Some Pompeii Stuff

We’ll start with a video  from the BBC and with a focus on what the people died from:

… and then remind folks of a Scientific American blog on the subject (which includes another one of our fave videos):

… and now that you’re interested (as if you weren’t), we’ll remind folks of the Ancient World Open Bibliography on the subject:

… and in case you didn’t see it in the Scientific American thing up there:

ED: Vesuvian Archaeology Courses

I’ve seen this one in various places (this particular text is via the Classicists list):

New courses for university students: Discover the ancient Romans in the shadow of Vesuvius!

The Herculaneum Centre www.herculaneumcentre.org  is very pleased to announce the launch of a new series of university-level courses related to Vesuvian archaeology that will take place in September 2012 and March 2013, with learning mostly taking place at the sites themselves.

The Vesuvian Archaeology Study Programme has been specifically designed to meet the needs of university students. The programme content is suitable for students of Roman history, archaeology, architecture, history of art and material culture. Students of heritage management and conservation will find the programme offers stimulating case studies that explore the role archaeological sites play in the modern world and the challenges of conserving them.

Participants will visit Pompeii, Herculaneum and Oplontis, lesser known sites such as Villa Sora, as well as exploring the Vesuvius National Park and the National Archaeology Museum in Naples. This rich programme will be led by Dr Joanne Berry, scholar and author of The Complete Pompeii (Thames and Hudson, 2007) and founder of Blogging Pompeii, with input from a range of other scholars and practitioners active in the field.

We bring together the best of our three partners: the Comune di Ercolano (the town council) offers us a network of local partners and resources, the Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei (the local heritage authority) ties us to the archaeological site which is used as an open-air classroom, and the British School at Rome offers connections to international and research communities.

Details of the courses can be found at www.herculaneumcentre.org, and a leaflet and application form are available to be downloaded on the British School at Rome website http://www.bsr.ac.uk/courses-for-university-students-shadow-of-vesuvius.

Please forward this information to your students!

Another Wall Collapse at Pompeii

Not sure whether this will make it out of the Italian press … the La Repubblica coverage briefly mentions the collapse of an interior wall of a house without one of those fancy schmancy names in Regio V … the area wasn’t open to the public:

Ancora un crollo all’interno degli Scavi di Pompei. L’ennesimo cedimento nel sito archeologico più grande del mondo è avvenuto ieri pomeriggio. Ha riguardato una parte non estesa di un muro di cinta all’interno di una domus senza nome della Regio V. L’area era stata già interdetta al pubblico.

La Soprintendenza Archeologica Speciale di Napoli e Pompei ha confermato il cedimento del muro – di età romana, intonacato. L’area in cui il muro è crollato sarà oggetto di bandi per il restauro. «Stiamo lavorando per la messa in sicurezza anche in questa zona», dice la soprintendente archeologa di Napoli e Pompei, Teresa Elena Cinquantaquattro, che ha redatto un’informativa sul cedimento. Una relazione è stata inviata anche ai carabinieri.

Nei giorni scorsi il Napoletano è stato flagellato da piogge abbondanti che sono probabilmente tra le concause del cedimento.

via: Pompei, ancora un crollo all’interno degli Scavi (La Repubblica)

More coverage:

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem ix kalendas septembres

A map showing the cities and towns affected by...
Image via Wikipedia
ante diem ix kalendas septembres

  • rites in honour of Luna at the Graecostasis
  • mundus patet — the mundus was a ritual pit which had a sort of vaulted cover on it. Three times a year the Romans removed this cover (August 24, Oct. 5 and November eighth) at which time the gates of the underworld were considered to be opened and the manes (spirits of the dead) were free to walk the streets of Rome.
  • 72 A.D. — martyrdom of Batholomew at Albanopolis
  • 79 A.D. — Vesuvius erupts, burying Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae
  • 410 A.D. — Alaric sacks Rome
  • 1971 — death of Carl Blegen (excavator of Pylos)
  • 1997 — death of Philip Vellacott