d.m. Victor Sarigiannidis

From Greek Reporter:

Eminent archeologist of Pontian-Greek origin Victor Sarigiannidis passed away early Monday morning in Moscow at the age of 84. Sarigiannidis was known for discovering a slew of Ancient Greek cities, temples and ruins.

He was born on September 23, 1929 in Tashkent (Uzbekistan) to Greek parents. In 1952, he graduated from the State University of Central Asia (Tashkent) and in 1961, he received a Master of Archaeology and Middle Eastern Studies from the Institute of Archaeology in Moscow. In 1975, he was named Doctor of Historical Science of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Since 1955, he had been working at the Institute of Archaeology of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow). He was an honorary member of the Greek Anthropological Association, a member of the American Society of Sciences and the Federation of Journalists in Russia.

He began his excavations in Central Asia and Afghanistan in 1949, and during his career he discovered many unknown civilizations and recorded the spread of Hellenic civilization and culture prior to Alexander the Great’s expedition. Among his most important findings are six undisturbed tombs at Tillya Tepe from first century AD, and the ancient ruins of the Bronze Age Kingdom of Margiana of the third century BC.

Sarigiannidis was honored with the title of the Ambassador of Hellenism in 1998, and received an honorary title from the University of Ioannina in 2000. He was also honored with the Gold Cross of the Order of Merit of the Greek Republic in 2002 and the High Distinction of Turkmenistan in 2001.

He wrote 20 books in Russian, which have been translated to English, German, Japanese and Greek. More than 200 of his articles have been published in international scientific journals.

Possible Papal Tweeting Howler?

As previously mentioned, I’m planning on doing some sort of analysis of Papal tweets and was going to sort of do a weekly compilation. However, I’m not sure I can sit on this one I just noticed (from yesterday) … first, the English version:

Now Latin:

… seems rather Catullan, no? (here’s the entry for frico from L&S if you need a refresher)

CJOnline Review | Heimback, A Roman Map Workbook

(re)posted with permission

A Roman Map Workbook: Second Edition. By ELIZABETH HEIMBACH. Mundelein, Ill: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2013. Pp. vii + 140. 2012. Paper, $22.00 ISBN 978-0-86516-799-5.

Reviewed by Michele Valerie Ronnick, Wayne State University

This workbook designed for the secondary schoolroom opens with an introductory unit of explanatory text and practice exercises concerning the origin of the word cartographer, some Latin based directional terms (e.g. N, S, E, & W), and other phrases from astronomy and myth such as the Four Winds, the Big Dipper and the Northern Lights.

Then follow thirteen chapters on specific places and topics in the Graeco-Roman world: I. Italia Antiqua; II. Orbis Terrarum Romanus; III. Viae Romanae; IV. Urbs Romae: Seven Hills and a River, Districts and Landmarks, V. The Forum; VI. Sinus Cumanus; Pompeii; VII. Historia Romana: Part I- The Conquest of the Italian Peninsula, Part II- The Punic Wars, and Part III- The Roman Empire; VII. Graecia; IX. Athenae; X. Gallia; XI. Britannia; XII. Epici Antiqui; XIII. Scriptores Latini: Part I- Latin Authors, and Part II- Later Writers of Latin.

Each chapter has its own map indicating places of importance. Eleven of them provide blank versions of he chapter maps which have been stripped of their labels. These ready-made templates are ideal for quizzes or certamen contests. While some chapters are longer than others, all of them provide a series of exercises using matching, short answer (sometimes in Latin, sometimes in English), and fill-in-the blank questions. In addition each chapter has a set of ideas for further work on a variety of projects. Most are stimulating. However, those that have been linked to internet sites/links may already be out of date, and the map making project in Chapter III using several sugary ingredients may be less than ideal.

Some of the problems raised by R. Scott Smith (BMCR 2011.06.61) concerning the quality and coverage of the maps in the first edition of this workbook remain. The section of Chapter VII (and its map) titled ‘The Punic Wars’ still deals only with the Second. Adding a map of Carthage to this chapter would be a plus. However, the map of Gaul (75) has been corrected and the map of the Roman Empire (85) has been changed to show the empire’s boundaries. A good number of Greek and Latin accent marks are still missing. Here are a few examples:

a) Exercise II. 6, (p. 15) should read nōmen.

b) The text in para. 5, line 4 (p. 18 ) should read Nīlus.

c) The phrase "into the city," para. 1, line 6, (p. 18) should read εἰς τὴν Πόλιν or failing that transliterated to eis tēn polin. On the same page, para. 3, line 3, should read Apollōnius.

d) The map of the Roman world (p. 21) should read Borysthenēs.

e) Exercise X.17, (p. 26) should read Judaea.

f) Exercise I.13, (p. 52) should read Statōris. Thus a thorough re-reading of the text needs to be performed and a list of errata issued.

For further editions, I suggest that the author consider adding names and birthplaces of writers such as Seneca (Corduba), Emperor Claudius (Lugdunum), Quintilian (Calagurris), Fronto (Cirta), Apuleius (Madaurus) and Augustine (Thagaste) to Part I of the chapter on Latin authors, and that she consider including a few women such as Hildegard von Bingen (Bermersheim) and Anna Maria van Schurman (Cologne), as well as men famous for their Latin like John Milton (London), Isaac Newton (Woolsthorpe) and William Harvey (Folkstone) to Part II on later writers.

Maps of other ancient cities (Delphi, Epidaurus, Knossos, Leptis Magna, and Mycenae) would add interest and variety to the workbook. An appendix for further study would be useful for the more ambitious and/or sophisticated student mentioning such ancient things as the map of the world in the Porticus Vipsania, the Marble Plan of Septimius Severus, and the Tabula Peutingeriana, as well as giving important modern sources such as Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography, founded in 1935 for the study of early maps, and Richard J. A. Talbert, (ed.), Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World (2002). Despite its flaws this is a useful little workbook. A Teacher’s Guide $22.00 (ISBN: 978-0-86516-801-5) is also available.

[©2013 by The Classical Association of the Middle West and South. All rights reserved.]

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem xii kalendas decembres

ante diem xii kalendas decembres

  • Mercatus — time to restock the cupboards after the Jupiterfest!
  • 63 A.D. — shipwreck of St. Paul (by one reckoning)
  • 270 (?) — birth of the future emperor Maximinus Daia
  • 284 A.D. — elevation of Diocletian to the rank of Caesar  Augustus

… a decade ago at rogueclassicism, the major news appears to be the discovery of an inscription referring to Simon the Just (if the links are dead to that one, try: Gospel verse found on ancient shrine )

CFP: Greek Art in Context

seen on the Classicists list:

Greek Art in Context
An International Conference at the University of Edinburgh
7th-9th April 2014

We invite offers of papers and posters for the forthcoming conference, Greek Art in Context, to be held at the University of Edinburgh, 7th-9th April 2014.
The deadline for electronic abstracts is FRIDAY 20TH DECEMBER 2013.

This two and a half-day conference will explore the broad notion of context in relation to Greek Art. Its aim is twofold: to address the problem of defining and determining context from a theoretical point of view and to explore how it affects the interpretation of the material culture of ancient Greece from the Dark Ages to the end of the Hellenistic period. What do we mean by context? In which ways and under what circumstances does context become relevant for the interpretation of Greek material culture? Which contexts should we look at – viewing context, political, social and religious discourse, artistic tradition…? What happens when there is no context?

We welcome proposals for papers of 30 minutes addressing questions relevant to the scope of the conference. There will be 8 three-paper sessions followed by Q&A. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:
- Same iconographies, different meanings. Greek images abroad
- Interpreting old works through new lenses
- Reading objects in context
- Images and social realities
- Distribution, consumption and trade of Greek art.
- Contexts of use of Greek vases and how they affect our interpretation of the object and its images
- Interpreting monumental sculpture and non-portable objects
- Greek art in its modern contexts (museums, collections etc.)

KEYNOTE speakers: Prof. Carmen Sánchez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid) and Dr. Antonis Kotsonas (University of Edinburgh).
Abstracts of ca. 300 words are invited from scholars working in the fields of classical archaeology and history of art and with an interest in contextualization as an integral part of the study of ancient Greek art. The conference is open to advanced postgraduate students. Please send title and abstract of your proposed paper/poster to the conference organiser, Dr. Diana Rodríguez Pérez (diana.rodperez AT gmail.com), by Friday, 20th December 2013. We will inform you by 15th of January if your abstract has been accepted. The language of the conference is English.
Posters related to the topics outlined above are also welcome. Instructions regarding the posters format will be provided at a later stage. Posters will be exhibited throughout the conference in the McMillan Room of the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. Authors will have a chance to give a short 5-minute presentation on their poster during the drinks receptions. Small prizes will be awarded to the best posters of the conference.
The conference fee is £50 standard rate and £35 for students. It includes coffee and tea on the 7th, 8th and 9th, sandwich lunch on the 7th and 8th, as well as the drinks receptions on the 7th and 8th. Delegates are expected to arrange their own travel and accommodation. They are also encouraged to apply for funding at their own institutions.
This conference is made possible through the generous support of School of History, Classics and Archaeology of the University of Edinburgh, and of the Institute of Classical Studies. Several student bursaries will be available thanks to a contribution from the Classical Association.

Classical Words of the Day

Linguatweets:

CFP | ORGANS: Form, Function and Bodily Systems in Greco-Roman Medicine

Seen on various lists:

‘ORGANS: Form, Function and Bodily Systems in Greco-Roman Medicine’

Sponsored by the Society for Ancient Medicine and Pharmacy (SAM) SAM is an affiliated group of
the American Philological Association.

Accepted papers will be presented at a SAM panel at the APA at the 2015 meetings, which will be
held January 8-11, 2015 in New Orleans, LA. Panelists must be members of the APA at the time of
presentation.

Largely hidden from sight, the organs of the body have always offered fascination as well as
frustration. We sense their function in the course of sustaining a biological life, but can for the
most part only infer the details of their processes. In antiquity this alienation of the self from the
material components of the human body and their interactions was especially acute, and so many
of the ancient medical texts are clearly groping for ways to understand the role of individual
organs in health and disease, both physiological and psychological. We invite papers for this
session on all aspects of the organs in Greco-Roman medicine, and particularly encourage
contributions with cultural and philosophical dimensions, as well as clinical, therapeutic and
physiological.

Please send an abstract of 500-600 words of your proposed paper (20 mins.) by e-mail to Ralph
M. Rosen (rrosen
AT sas.upenn.edu). Deadline for submission of abstracts is March 1, 2014.

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem vi kalendas novembres

ante diem vi kalendas novembres

  • 97 A.D. – The emperor Nerva adopts the future emperor Trajan
  • 312 A.D – Battle of the Milvian Bridge; Constantine I has a vision and defeats Maxentius to become sole emperor (not sure the vision was the same day as the battle?)

… and a decade ago at rogueclassicism, in addition to some nice eye candy from an auction, we were reading about the discovery of Trajan’s bridge across the Danube (which, incidentally, was presented as a ‘new’ find (albeit with sonar) in that documentary a short time ago: Review: Rome’s Lost Empire) …

Curse Tablet from Jerusalem

Owen Jarus’ interesting piece at Livescience is getting picked up all over the place … some excerpts:

A lead curse tablet, dating back around 1,700 years and likely written by a magician, has been discovered in a collapsed Roman mansion in Jerusalem, archaeologists report.

[...]

The text is written in Greek and, in it a woman named Kyrilla invokes the names of six gods to cast a curse on a man named Iennys, apparently over a legal case. [See Photos of the Ancient Curse Tablet ]

“I strike and strike down and nail down the tongue, the eyes, the wrath, the ire, the anger, the procrastination, the opposition of Iennys,” part of the curse reads in translation. Kyrilla asks the gods to ensure that “he in no way oppose, so that he say or perform nothing adverse to Kyrilla … but rather that Iennys, whom the womb bore, be subject to her…”

To obtain her goal Kyrilla combined elements from four religions, Robert Walter Daniel, of the Institut für Altertumskunde at the University of Cologne, told LiveScience in an email. Of six gods invoked, four of them are Greek (Hermes, Persephone , Pluto and Hecate), one is Babylonian (Ereschigal) and one, Abrasax, is Gnostic, a religion connected to early Christianity . Additionally, the text contains magic words such as “Iaoth” that have a Hebrew/Judaism origin.

A professional magician likely created the curse for Kyrilla, who may have literally used a hammer and nails to perform a magical rite that enhanced the effectiveness of the curse, Daniel said.

“The hammering and nailing is a form of gaining control over the person(s) targeted in magical texts,” he wrote in the email.

Kyrilla and her curse-recipient, both probably members of the Roman middle or upper class, were likely in some legal dispute, as the curse tablet bears similarities to others found in Cyprus that are known to have been used in legal cases. Additionally the word “opposition” in this text hints at a legal matter.

[...]

Archaeologists Doron Ben Ami and Yana Tchekhanovets, both with the Israel Antiquities Authority, told LiveScience in an email they discovered the remains of mosaics and frescos that contain geometric and floral motifs near the tablet. They also found carved bone fragments from a box that depict the “Triumph of Dionysus,” a Greek god , along with maritime imagery such as seahorses.

The team also uncovered roof tiles in the mansion that contain the stamp of the Roman 10th legion, a unit that, for a time, was stationed in Jerusalem. “This practice is common for all the provinces of the Roman Empire . In peaceful times soldiers were responsible for ‘civil engineering’: They built roads and aqueducts, produced tiles and bricks, etc. The 10th legion produced so many tiles, that it was enough for many more years of construction activity in the city, long after the legion itself left Jerusalem,” Ben Ami and Tchekhanovets said.

The researchers also found female figurines, probably depicting a goddess. They were likely used in a “private cult” whose members included residents of the mansion. These figurines were found at or below floor level and may not have been part of the second-floor room that the curse was placed in.

[...]

… the original article has more info about the ‘mansion’ itself and there’s also a nice slideshow.

That said, I thought we had another example of a curse tablet from Jerusalem in the last five years or so … my search engines are failing me.  Whatever the case, the full story (as Jarus tells us) is in the latest ZPE …

CFP. Greening the Gods: Ecology and Theology in the Ancient World.

Seen on the Classicists list:

GREENING THE GODS: ECOLOGY AND THEOLOGY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD 18th-19th March 2014 CALL FOR PAPERS

A seismic shift in thinking about the environment from the 1960s onwards can blind us to the fact that inhabitants of the ancient world (c. 800 BCE – 400 CE) were also acutely aware that they existed as part of an ecological system. Yet for these thinkers it was not rapidly melting icecaps which made examining their relationship with the environment so urgent, but the theological questions it raised. This conference will embrace pagan, Jewish and Christian thinking about the intersection of theology and ecology, whether expressed in sources we might now label philosophy, scripture, natural history, science, liturgy or folklore.

How did these thinkers understand their natural environment to stand in relation to the divine? And how did this understanding condition human interaction with the natural world? By bringing together biblical scholars, classicists, philosophers and theologians the first aim of this conference is to paint a cohesive and multi-disciplinary picture of the theological sophistication of ancient thinking about nature.

At the same time, the conference will not lose sight of our current ecological crisis. What impact, if any, should ancient thinking about the environment have on our own ecological thinking? While individual advances have been made in theorising how ancient thinking might inform modern responses to ecological issues, there is still vital need for cross-disciplinary discussion of the impact of such thinking on relatively new disciplines such as environmental philosophy and eco-theology, and on contemporary calls to environmental action. As such this conference aims, in a mutually reinforcing process, to shape both our knowledge of the ancient world and the work of those who are writing the theology, philosophy and ethics of the twenty-first century.

The conference is sponsored jointly by the Classics Faculty, University of Cambridge and the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion and will be held in St Edmund’s College, Cambridge. Plenary speakers include Prof Robin Attfield (Cardiff), Prof Melissa Lane (Princeton), Prof Michael Northcott (Edinburgh), Prof Richard Seaford (Exeter), Prof David Sedley (Cambridge), Dr Helen Van Noorden (Cambridge), Dr Emmanuela Bakola (KCL) and Dr Edward Adams (KCL). The conference organisers, Dr Ailsa Hunt and Dr Hilary Marlow, invite short papers that examine any aspect of how ecology and theology intersect in the ancient world, and how such interplay impacts on contemporary thinking about the environment. Papers may include, but are not restricted to, those areas outlined below:

· textual, theological and philosophical perspectives on human relationships with nature in the ancient world

· visions for nature in prophetic, apocalyptic and eschatological literature

· the influence of Stoicism or other philosophical systems on ancient attitudes towards the natural world, and their significance in modern environmental philosophy

· the theological thinking behind ancient attitudes to issues such as deforestation, mining, dams, pollution, vegetarianism, sacrifice or vivisection

· philosophical ideals of self sufficiency and their impact on ancient thinking about nature

· the intersection of theological and ecological thinking in ancient philosophical debate about the perishability of the world / periodic cataclysms in which civilisation is erased

· the identification and interpretation of natural disasters and portents

· (ab)uses of ancient thinking about nature in neopagan environmental movements

It is anticipated that the allocated time for each paper will be 20 minutes, with additional time for questions/discussion. If you are interested in presenting a paper, please send a title and abstract (200 words max) to Dr Ailsa Hunt at agm46 AT cam.ac.uk before 31st October 2013.

Presenters and delegates (apart from invited plenary speakers) will be responsible for their own accommodation in Cambridge and a list of options will be provided. For further enquiries please contact either of the organisers on agm46 AT cam.ac.uk or hm309 AT cam.ac.uk. It is hoped that selected papers from the conference will be published in a volume edited by Dr Hunt and Dr Marlow.

CFP: From I, Claudius, to Private Eyes: the Ancient World and Popular Fiction.

From I, Claudius, to Private Eyes: the Ancient World and Popular Fiction.
16-18th June 2014

Bar-Ilan University, Israel

Keynote speakers:
Professor Edith Hall, Kings’ College, London
Dr. Nick Lowe, RHUL
Authors confirmed as participating:

Steven Saylor (Gordianus the Finder series)
Caroline Lawrence (the Roman Mysteries series)
Over the last few years work, has begun on the subject of classics and children’s fiction, with conferences being held in Lampeter (Hodkinson and Lovatt, 2009) and Warsaw (2012), and three publications presently forthcoming on this subject. Yet there has been surprisingly little sustained consideration of adult fiction and the ancient world, or indeed of children’s literature within the wider context of popular fiction, despite the fact that this is a vast and rich field. The forthcoming conference, therefore, by way of setting about rectifying this situation, will be the first serious consideration of the full range of receptions of classics in popular fiction. It will bring together scholars from a range of disciplines (classics, English and other modern languages, comparative literature etc.) with popular modern authors, in order to acquire a range of perspectives on the subject.
Abstracts (up to 300 words) are invited for papers (20 minutes in length) on any aspect of the reception of the ancient world in popular fiction. Papers may focus on broader issues and overviews of the subject in general or more specific reading and interpretations of individual texts or collections.
Possibilities of subjects include, but are not limited to the following questions and issues:

What role does popular fiction play in contributing to general impressions of the ancient world? What (other) roles should it play?
What makes ancient Greece and Rome attractive as a setting for popular fiction? What are the difficulties inherent in utilising the ancient world?
What differences are there between Greece and Rome in popular fiction?
What role do ancient Greece and Rome play in popular fiction in different societies and countries in the modern world?
Changing trends in historical fiction concerning the ancient world.
The overlap between historical fiction set in the classical world and other genres: detective novels, mystery novels, romance etc.
Classical mythology and popular fiction.
How does popular fiction interact with other media (film, television, computer games, the internet etc.)?
How does juvenile fiction about the ancient world differ from, or overlap with, adult fiction in the same field?
Please send abstracts to lisa.maurice AT biu.ac.il, citing full name and title, institution, provisional title of the paper, by 31st December 2013.

Hyping and Pondering the Bosham Head

This one’s interesting primarily because it demonstrates that hype can be informative … the so-called “Bosham Head” is a huge, highly-eroded lump of stone found a couple of centuries ago which was clearly once the head of a statue of some sort. There was a lecture series this week  where the head is housed (Chicester’s Novium Museum) and all this week we’ve been getting hints that they have used laser scanning to possibly identify the head.  Early in the week, Culture24, e.g., mentioned one guy:

A 26-stone head found in a flower bed in a Hampshire vicarage garden could represent Nero, the rarely-glimpsed Emperor whose first century rule over the Roman Empire began when he was a 14-year-old.

Known as the Bosham Head, the spectacular cranium imposes itself within the Collections Discovery Centre at Fishbourne. Archaeologists have been using 3D scanning in a bid to determine whether it was carved seperately from its body.

“The Jupiter Stone found beneath the post office on West Street depicts the iconic image of the three graces, although only two women are shown,” says Anooshka Rawden, the Collections Officer at Chichester’s Novium museum.

“Academics often debate whether the Romans produced art at all or whether they simply copied and adapted original work by the ancient Greeks.

“Perhaps the maker decided two looked better than three, or the third grace didn’t fit the space.”

Portraits of Nero were often destroyed as a backlash against his reputation for cruelty.

“It is really exciting that more information about the Bosham Head is being uncovered, including new speculation as to who it may depict,” says Eileen Lintill, of Chichester District Council.

“It has always been a bit of a mystery to museum staff as to who it was meant to represent. [...]

Yesterday, the News reiterated that with a bit more detail:

Dr Miles Russell, a senior lecturer in prehistoric and Roman archaeology from Bournemouth University, believes the object, known as the Bosham Head, could be a bust of the Roman Emperor Nero.

Little is known about the 26st stone head, which is on display at the Novium Museum, Chichester. It was found many years ago in a flower bed in the vicarage garden at Bosham.

Emperor Nero came to Britain at the age of 14 and ruled the Roman Empire from 54 to 68 AD. Depictions of him are rare as he was regarded as a cruel leader and portraits of him were destroyed. [...]

Then the Daily Mail waded in, attributing a different identification (although seemingly crediting the same identifier):

Archaeologists at Bournemouth University used 3D laser scans to pick out facial features and a distinctive hairstyle, which led them to conclude that the statue was of Emperor Trajan.

Miles Russell, a senior lecturer in prehistoric and Roman archaeology at the university and Harry Manley, from the school of applied sciences, led the study, which has been assisted by The Novium museum.

It concluded the statue, made of Italian marble was set up by Trajan’s successor, Hadrian, on a visit to Britain in AD 121-122 and would have greeted visitors as they entered Chichester Harbour.[,,,]

Depending on the angle, it does seem to be more Trajan-like than Neroish … then again, they both seem to have had that bowl-cut thing going on in their statuary:

From the statue in Rome. The Emperor Nero.

From the statue in Rome. The Emperor Nero. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Head of Trajan (reign 98–117 CE), from an over...

Head of Trajan (reign 98–117 CE), from an oversized statue (around 2.70 m height). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Nuntii Latini | Nuntii Latini mensis Septembris 2013 (Bremen)

@ Radio Bremen: Monatsrückblick auf Latein

Latein-Monatsnachrichten: Nuntii Latini mensis Septembris 2013
http://www.radiobremen.de/nachrichten/latein/latein/nuntiilatiniseptembris108.html

Angela Merkel victoriam magnam consecuta +++ Mursi in ius vocatus +++ In bello civili gasum mortiferum adhibitum +++ Electiones in Bavaria atque Hassia habitae +++ Costa Concordia erecta +++ Lugete, o Veneres +++ Dominus circulorum +++ Mutatio loci inexspectata +++ Notabilia: Musica in Colonia Agrippinensium Romana

{category nuntii latini graecique]