#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 25, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 19 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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To fight against the Roman empire and then make an alliance with them took a certain courage and tenacity. In this episode we are introduced to Mavia, the warrior queen of the semi-nomadic Tanukhids, who did just that. Dr. Emran El-Badawi, associate professor of Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Houston, takes us through the things we know and the things that are speculated about Mavia. Emran also places her within the context of the 4th and 5th centuries CE, and discusses her legacy and connections to Moses.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends misery as a result of misfortunes.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 23, 2021

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 17 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Some things are eternal. What does Persephone have in common with Sidney Prescott? Or Antigone with Marion Crane? Let Vanessa tell you all about it… Find more about Vanessa’s study of horror in myth and Greek tragedy here, and follow her on Twitter for more. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

Saab in diciōnem Americānōrum redditus; Americānī in Haitiā captīvī; Colin Powell vītā functus; Sīnēnsēs in caelō; Alitalia dēcoxit; Carmen Mola dētecta; Catulus servātus.

If you are a beginner / lower intermediate Latin learner, and reading Seneca’s first letter to Lucilius (on the use of time) in the original version, and ACTUALLY understand it, is something you are looking forward to, then this free course is for you. And if you are a passionate teacher searching for new, engaging teaching methods for your students, then this course is also for you.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends the people being incredibly happy. [Sunday] If it thunders today, it portends discord among those in power leading to the common folk oppressing others.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 22, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 16 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Their love affair has fascinated us for ages. In this episode, learn about the beginning of Antony and Cleopatra. Cleopatra put on possibly the greatest PR display of all time and even from here, 2000 years later, I assure Antony didn’t stand a chance.

Thanks to Paul for sending this in, ‘what is one battle where sources agree but you don’t?’ It is a great question and one we may revisit on a full episode of the podcast.

…. In this episode I talk to Prof. Eric Cline about the discipline of archaeology and his book 1177 BC where he talks about the late Bronze Age world and the Collapse it would suffer. He details the various evidence that has shown itself in the historical record to help us understand what was happing during this world changing period of time…

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends bad weather and an outbreak of skin diseases among the people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 21, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 15 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Was life for our ancient ancestors brutish and short or did they exist as noble savages free and living in harmony with nature and each other? Many of our assumptions about ancient societies stem from renaissance theories about how society should be organized and what civilisation is. Dan is joined by David Wengrow, Professor of Comparative Archaeology at University College London and co-author of The Dawn of Everything to challenge some of these assumptions and show that they were founded on critiques of European society. David shines a light on the great variety of ancient civilisations, the different models of society they offer and how that might influence us today.

Gold and horses! 2,500 years ago, in the area of the Great Steppe that is now Eastern Kazakhstan, an extraordinary ancient Scythian culture reigned supreme. They were called the Saka, renowned for their skill as horse archers and for their elaborate elite burials. Ancient Persian and Greek sources labelled them a barbaric, nomadic people – a scourge on the ‘civilised’ world. But new archaeological discoveries from East Kazakhstan are revealing a very different picture. A picture that highlights how the Saka were a highly-sophisticated ancient society. A culture that boasted complex settlements, expert craftsmen, extensive trade routes and more, alongside their equine mastery and their staggering wealth. Now, for a limited time only, you can see some of these newly-discovered artefacts at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. The exhibition is called ‘Gold of the Great Steppe’. Running from 28th September 2021 to 30th January 2022, it is the first exhibition about this ancient culture ever to be shown in the UK. To find out more about the exhibition and what these newly-discovered artefacts are revealing about the Saka, Tristan headed up to Cambridge to interview Dr Rebecca Roberts, associated curator of ‘Gold of the Great Steppe’.

We’re back at Troy, where shirts are optional, digging up an artifact from a bygone era: late 90’s television. Joined by the wonderful Dr. Deborah Beck, expert Homerist from UT Austin, we we break down the 1997 Hallmark miniseries, The Odyssey. This movie, by its director’s own omission hones in on the action-adventure aspects of Homer’s Odyssey. But, we scholars ruminate, are those really the best parts of the story? We mediate again on the pitfalls of sticking to the plot of a story while missing its larger themes. We also tackle two of the great questions of our time: Iliad or Odyssey and who had the best mullet?

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends coughing sicknesses and cardiac issues.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 20, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XIII  Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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In part one of our Halloween special, Kara and Jordan delve into all things *spooky*. Did the ancient Egyptians believe in ghosts? How did the living and the dead interact? What happened to you when you died? Did they have a concept of the soul?

Jeff and Dave wade into the Olympic-sized pool that is Ovid’s masterpiece, the Metamorphoses. After untangling etymological tendrils of the word “vignette”, the guys dive right in. First up, “Apollo and Daphne”. Not happy with Apollo’s arch trash-talk, Cupid shows him who’s really the boss—his arrows unleash unstoppable passion and malodorous disdain between the titular two. This is not the chubby bowman on your Valentine’s card. Then it’s on to “Diana and Actaeon”. What’s the message here? Another defense of chastity? Haunting comment on the goddess’ sacredness? Is Ovid alluding to his own error or the recent Roman past? Maybe he’s whelping on the very conventions of epic? Come on in, the water’s fine, but be careful where you dogpaddle.

Where does religion come from? How did hunter-gatherers build early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey? What’s with the gigantic carved stone pillars and the defleshed human skulls anyway? What is religion, really? Why am I asking you? It’s an episode as profound as it is, well, mystifying.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the reopening of old grievances and for many, extreme suffering as a result.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)