#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 24, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 8 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Carol and Eric Meyers, two pre-eminent archaeologists and Biblical scholars with over 50 years of experience and leadership in their profession, discussed their archaeological work in Israel. 

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We go to the Greek island of Santorini to learn about the eruption that devastated the Minoan civilization of nearby Crete. Plus minotaurs, donkeys, Atlantis and Cretan cuisine! 

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a successful mission for a watchtower against the enemy [or something like that; it’s weird]

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Sponsored Post Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – NovemberDeep Green Permaculture

It’s November, the last month of spring, the weather is moderate, deciduous trees are in leaf again, days are warm and there’s lots of green growth in the garden. The changeable and windy weather from October continues, but now there’s also the possibility of very sudden hot weather striking without warning so it’s important to protect plants from sun and wind. Also, regularly water newly planted trees and shrubs as the hot weather and strong winds can quickly dry out the soil.

Things to Do This Month:

  • Mulch around fruit trees and plants to retain moisture in the soil and prevent water loss from evaporation (keep mulch away from plant stems and trunks as this can cause stem rot/collar rot).
  • Mulch strawberries by placing straw underneath to keep the berries off the soil.
  • Propagate strawberries from runners.
  • Plant potted fruit trees and vines (having roots, can be planted anytime, best in spring & autumn).
  • Tie growing vines back to supports or wires.
  • Propagate plants by taking softwood (green) cuttings from now till January (after which they harden off).
  • Last chance to plant evergreen shrubs and trees (this includes citrus trees).
  • In ponds and water gardens, thin out existing aquatic plants, continue planting new ones, fertilise aquatic plants and feed fish regularly.

Vegetables and Herbs to Sow:

Sow in November Harvest (weeks)
Amaranth ds 7-8
Angelica ds 18 months
Asparagus d 2-3 years
Asparagus Pea d 8-11
Beetroot ds 7-10
Borage ds 8-10
Burdock d 17-18
Cape Gooseberry ds 14-16
Carrot d 12-18
Chicory d 16-24
Chinese cabbage ds 8-10
Chives ds 7-11
Climbing beans d 9-11
Coriander d 30-45
Cucumber d 8-10
Dwarf beans d 7-10
French tarragon d 30-40 days
Globe Artichokes s 42-57
Horseradish d 16-24
Jerusalem Artichokes d 15-20
Kohlrabi d 7-10
Lemon balm s 8-10
Lettuce ds 8-12
Mustard greens d 5-8
Okra ds 11-14
Oregano s 6-8
Parsley ds 9-19
Pumpkin ds 15-20
Radish d 5-7
Rhubarb d 12 months
Rocket d 21-35 days
Rosella s 21-25
Rosemary d 12 months
Sage d 18 months
Salsify d 14-21
Silverbeet ds 7-12
Summer savory d 6-10
Sunflower ds 10-11
Sweet corn ds 11-14
Turnip d 6-9
Yacon d 25

Key:
d = sow directly into ground
s = sow in seed tray
ds = sow directly into ground or seed tray
*= frost tender
**= sow after frost

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 23, 2020

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 7 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

N.B. today we have added a new section for Classical Youtubery … it shouldn’t have previews so it shouldn’t slow down the loading of the page … enjoy

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Theatre gets its first permanent home in Rome as Pompey builds a theatre to his own glory. The story of how he was able to do that is one of wealth, pride deception and not a little ego. 

Herodotus (c. 484 – 425? BCE) has been called both “The Father of History” and “The Father of Lies.” His accounts of the ancient world, including a deep dive into all aspects of geography, biology, and culture (among many other topics), are fascinating, indispensable, and – at times – confoundingly implausible. Who was Herodotus? What can we make of his work? And is it worth reading today? In this episode of The History of Literature, Mike Palindrome, the President of the Literature Supporters Club, joins Jacke to make the case for Herodotus. 

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the arrival of a disease-bearing wind.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of November 21-22, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 6 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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When Odysseus left for the mountains, Phorkys left his cave and his harbour, and dove down into the depths of the dark sea; and in a trice, he changed his shape; became a swift-darting dolphin, which swept south along with the currents that flowed above the ocean floor…

Elisa talks about terracottas as physical images. What different sorts are there? What images were popular? She tackles the difficult questions of who used them, and what for. What do broken examples tell us? And she explains how we understand the…

Gregory Aldrete has spent 12 years studying the composition and effectiveness of this ancient armour used by many nations around the Mediterranean. To do so, he recreated the armour from scratch, using authentic materials. In this episode Gregory, Professor Emeritus from The University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, speaks with Tristan about how this armour protected one of the most powerful conquering armies of all history, despite being made of a soft fabric. 

193 – 222 – There were Five Good Emperors and then there seemed to be none.  Just how did the quality of the Princeps decline so dramatically and what pressures were responsible for making it happen?

Book Reviews

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a year of good health.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxiope ~ Classics in Landscape Mode for November 21, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 5 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

This week’s video-based gleanings; page will take a while to load:

European Association of Archaeologists

Classics and Ancient History @ Warwick

CAARI Cyprus

Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Herodotus Helpline

Pompeii Sites

Satura Lanx

Walter M. Roberts III

Digital Hammurabi

Everyday Orientalism

British School at Rome

David Amster

Parco Colosseo

Center for Hellenic Studies

Classics Now

Classics in Color

Peopling the Past

Ancient History Encyclopedia

Musa Pedestris

Dig It With Raven

RomeRep

Kentiquity

Monarchs Factory

Manchester Classical Association

Louvre

Timeline

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 20, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 5 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Murray ponders this query from Michael watching on youtube, ‘maybe a side note to this is to draw parallels with the Celtic invasions of Greece and how they fought the phalanx? Or what Hannibal learnt from his Spanish war, and how he applied that against the legions.’ 

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a brief famine.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)