#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 9, 2021

Hodie est a.d. V Id. Sept. 2774 AUC ~ 3 Boedromion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Greek/Latin News

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Fresh Bloggery

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Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

We’ve covered bloody battles, we’ve covered stunning cities, we’ve covered civilisations far away from the ancient Mediterranean. But in some 120 episodes of The Ancients we hadn’t covered one of the most popular topics in the world: sex. That is, until now. In today’s episode, strap yourself in for almost an hour’s worth of content all about what the Romans thought of sex. What was acceptable? What wasn’t? And why were the Romans so obsessed with carving penises at sites across the Roman Empire. From Pompeii to Hadrian’s Wall. Joining Tristan in today’s podcast is L J Trafford, the author of the upcoming book Sex and Sexuality in Ancient Rome. Suffice to say, adult themes feature in this episode.

The symposia–all-male drinking parties–were the playground and hunting ground of Athens’ elite courtesans. But they had their dangers, too. Join us as we attend a symposium with the fast set of Ancient Athens. We’re going to hang out with the hetaerae, drink our faces off, flirt outrageously with everyone in range, and debate with the philosophers until the sun comes up.

The Social War was a five-year war fought in the 1st century BCE (91-87) between the Roman Republic and many of its allied communities. Dr. Seth Kendall, Associate Professor, Georgia Gwinnett College, returns to the show to speak about the events in the third year of the war.

Fresh Youtubery

Exhibition Related Things

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a disease bearing wind.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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