ICYMI ~ The Classical World in the News: February 1-February 14, 2016

Excerpted from my Explorator Newsletter:

Evidence of silver mining near the Mycenean acropolis at Thorikos, some 5000 years b.p.:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160210110630.htm
http://phys.org/news/2016-02-years-silver-shores-aegean-sea.html
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-02/gu-s5y021016.php

Tracing the source of marble preserved underwater at Baia:

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-manganese-source-submerged-roman-marble.html
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160210110802.htm
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-02/f-sf-lam021016.php
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/02/2016/discovering-the-source-of-marble-used-in-roman-buildings

Very interesting Roman fresco found in London:

http://www.mola.org.uk/blog/discovery-ornate-roman-fresco-revealed
http://artdaily.com/news/84809/Roman-fresco-hidden-beneath-the-streets-of-London-uncovered-by-archaeologists-
https://news.artnet.com/art-world/roman-wall-painting-discovered-in-london-419891

Remains of a major temple with a huge arcade at Colchester:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/environment/archaeology/12150373/Remains-of-extraordinary-Roman-arcade-found-in-Colchester.html
http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/extraordinary_roman_arcade_found_in_colchester_is_greatest_find_of_its_kind_1_4412792
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3440402/Enormous-Roman-arcade-Essex-magnificent-temple-400ft-long-arched-structure-largest-kind-UK.html
http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/14265990.display/

Roman road found during Hadrian Wall car park construction:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-35511868

A Roman canal system near the Dead Sea:

http://www.algemeiner.com/2016/02/03/roman-era-canal-system-unearthed-near-dead-sea/
http://www.israelhayom.com/site/newsletter_article.php?id=31531

A Roman brooch with an interesting palindrome:

http://www.livescience.com/53663-ancient-roman-brooch-contains-lovely-palindrome.html

In case you missed the ‘ancient Greek laptop’ silliness:

http://www.livescience.com/53629-greek-statue-not-using-laptop.html
http://news.discovery.com/history/archaeology/no-the-ancient-greeks-didnt-have-laptops-160205.htm
http://www.forbes.com/sites/kristinakillgrove/2016/02/04/no-thats-not-a-laptop-on-an-ancient-greek-grave-marker/#1ec8c885348a

Feature on finds from Tuva (these seem to be Scythian):

http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/f0212-focus-on-tuva-stunning-treasures-and-macabre-slaughter-in-siberias-prehistoric-valley-of-the-kings/

… while the ‘Ice Princess’ reburial didn’t work out:

http://siberiantimes.com/other/others/news/n0574-legal-bid-fails-to-rebury-remains-of-2500-year-old-tattooed-ice-princess/

Feature on the restored pyramid of Cestius:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/04/romes-lonely-pyramid-of-cestius-gets-a-new-lease-of-life
http://news.yahoo.com/2-000-old-rome-pyramid-getting-visibility-cleanup-175141163.html
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/2000-year-old-rome-pyramid-getting-visibility-after-cleanup/2016/02/03/317c7338-ca9f-11e5-b9ab-26591104bb19_story.html

Isotope analysis on a pile of 2000 years b.p. burials from Rome suggest there was a large immigrant population:

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-clues-human-migration-imperial-rome.html
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160210165705.htm
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-02/p-cah020516.php
http://www.livescience.com/53674-first-migrants-to-imperial-rome.html
http://www.livescience.com/53672-photos-migrants-to-ancient-rome.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3440906/Who-Rome-s-mystery-immigrants-Skeletons-ancient-cemetery-travelled-city-North-Africa-Alps-2-000-years-ago.html
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2016/0211/Who-walked-the-roads-to-Rome-Isotopes-provide-clues
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0147585

… related:

http://phys.org/news/2016-02-humans-migrants.html

Studying the ‘life cycle’ of Roman pottery:

http://news.uark.edu/articles/33521/u-of-a-researchers-help-capture-lifecycle-of-roman-pottery

Plans to restore an important Temple of Augustus in Turkey:

http://www.todayszaman.com/national_ministry-launches-projects-to-restore-ancient-roman-temple_411378.html

Very interesting frescoes emerging from a church find in Cappadocia:

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/historic-church-discovered-in-turkeys-nevsehir-could-change-history-of-orthodoxy.aspx?pageID=238&nID=94309&NewsCatID=375

Some ancient school lessons:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/12152081/Ancient-Greek-manuscript-reveal-Roman-life-lessons.html
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/feb/10/ancient-greek-manuscripts-reveal-life-lessons-from-the-roman-empire

Some Cheshire Roman hoards are on display:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-merseyside-35560821

I think we mentioned this new mosaic:

http://www.apollo-magazine.com/this-is-the-best-of-the-roman-tradition-a-new-mosaic-unveiled-in-israel/

Nice feature on the Lazarus project:

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/lazarus-project-the-scientists-who-are-deciphering-unreadable-ancient-texts

Concerns for Amphipolis:

http://www.ekathimerini.com/205895/article/ekathimerini/life/who-will-save–amphipolis

Conservation costs at Rome:

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20160202-the-colossal-cost-of-ancient-rome

A Kyrenia ship update:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2016/02/04/project-being-launched-to-protect-kyrenia-shipwreck/

Bi-communal Kyrenia shipwreck protection project

… and a Mazotos shipwreck update:

http://cyprus-mail.com/2016/02/07/a-wreck-of-historic-importance/

LiDAR locates some ‘lost’ Roman roads in the UK:

http://news.yahoo.com/lost-roads-ancient-rome-discovered-3d-laser-scanners-161559393.html
http://www.livescience.com/53681-roman-roads-discovered-lidar-maps.html
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3436936/Britain-s-lost-Roman-roads-discovered-2-000-years-Maps-reveal-new-key-route-used-conquer-Northern-England.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

On the Greeks and MLK Jr:

http://www.rawstory.com/2016/02/how-the-ancient-greeks-contributed-to-martin-luther-king-jr-s-fight-against-racism/
http://news.holycross.edu/blog/2016/02/03/martin-luther-king-jr-in-dialogue-with-the-ancient-greeks/

Plato is still high on college reading lists:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/02/03/what-ivy-league-students-are-reading-that-you-arent/

A tenure dispute of interest:

http://cookcountyrecord.com/stories/510662929-former-uic-greek-studies-professor-says-colleagues-torpedoed-tenure-application-demands-4-million

On Alexander the Great’s feeling about beards:

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/03/off-with-their-beards/426873/

Pondering Homer:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2016/feb/09/can-homers-iliad-speak-across-the-centuries

The annual Super Bowl and Roman numeral opEds:

http://www.newsweek.com/super-bowl-50-nfl-423478
http://wbt.com/latin-teacher-not-happy-about-super-bowl-not-using-roman-numerals/
http://harrisondaily.com/opinion/david-holsted-thinking-xxiv-vii-ccclxv-about-roman-numerals/article_b33b88cc-c9fb-11e5-a6ab-cfe6edb7a8dc.html

Something about the Zeugma mosaics:

http://www.dailysabah.com/history/2016/02/09/anatolian-mosaics-to-be-presented-to-the-world

On Roman ‘half time’ shows:

http://www.livescience.com/53615-horrors-of-the-colosseum.html

What Nevzat Cevik is up to:

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/Default.aspx?pageID=238&nID=94890&NewsCatID=375

What David Mulroy is up to:

http://wuwm.com/post/local-scholars-translation-aeschylus-agamemnon-makes-classic-more-accessible

More pondering of what ‘Classic’ should be/is:

http://dailyprincetonian.com/news/2016/02/thinking-about-names-and-classics/

More on York ‘gladiator’ DNA and related things:

http://3dprint.com/116934/gladiators-in-britain/

More on Minoan shipwrecks:

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/archaeologists-find-bronze-age-shipwreck-off-turkeys-southwest-.aspx?pageID=238&nID=94665&NewsCatID=375
http://news.az/articles/turkey/104823

Review of Whitmarsh, *Battling the Gods*:

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/books/2016/02/who-were-first-atheists

Review of Beard, *SPQR*:

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/spqr-review-mary-beard-explains-why-ancient-rome-still-matters-20160129-gmham3.html
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/saturdayextra/europe-and-the-limits-of-the-roman-legacy/7148524

————

The complete issue is available at: Explorator 18.41-42 ~ February 14, 2016 |
https://exploratornews.wordpress.com/2016/02/14/explorator-18-41-42-february-14-2016/

ICYMI ~ The Classical World in the News ~ January 12-17, 2016

[I’m thinking of making this a regular feature]

The Ancient Greece and Rome section of my Explorator newsletter for this week (full issue available here):

Horse burials from an 8th century necropolis in Athens:

http://www.amna.gr/english/article/12498/Intact-horse-skeleton-discovered-in-ancient-cemetery-in-southern-coastal-Athens
http://horsetalk.co.nz/2016/01/16/horse-skeletons-ancient-greek-cemetery/#axzz3xVa3dQu4

Plenty of evidence found during A1 construction suggests the Romans were in Yorkshire a decade earlier than previously thought:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-35314396
http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/our-yorkshire/heritage/spectacular-discoveries-could-put-romans-in-yorkshire-a-decade-before-they-settled-in-york-1-7676043
http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/14205317.display/
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3401618/Treasure-trove-Roman-artefacts-A1-Pots-beads-jewellery-177-000-pieces-unearthed-roadworks.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Remains of a Bronze Age village near Aquileia:

http://www.thelocal.it/20160113/bronze-age-village-found-near-ancient-roman-city

Nice feature on some Greek pots at Yale:

https://yalealumnimagazine.com/articles/4177/at-home-in-ancient-athens

Bice Peruzzi is studying burial practices in Central Apulia:

http://www.uc.edu/news/NR.aspx?id=22681
http://phys.org/news/2016-01-ancient-burial-rituals-lot.html
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-01/uoc-abr011116.php
http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/01/2016/the-changing-burials-rites-in-pre-roman-central-apulian-region

That Bodicacia inscription is now in the Corinium Museum:

http://www.wiltsglosstandard.co.uk/news/14204968.UPDATE__Bodicacia_tombstone_arrives_at_Corinium_Museum/

Studying/recreating Greek pottery:

http://www.baltimoresun.com/health/bs-hs-greek-vases-20160117-story.html

Feature on the Battle of Watling street and other Boudiccan things:

http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/west-midlands-location-britains-bloodiest-10739813

Roman London was a pretty cosmopolitan place:

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/01/2016/roman-londons-cosmopolitan-history-revealed

Lessons from the Iliad:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/01/160110-homer-iliad-ancient-world-alexander-ngbooktalk/

They drained the Great Bath at Bath:

http://www.bathchronicle.co.uk/Great-Bath-Roman-Baths/story-28511353-detail/story.html

On black Classicists:

http://www.bu.edu/today/2016/black-classics-scholars-an-untold-story/

Review of Holland, *Dynasty*:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/08/books/review-dynasty-tom-hollands-chronicle-of-the-first-five-emperors-who-ruled-ancient-rome.html

More on Knossos being larger than previously thought:

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/ancient-city-was-three-times-bigger-archaeologists-suspected-180957759/

More on Roman toilets and parasites:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/roman-sanitation-didn-t-stop-roaming-parasites/?WT.mc_id=SA_syn_RDFRS

January 1, 2016 … the Resolution

I’m not a big fan of New Year’s Resolutions –I’ve never been quite sure why this particular point of revolving around the sun should have special meaning for changing up something in one’s life — but I think I’ll actually make one anyway in regards to this blog. Over the past couple of years, the workload of being a teacher has expanded astronomically, not on the teaching side, but on the (usually pointless) paperwork side which generally has left me in a state in which mental fuzziness makes blogging improbable. To keep my sanity, I have been, of course, posting and reposting a pile of items on Twitter (@rogueclassicist) which would once have been put in this blog (e.g. BMCR reviews,  links to news stories, etc.)  and for the past few months have been trying to regularly incorporate them in blog form has they sort of give a snapshot of what’s going on in the Classical world on any given day. I’ve tried to keep up with This Day in Ancient History postings for the past while as well, adding some ‘value’ with additional dates pertaining to some of the ‘big names’ in our field from the past. The past couple of months have demonstrated that this is ‘doable’ with my current workload.

With all that, however, I am increasingly bothered that I haven’t been able to comment on many of the news items that are out there and, to paraphrase Juvenal, difficile est non bloggam scribere on a regular basis. And so, over the past couple of weeks or so I’ve sort of come up with a plan which will form the basis of my  ‘resolution’.  Basically it goes something like this:

  1. Most of the links etc. will continue to be posted on Twitter as they have for the past couple of years; the Repititiationes posts will continue in ‘next day’ format as they have for the past while
  2. This Day in Ancient History will continue to be posted on a daily basis
  3. Many news items — especially press releases — from the ‘source’ (i.e. a university press release, in most cases) will be posted whenever relevant and anything added by the popular press in their interpretations will be noted
  4. Some news items may be rewritten by me  from time to time (a la the Daily Mail or Huffington Post), with full citations of sources etc.
  5. Whenever possible (and I want this to be the main thing), I am going to comment on the news coverage that is just plain silly … I used to do that a lot and I think it was a good thing for all concerned.

So that’s the resolution … we’ll see how well I can do with fulfilling it. Happy New Year y’all. We’re back.

Quotable: The Poetic Benefits of Latin

Frances Myatt in the Guardian, inter alia:

While drama also taught me the various names used to describe the form and structure of poetry, it was Latin that really taught me how poetry worked. It was in Latin lessons that we studied in detail why that word was next to that one, how having a verb at the beginning of a line affected the feeling of the poem, or why an unusual word gave a unique flavour to the piece of writing. The rigour of translating from Latin to English, and having to think about how to convey the effect of structure, word order, alliteration and so on, helped me understand poetry like nothing else. In one lesson our Latin teacher even got us to write our own poems in English, so that the process of creation would help us understand the Latin poetry we were reading. Writing your own poetry is a brilliant way of coming to appreciate poetry, but while we wrote poetry in Latin classes, in 12 years of English lessons I only wrote a poem once.

Speaking of Pompey’s Murder …

As part of our ‘Grand Tour’ this summer, our relatives took us to the Chateau  de Modave, which is in the province of Liege in Belgium and is a fine example of what the ‘second’ and ‘third’ tier nobility of the Renaissance would have enjoyed as a country house. Amongst several items of Classical interest (which we’ll return to, as time allows), is a rather large tapestry depicting the presentation of Pompey’s head to Julius Caesar:

thumb_IMG_1607_1024

photo D. Meadows

Interesting how ‘Renaissance’ the Romans look and how ‘eastern’ Pompey’s head seems to look … notice the bundle of fasces in the crowd at the back … the city in the background looks like Liege (the twin towers of St Bart’s)  … and is that a ‘pygmy’ delivering the goods? So much going on in this one ……