῇ Οὐκρανίᾳ ταραχή
  • Ὁ Ἰαπωνικὸς λοχαγὸς ὃς τοῦ πολέμου τελευτήσαντος ἔτι ἐμάχετο ἀποθνῄσκει
  • Ὁ Ῥόννυ Βίγς, ὁ τῆς ἑκατονταετίας κλέπτης, ἀπέθανεν

ktl …

Temple of Minerva beneath Milan Cathedral?

A brief item from ANSA:

The remains of a pagan temple believed to have been devoted to the goddess Minerva have been found under the Milan Cathedral.

The announcement was made Wednesday during the presentation of other archaeological finds, the remains of the ancient Mediolanum Forum discovered recently under the basement of the building housing the Pinacoteca Ambrosiana and the Biblioteca Ambrosiana.

Archaeological excavations to unearth the remains of the large city that, beginning in 292 A.D., was the capital of the Western Roman Empire for over a century continue despite funding difficulties. So far, part of the floor made out of what is known as ‘Verona stone’ has been found. The base of a section of an arcade can also be seen. The entire forum occupied an estimated surface area of 166 by 55 square meters. While waiting to be able to extend the excavations, the zone has been fitted with a special entrance on the side of the building, walkways, and illustrative signs to make visits by the public possible. The works were conducted with funding from the Cariplo foundation and the Lombardy regional government and are part of the project for a ‘Milan Archaeology’ route being readied for the 2015 Milano Expo, said regional culture councillor Cristina Cappellini.

Il Giorno gives, inter alia, some background to the discovery:

[...] Il Foro di Milano rappresentava la piazza principale della civitas romana, dove si svolgevano le maggiori attivita’ civili e religiose. Sorge alle fondamenta della Pinacoteca milanese, nell’area urbana attualmente compresa tra piazza Pio XI, piazza San Sepolcro e via della Zecca, che ospitava la platea forensis, la sede dei principali edifici pubblici: la Curia (luogo di riunione del Senato locale), la Basilica (in cui era amministrata la giustizia), il Capitolium (il tempio dedicato alla “Triade Capitolina”: Giove, Giunone e Minerva), le tabernae (negozi, botteghe artigiane, luoghi di ristorazione).

La scoperta e’ stata del tutto casuale: i reperti sono venuti alla luce durante i lavori di restauro della Biblioteca Ambrosiana, tra il 1990 e il 1992, rivelando una piccola parte della piazza del Foro. Il nuovo allestimento e’ ora in grado di mostrare una parte della pavimentazione, costituita da lastre di pietra bianca, detta ‘di Verona’ usata a partire dal 1* secolo dopo Cristo. Inoltre, lungo un lato del lastricato si notano un piccolo canale dove scorrevano le acque piovane e i gradini che conducevano alle botteghe e alle osterie. Si vede inoltre la base di un tratto del porticato che lo delimitava sul lato occidentale e dietro al quale si trovavano le ‘tabernae’ (botteghe).[...]

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More Ass-Kicking Athletes of Antiquity

Back in July we first mentioned some of the installments of Karl Smallwood’s Ass-Kicking Athletes of Antiquity series (at Man Cave Daily) and there have been a few more over the ensuing months that you might want to check out (keeping in mind the previous warning about potentially-offensive items popping up in the sidebar):

Folks wanting to see some ‘Classical Tradition’ might like:

January CSA Newsletter

Harrison Eiteljorg writes, inter alia:

Announcing that the January, 2014, issue – Volume XXVI, No. 3 – of the _CSA Newsletter_
is now available at http://csanet.org/newsletter/#winter14

"The Levantine Ceramics Project"
Further exploration of the potential for collaboration. — Andrea M. Berlin
http://csanet.org/newsletter/winter14/nlw1401.html

Archäologische Informationen in Open Access: A model case for changes in academic publishing"
Moving online requires careful planning. — Frank Siegmund, Editor, Archäologische Informationen
http://csanet.org/newsletter/winter14/nlw1402.html

"Website Review: Israel Antiquities Authority: Archaeological Survey of Israel"
A model website for a country’s archaeological patrimony. — Andrea Vianello
http://csanet.org/newsletter/winter14/nlw1403.html

"Technophobia and Technophilia"
Technology should not be feared or uncritically adopted. — Harrison Eiteljorg, II
http://csanet.org/newsletter/winter14/nlw1404.html

"Miscellaneous News Items"
An irregular feature.
http://csanet.org/newsletter/winter14/nlw1405.html