Classics Confidential: Daniela Manetti on Ancient Medicine

I think I’ll include the original description with these Classics Confidential posts …

This week’s interview features Professor Daniela Manetti from the University of Florence, who at the time of filming was visiting the Humboldt University in Berlin as part of the research programme ‘Medicine of the Mind, Philosophy of the Body: Discourses of Health and Well-Being in the Ancient World’. Professor Manetti has published on a wide variety of ancient medical texts, but in this conversation she focuses on the intriguing papyrus fragment known to us as the Anonymus Londinensis, which was found in Egypt and bought by the British Library in 1889. This text, which discusses the multiple causes of illness, is a treasure trove for ancient medical historians, but it also gives us a unique and precious insight into the processes of ancient textual composition. www.classicsconfidential.co.uk

European Review Freebies on Ancient Medicine

This is another Cambridge Journals thing … the European Review has an issue on ancient medicine and the following are free (all the papers are pdf):

  • Heikki Solin, Was there a Medical School at Salerno in Roman Times?
  • Vivian Nutton, Galen and Roman Medicine: or can a Greek become a Latin?
  • Lola Ferre, The Jewish Contribution to the Transmission of the Classical Legacy
  • Gotthard Strohmaier, Arabic Medicine: Continuation of Greek Tradition and Innovation

… it seems easiest to access them here

Dissection in Early Alexandria

Very interesting item at History in an Hour … here’s a tease:

During the third century BCE, the city of Alexandria was home to a remarkable event in the development of ancient medicine as two physicians, named Herophilus and Erasistratus, conducted ground-breaking investigations into internal human anatomy. This research was important not only because it corrected many ancient misconceptions about the body, but because the doctors are believed to have reached their conclusions by dissecting human corpses, a practice outlawed in the Ancient World.

Here’s the rest: