AJA Reviews

Latest reviews from the American Journal of Archaeology

From the Harpy Tomb to the Wonders of Ephesus: British Archaeologists in the Ottoman Empire 1840-1880
By Debbie Challis
Reviewed by Deborah Harlan

The British Consular Service in the Aegean and the Collection of Antiquities for the British Museum
By Lucia Patrizio Gunning
Reviewed by Deborah Harlan

Zooarchaeology
By Elizabeth J. Reitz and Elizabeth S. Wing
Reviewed by Michael MacKinnon

Quantitative Paleozoology
By R. Lee Lyman
Reviewed by Michael MacKinnon

Ancient Technology
By John W. Humphrey
Reviewed by Thilio Rehren

Hot Pursuit: Integrating Anthropology in Search of Ancient Glass-Blowers
By Alysia Fischer
Reviewed by Janet Duncan Jones

New Approaches to Old Stones: recent Studies of Ground Stone Artifacts
By Yorke M. Rowan and Jennie R. Ebeling
Reviewed by Andrew Bevan

Assyrian Stone Vessels and Related Material in the British Museum
By Ann Searight, Julian Reade, and Irving Finkel
Reviewed by Andrew Bevan

Akh Purattim. Vol. 2, Les rives de l’Euphrate
By Jean-Claude Margueron, Olivier Rouault, and Pierre Lombard
Reviewed by Edgar Peltenburg

Jordan: An Archaeological Reader
By Russell B. Adams
Reviewed by Peter M. Fischer

The Cost of Death: The Social and Economic Value of Ancient Egyptian Funerary Art in the Rameside Period
By Kathlyn M. Cooney
Reviewed by Karen Exell

The Cave of the Cyclops: Mesolithic and Neolithic Networks in the Northern Aegean, Greece. Vol. 1, Intra-Site Analysis, Local Industries, and Regional Site Distribution
By Adamantios Sampson
Reviewed by Nikos Efstratiou

Burning Bulls, Broken Bones: Sacrificial Ritual in the Context of Palace Period Minoan Religion
By Robert James Cromarty
Reviewed by Nanno Marinatos

Monastiraki Katalimata: Excavation of a Cretan Refuge Site, 1993-2000
By Krzysztof Nowicki
Reviewed by Barbara J. Hayden

Testing the Hinterland: The Work of the Boeotia Survey (1989-1991) in the Southern Approaches to the City of Thespiai
By John Bintliff, Phil Howard, and Anthony Snodgrass
Reviewed by David K. Pettigrew

Greek Sculpture: Function, Materials, and Techniques in the Archaic and Classical Periods
By Olga Palagia
Reviewed by Hilda E. Westervelt

Corpus der boiotischen Grab- und Weihreliefs des 6. Bis 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr.
By Valia Schild-Xenidou
Reviewed by Geoff Adams

Distorted Ideals in Greek Vase-Painting: The World of Mythological Burlesque
By David Walsh
Reviewed by Tyler Jo Smith

Historische Landeskunde und Epigraphik in Griechenland: Akten des Symposiums veranstaltet aus Anlass des 100. Todestages von H.G. Lolling (1848-1894) in Athen vom 28. Bis 30.9.1994
By Klaus Fittschen
Reviewed by Gerald V. Lalonde

Theoroi and Initiates in Samothrace: The Epigraphical Evidence
By Nora M. Dimitrova
Reviewed by Kathryn Simonsen

Tebtynis IV: Les Habitations à l’est du temple de Soknebtynis
By Gisèle Hadji-Minaglou
Reviewed by Nicola Aravecchia

Constructions of Childhood in Ancient Greece and Italy
By Ada Cohen and Jeremy B. Rutter
Reviewed by Barbara A. Olsen

Roman Pottery: Fine Ware Imports
By John W. Hayes
Reviewed by George W.M. Harrison

La Gaule narbonnaise: De la conquête romaine au III siècle apr. J.-C.
By Pierre Gros
Reviewed by Caroline Downing

Bet She’an. Vol. 1, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Caesareum and the Odeum
By Gabriel Mazor and Arfan Najjar
Reviewed by Moshe Fischer

Field O: The "Synagogue" Site
By Marylinda Govaars, Marie Spiro, and L. Michael White
Reviewed by Jodi Magness

Petra, The Mountain of Aaron: The Finnish Archaeological Project in Jordan. Vol. 1, The Church and the Chapel
By Zbigniew T. Fiema and Jaakko Frösén
Reviewed by Bert de Vries

Museum Review

Masterpieces of Ancient Jewelry: Exquisite Objects from the Cradle of Civilization
Reviewed by Megan Cifarelli

JOB: Generalist/Hellenist @ UGa

Seen on Classics (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

The Department of Classics at the University of Georgia invites applications
for a Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics. The term of the appointment
is one year, with the possibility of renewal.

We seek a broadly-trained generalist to teach all levels of Latin, Greek and
Classical Culture, with a special emphasis in Greek. Candidates must have
received the Ph.D. by the time of the appointment (Aug. 1, 2010). The
teaching load is 3-3, and the salary is $40,000.

Interested candidates should send a letter of application and a complete
dossier, including CV, transcripts, and three letters of reference. Email
applications may be sent electronically to
classics AT uga.edu<classicssearch AT uga.edu>

. Address regular or express mail to:

Chair, Classics Search Committee

Department of Classics, Park Hall

University of Georgia

Athens, GA 30602-6203

Applications received by March 10, 2010 are assured of consideration
(postmark for regular or express mail); however, all dossiers will be
accepted until the position is filled. Preliminary interviews of selected
candidates will be conducted at the CAMWS meeting in Oklahoma City.

The University of Georgia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action
employer.

Citanda: Digressus 10 Articles

New at Digressus:

  • Efi Papadodima, “The Greek/Barbarian Interaction in Euripides’ Andromache, Orestes, Heracleidae:
  • A Reassessment of Greek Attitudes to Foreigners” 10.1-42
  • Review: Michael Vickers, Sophocles and Alcibiades: Athenian Politics in Ancient Greek Literature. Stocksfield: Acumen (2008). Reviewed by T. V. Buttrey. 10.43-49
  • Reina Pereirag, “Orquídeas: Ensaio sobre a Intimidadena Antiguidade Clássica” 10.50-96

via Digressus, the internet journal for the Classical World.

CONF: Ancient Greek Drama: contemporary approaches & education

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

Hellenic Theatre/Drama & Education Network, in collaboration with the European Network of Research and Documentation of Performances of Ancient Greek Drama (Arc-Net), Michael Cacoyannis Foundation, Goethe Institute in Athens, Swedish Institute in Athens, The Embassy of Sweden, Department of Early Childhood Education-National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, the Embassy of Cyprus, the Dutch Institute in Athens, the Hellenic Centre of the International Theatre Institute, the Educational Television, the British Council in Greece, the Finnish Institute in Athens and other arts and educational organizations organizes international symposium entitled

«Ancient Greek Drama: contemporary approaches & education»

on the 26th-30th of March 2010 in Athens.

A number of prominent international researchers and theatre practitioners are taking part with lectures, discussions, practical workshops, and master classes.

The aim of the Symposium is to accommodate and foster dialogue concerning contemporary research and professional practice related to ancient drama and education (formal and non-formal).

It can be attended by teachers, artists, theatrologists, students of theatre and of education, and anyone who is interested in ancient Greek drama and education.

POSTSYMPOSIUMMASTERCLASSES

On Tuesday, 30 March 2010, two master classes will take place in Athens.

1. Michael Meschke, Emeritus Professor in Puppet Theatre, Stockholm, Sweden

2. Dr Maria Zannetou-Papacosta, drama/theatre educator, Primary School Principal, Cyprus

More information soon at www.Theatroedu.gr

Symposium languages: Greek & English

Submission of applications begins: 1st of February 2010

Places are limited. (Strict) order of priority will be observed.

Registration fee includes attendance in Keynotes speeches, participation in Workshops, light lunch on Saturday, Sunday and Monday, coffee at breaks, programme, and symposium material.

info: symposium2010 AT theatroedu.gr , (Natasha Merkouri) nm_558 AT hotmail.com

CONF: 2010 Classical Association Conference, Cardiff

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

Registration is currently open for the 2010 Classical Association Conference in Cardiff. The full programme and booking form are available from the conference website at:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/hisar/newsandevents/ancienthistory/2010-ca-conference-programme-and-booking-form.html

Bookings should be made by 26th February to avoid incurring a late booking fee.

CONF: ‘Mediterranean Identities: Formation and Transformation’, University of Leicester, 26-28 March 2010

Seen on Classicists (please send any responses to the folks mentioned in the quoted text, not to rogueclassicism!):

Dear All,

We are pleased to announce that registration for this conference (see the email below) is now open: the registration form and full details of the programme are available at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics/research/conferences/mediterranean.aspx. We ask that registration forms be returned to us together with payment not later than Wednesday 10th March. Please note that lunch and refreshments only are included in the conference fee: a list of local accommodation is available on the project website, www.mediterraneanidentities.com.

Student Bursaries

Thanks to the generosity of the Classical Association, we are able to offer six student bursaries covering the full conference fee, which are available to postgraduate students; preference may be given to doctoral students, but students on Masters programmes may also apply. If you would like to be considered for one of these bursaries, please email me (mark.bradley AT nottingham.ac.uk) with details of your affiliation, year of study and research topic, and a statement of how you believe the conference will contribute to the development of your research. It would be most helpful if you could do this by Wednesday 3rd March.

You can also apply to the Thomas Wiedemann Memorial Fund (http://www.thomaswiedemann.org.uk/) for a contribution towards the cost of travel and registration; please note that applications should be made within the next few weeks, and that you should normally seek half of your expenses from your own institution, which, if you are successful, the Wiedemann Trust will aim to meet.