#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 2, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Non. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 18 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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The fourth and final episode in our series on Troy: Fall of a City, discussing episodes seven and eight. Thank god. We repeated a number of things we’ve been saying all the way along in our final notes in this last episode about Fall of a City, but we hopefully have managed to do so in a clear and synthesized way. Thanks for coming on this four-episode journey with us, and we’ll be back in two weeks with, at last, some new material!

In the Garden of the Hesperides, Hermes gathers apples for the next leg of the journey while Perseus collects stories from the Titan Atlas, who holds up the sky.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an end to threatening events.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 1, 2021

Hodie est Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 17 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Joined by another fantastic guest and man of constant sorrow, Joel Christensen, we trace the unbroken line from Homer to Mumford & Sons through the Cohen Brothers. Is this more or less of an Odyssey adaptation than its directors let on? What makes Odysseus Odysseus? How does myth meet a nostalgia for a certain visage of the American South? Is Clooney too charming to be the man of many ways?

We get into classic Hollywood’s take on Egypt’s most (in)famous queen with the help of Heavy Metal Classicist Jeremy Swist and pharaonic expert Nikki Becklinger. How do modern visions of Cleopatra depart or align with the historical ruler? What is the significance of Cleopatra then and now? How much did it cost to make this movie? Answer on that: a lot. Our real consensus though is that the face of ancient women should be more than Cleopatra. We stan for the Hatshepsut movie!

The Nag Hammadi Library, Codex Tchacos, and Berlin Codex, as they came to light in the twentieth century, radically changed our understanding of early Christianity.

In this episode I take a detailed look at Seneca’s version of Medea. The story of a woman who is a foreigner and a witch suited his form of dark tragedy perfectly.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a year of strife and disagreements.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 27, 2021

Hodie est pr. Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 16 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Throughout the three centuries of Ptolemaic control over Egypt, their dynasty can be best described as having a split identity. Ruling from Alexandria, the new intellectual and cultural capital of the Greek-speaking world, the Ptolemies were very much Hellenistic kings and queens. But Egypt was an ancient land, and they needed to come to terms with the pharaonic tradition that had dominated Egyptian life for the better part of 3,000 years. As the longest reigning dynasty in Egyptian history, the Ptolemies adopted the role and iconography of the pharaoh to great success. They were also capable of developing new ways to project their power, whether through the establishment and promotion of royal cults and new deities like Serapis, or incorporating the image of splendor and abundance as part of their propaganda. In this episode, we will see how the Ptolemies successfully legitimized their rule in the eyes of both Greeks and Egyptians alike.

Toby Wilkinson, author of A World Beneath the Sands, gives a lecture on the men and women whose obsession with Egypt’s ancient civilisation drove them to uncover its secrets in the 19th and early 20th centuries. He reveals how their work helped to enrich and transform our understanding of the Nile valley and its people, and left a lasting impression on Egypt, too.

Shushma Malik discusses some of the most admired and reviled Roman emperors, and considers whether the legends surrounding them stand up to scrutiny In the latest in our series tackling the big questions on major historical topics, historian Shushma Malik responds to your questions on some of the most admired and reviled Roman emperors, and considers whether the legends surrounding them stand up to scrutiny.

Are we all living in ancient Rome? Because it kind of feels that way to us. We’re joined by Jenny Williamson, co-host of Ancient History Fangirl, to dig into how weirdly familiar gender and sexuality were 2 millennia ago in ancient Rome, and how a lot of those ideas were passed down to use today (hint: it was colonization). Along the way, we hit a lot of questions about public bathrooms and underwear, why the Roman public was so nosy about sexual positions, and dark foundational myths that kept Roman women “in line.” We visit gender-bending religious cults and their roles in slave uprisings, a mermaid goddess and feminist ducks, and our favorite Roman women: Vulvia and Cervixia. And, hey, if you don’t want to live in constant fear of slave revolts, maybe don’t build a colonial empire on slavery? Just a thought.

304 – 232 BCE – One of history’s most profoundly affected emperors who would have to turn to religion in order to combat his guilt.  Find out how Ashoka affected Buddhism and how Buddhism affected Ashoka.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends abundance, but also the arising of a disease-bearing wind.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 27, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 15 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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‎Myth Dynamite: Episode Seven: Various Artists on Apple Podcasts

Warning: there’s some talk of rape in this episode (sadly it’s quite unavoidable in myth). This week Abi and Sarah nerd-gasm HARD (yes, it’s possible for us to get MORE nerdy) because we’re bringing it back to our main man, Ovid (Latin poet of the first-century BCE/CE) and his poem, published in around 8 CE: the Metamorphoses. NOT ONLY THAT, but we also get to talk about art and artists, so basically … we’re in heaven. Yes, this episode we’re talking about ‘Ovid’s Artists’, but my goodness there are a lot of them, so technically this episode we’re talking about ‘Three Of Ovid’s Artists With A Few Scattered Along The Way’. Catchy, right?

‎Smarty Pants: #168: The Many Faces of Aeneas on Apple Podcasts

The Aeneid has a reputation: it’s the founding myth of Rome, used down the centuries to justify conquest, colonization, and the expansion of empire the world over. Although Virgil includes many voices in his epic, Aeneas’s is the one that tends to be remembered—and celebrated, especially by his putative descendant, the Emperor Augustus. But with her new translation of The Aeneid, classicist Shadi Bartsch reveals the many ways that Virgil undermines both the glory of Aeneas and the authority of collective memory, down to the very verb used to begin and end the poem. Bartsch joins us on the podcast to untangle how the story of Aeneas is actually many stories, all in conversation with one another.

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Inscribing words, reading stories (online, March 10, 2021) – Current EpigraphyCurrent Epigraphy

Online Open House | Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memories in Classical Athens | The Kosmos Society

See what’s happening today in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

SCS Calendar: Classics, Ancient History, and Classical Archaeology Webinars

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends unrest among the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 26, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Leptis Magna became a celebrated Roman city on the African shore and was the birthplace of the Emperor Septimius Severus. In this episode I chat with special guest Maria Lloyd all about how the city developed and grew. We then discuss Severus, how did he rise to power and what did he do? Politics, intrigue, betrayal and even whether it’s Leptis or Lepcis.

If a roman legionary camp was attacked, how fast could it react? Jasper gives us his opinion.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a heat wave, a shortage of water, and and outbreak of scabs on bodies.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)