“New” Virgil Opera Coming to Auction

From a Christie’s press release:

On 12 June 2013, Christie’s London will offer a newly discovered, deluxe copy of Opera by Virgil (70-19 B.C.) in the sale of Valuable Printed Books & Manuscripts (estimate: £500,000 – 800,000). The Aeneid is accepted as the foundation stone of western literature, and this copy is the earliest edition a collector could ever aspire to own.

Printed in 1470, within a year of the beginning of printing in Venice, it is the second edition, acknowledged to be textually superior. Its rarity is indicated in the fact that the last copy to come on the market was sold almost a century ago, in 1920. This newly discovered copy is complete and printed on costly vellum for a wealthy patron; the elegance of its page and the hand-painted decoration add to its resemblance to a Renaissance manuscript, and indeed, an earlier owner may have regarded it as a manuscript, perhaps contributing to its true identity not being recognised until now.

This book combines rarity with great aesthetic beauty but also represents a monumental moment in the history of printing.

… I can’t find mention of when this was ‘newly discovered …

Poussin’s Hannibal Coming to Auction

This one’s interesting inasmuch as I’ve never seen this work before. The intro to a piece in Lebananon’s Daily Star:

Auction house Christie’s will offer an unconventional painting by French classical artist Nicolas Poussin, depicting Carthaginian general Hannibal astride an elephant, in July, expecting it to fetch 3-5 million pounds ($4.5-7.5 million). The early work is not considered one of the artist’s best and was little known until it appeared in public at an exhibition in Rouen in northern France in 1961.

But the auction house is hoping that its provenance – the painting was originally in the collection of Poussin’s greatest patron in Rome, scholar Cassiano dal Pozzo – will help boost interest when it goes under the hammer in London July 2.

“It was painted right after he arrived in Rome and he obviously developed as his career progressed,” said Georgina Wilsenach, head of old master and British paintings at Christie’s.

“I don’t think that takes away its appeal,” she added. “It is quite unusual. In terms of [Poussin] works coming up for auction, I think that most are religious paintings or mythological subjects.”

The canvas, dating from the mid-1620s and measuring around 1 by 1.35 meters, depicts Hannibal on an elephant leading his troops on the fabled journey from Iberia into northern Italy via the Alps to attack Roman forces in the Second Punic War. […]

And since it’s so unusual (I’ll bet most of you have never seen it either):

via the Daily Star

Very unPoussinish … clearly an early work.

Roman Sarcophagus in a Dorset Garden

Haven’t had this sort of story in a while, and this one is very interesting … from the Daily Mail:

An eagle-eyed antiques expert spotted a corner of what looked like a trough when he visited a property to look at some art indoors.

However, the expert spotted something in the garden – and fought through the undergrowth to reveal a 1,900-year-old marble sarcophagus.

Guy Schwinge, from Duke’s auction house in Dorchester, Dorset, also discovered a further treasure inside the house.

After rummaging around he happened upon an old auction catalogue from Duke’s – and it showed his saleroom had sold the ancient coffin in 1913.

It had remained at the Dorset house ever since, but the family had come to lose the knowledge of what it was.

Now this important lost treasure that has been dated to the second century AD is to go under the hammer again.

The 7ft long sarcophagus was made in Italy for a high ranking official, contemporaneous with Emperor Hadrian.

The decoration is centred by a pedimented entrance flanked by ionic columns, with the door slightly ajar. Further decoration includes laurel tied with a ribbon.

It is unclear when it was brought to the UK and its provenance goes back 100 years to when it was last sold.

The sarcophagus was part of the collection of Sir John Robinson from Newton Manor in Swanage, Dorset, which Duke’s sold.

In 1913 the object was bought by the family that owns the house on the Dorset coast where it was recently found, but it is unknown what it sold for.

Robinson was one of the greatest art experts and connoisseurs of the 19th century.

He was the first superintendent of the South Kensington Museum – now better known as the Victoria and Albert Museum.

He was also appointed as Queen Victoria’s Surveyor of Pictures and was largely responsible for building the collections of ancient and renaissance art at the museum.

He also amassed a large private collection of which this sarcophagus was a part. It’s possible that Robinson bought the sarcophagus on his travels to Italy.

Mr Schwinge said: ‘When I pulled up at the property I spotted what looked like a large garden trough peeping out from under some bushes.

‘I thought it looked interesting and when I commented the owner invited me to take a closer look.

‘As I drew closer I realised I was looking at a Roman sarcophagus in a remarkably good state of preservation, despite having been in the garden for 100 years.

‘After I went into the house to look at some other items, the client and I managed to find an old auction catalogue from 1913.

‘When I saw the name ‘Duke’s’ on the front I couldn’t believe it.

‘It turned out that we were the last firm to handle the sale in 1913 when we sold the collection of Sir John Charles Robinson at Newton Manor in Swanage.’

Art expert Laurence Keen OBE said: ‘This is a very important item. It is, to my mind, late 2nd or early 3rd century AD with carving of the highest quality.

‘The undecorated back probably suggests that it came from a private mausoleum of a high status individual where the tomb was placed against a wall.’

Another art expert said: ‘It is quite exceptional for a piece of Roman imperial art of this importance turn up in a garden.

‘It would be fascinating to find out where Robinson acquired it, but my view is that he probably purchased it on his travels in Italy.

‘It is much too fine to be Romano British.

‘There is always the chance, of course, that it came to this country in the 18th century and was originally part of one of the important Grand Tour collections of the Age of Enlightenment.’

The sale is on September 28.

The original article includes some photos (both now and ‘then’) … it’s a very interesting piece … not sure I’ve ever seen a temple depicted with the door slightly ajar (did this ‘house’ a former priest of some sort?).

Romans At Iwo Jima?

Okay … can’t resist this one. I’m zonked from the first day of school so I’m idly doing one of my semi-regular checks of ebay items and I come across this:

from an ebay auction … click for a larger version

It is described as a Roman lead relief from the 1th (sic) century A.D. depicting the capture of Vercingetorix. Here’s the original auction … is it just me or does it remind anyone else of:

wikimedia

Interesting Item Coming to Christie’s

One of the things that annoys me regularly when trying to cover auction things is that I can never seem to find the original press release when announcements are made of items which aren’t available in a calendar yet. A case in point is the coverage of the following item, which is coming to auction at Christie’s in December. It is mentioned both by Art Daily and Gallerist:

Christie’s via Art Daily

Here’s an excerpt of the description from Art Daily:

Christie’s announced the sale of a set of two important Roman bronze genre statues on December 5, circa late 1st century B.C.- early 1st century A.D. (estimate: $3,000,000-5,000,000). Both approximately twenty inches in length, the sculptures each depict a young girl pursuing a partridge. The toddlers are positioned similarly, sitting on the base, leaning forward with open arms and splayed fingers, stretching toward a bird that is just out of reach. The features are exquisitely detailed, with the eyes inlaid with white stone, one preserving further metal inlays. The lashes are of trimmed sheet bronze and their hair is delicately curled and formed in to a loose top-knot. The partridges are equally impressive, with the plumage naturalistically represented as they turn their head back to glance at their pursuer. The bronzes come to Christie’s from a private collection, the owner’s family having acquired them from renowned Swiss collector Giovanni Züst in the 1960s, whose collection formed the nucleus of Basel’s famed Antikensammlung.

see also:

… what a great little pair of bronzes!