Roman Temple Find from Spain (maybe)

Something seems to be lost in translation (maybe not)  in this item from the Barcelona Reporter:

The work that has lasted three weeks have also brought to light several tombs and a Roman Christian who, according to experts, could belong to some bishops or individuals from that epoch

An ancient Roman temple, discovered following the first excavations in the chancel of the church of Sant Feliu Girona.

The temple, with cross-shaped plan, apse, three naves and two side chapels, and several tombs from the sixth and seventh centuries, have appeared

This intervention is part of the European project “Sopra e sotto. Euopea La Città”, the culture program involving the City of Brindisi (Italy) as main organizer, with participation as members of L’Ecole Nationale Superiore d ‘ Architetture of Toulouse (France), the University and the city of Girona.

The work that has lasted three weeks have also brought to light several tombs and a Roman Christian who, according to experts, could belong to some bishops or individuals from that epoch. Professor Josep Maria Nolla, archaeologist and head of the excavations, said human remains have not been found, suggesting that the bodies were moved elsewhere.

“A number of graves, fairly well preserved, were discovered but not a single human fragment”. The expert stressed that they found wood and nails, so someone had been buried in a coffin, but when they dismantled the old church to build the new, it seems they picked up all these skeletal remains and bury them elsewhere”.

The European project has benefited Girona as it focuses on finding solutions to some of the problems faced by medium sized cities in finding their past history and town planning where the exploitation of archaeological sites of interest are in the midst of urban fabric.

Some Spanish coverage from La Vanguardia also mention this temple in the shape of a cross, but that doesn’t seem Roman, does it? Perhaps they mean Byzantine/Late Roman?

via An ancient Roman temple, discovered in the chancel of the church of Sant Feliu Girona..

Also Seen – Greek Milton? Milton’s Greek?

The Seattle p-i has a reviewish sort of thing of an exhibition at Princeton of images various authors, including this one of Milton:

via Seattle p-i

William Marshall’s 1645 Engraving Of John Milton.

This portrait, produced for John Milton’s first published book of verse, includes the writer’s opinion of his likeness in the caption. Written in ancient Greek–which the artist could not understand–Milton invited the reader to “laugh at the artist’s botched attempt” at portraiture.

via Famous Authors Drawn, Not Quartered.

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