Lost City in the Dardanelles?

This one is really difficult to piece together as much seems to have been lost in translation and/or editing. Here are two versions of the same story (tip o’ the pileus to Explorator reader Richard Griffiths for these) … first, from National Turk:

A group of scientists and archeologists from Canakkale (Dardanelles) University have found traces of a lost city, older than famed Troy, now buried under the waters of Dardanelles strait.

Led by associate professor Rüstem Aslan, the archeology team made a surface survey in the vicinity of Erenkoy, Canakkale on the shore. The team has found ceramics and pottery, what led them to ponder a mound could be nearby. A research on The found pottery showed that the items belonged to an 7000 years old ancient city. The team has intensified the research and discovered first signs of the lost city under the waters of Dardanalles Strait.
Lost city found in Turkey: It is older than Troy

The lost city lies in the sea floor in the Aegean entrance of the strait on the shores of Europen side. The professor told”the pottery indicates the city is from around 5000 BC. We believe the civilizations on the shores of Dardanelles and Bosphorus straits had been buried under water. This latest mound discovered is also 90% under water and gives significant hints on the sea levels then.”

The latest discovery of the ancient city is as important as the funda in the ongoing digs in the Marmaray Project in Istanbul, the historians and scientists state.

… and from something called Sott.net, which picks up an item from the Anatolia News Agency which I was unable to track down anywhere else:

A settlement area from the pre-historic period has been found in the Dardanelles, according to the head of Troy excavations, Associate Professor Rüstem Aslan.

“We have found a prehistoric settlement dating back to 5,000 B.C. But only 5 percent of the settlement exists,” said Aslan. The archaeology team examined the coast from the entrance of the Dardanelles to Çanakkale city center, he said. “The coastal excavations had been finished and we unearthed something unexpected around Bozköy.”

The settlement was 2,000 years older than Troy, Aslan said. “We know that almost all settlements older than 5,000 years ago were established on high plateaus.” The reason for the settlement pattern in high places has been questioned, he said. “This discovery gives us important clues that people settled deliberately because of the rise and fall of the sea,” he added.

Aslan said it was the first time that such a settlement was found in the Dardanelles and there is no information about this settlement in any map or document. “We can easily see remains of a 7,000-year-old lost settlement here,” he said. “We can call this place a lost city.”

I wonder if Robert Ballard had helped to point them to this: Catching Up With Robert Ballard

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