#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 18, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XV Kal. Iun. 2772 AUC ~ 26 Mounichion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Who was Spartacus, really? It’s not an easy question to answer. The ancient sources agree that he was Thracian, but even this is up for debate. Still, we’re going to go out on a limb and say that to know Spartacus, you have to know the Thracians. The Thracians were a fierce warrior people, consummate mercenaries who fought in every major Greek and Roman war—and believed that they would never die. Join us as we try to breathe life into these epic people by exploring their unique mythology and religious beliefs.

In today’s special guest episode, I am joined by director and screenwriter Esme von Hoffman (Festival of Cinema NYC 2019 Winner for Best Director) for her film, Ovid and the Art of Love. Esme and I discuss her background with Classics and Roman history, what drew her to make a film about the life of Ovid, her artistic vision in adapting the film to a modern audience, and some of the decisions that she made in writing its script.

Arguably the most popular of the Hellenistic philosophies, the Stoic movement, with its emphasis on reason and self-control, attracted several famous figures such as the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, the Macedonian king Antigonus II Gonatas, and Seneca the Younger. Believing that wisdom is the highest good and can be achieved through philosophy, the Stoics encouraged the rejection of emotion and the embrace of rationality as a way to live in accordance with nature, which was granted an innate sense of orderliness and reason thanks to the embodiment of the cosmos by a rational deity.

Book Reviews

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends discord and from that will come a shortage of daily necessities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of May 16-17, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XVI Kal. Iun. 2772 AUC ~ 25 Mounichion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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The final conspiracy against Caligula involved Cassius Chaerea, an officer of the Praetorian Guard; Callistus, Caligula’s wealthy freedman adviser; and the senator Lucius Annius Vinicianus. Over the next three episodes, we’ll explore whether or not the conspiracy was about getting rid of Caligula because he was batshit crazy – or because they wanted to restore the Republic.

Ian McNeice played the Newsreader in Rome, a character who bought both a flourish and much needed exposition to the Roman forum!

Landscape Modery

note: as of next week (Saturday), we’ll be collecting Youtubery in a separate page … 

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends rainy weather.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 15, 2020

Hodie est Id. Mai. 2772 AUC ~ 23 Mounichion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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We return to the City of Rome in 456 BCE and follow the ongoing domestic struggles that Rome faces in defining herself in terms of transparency at law.

In this second part of our CC Shorts interview with Dr Jody Cundy (University of Toronto), Jody tells the story of how she began studying Classics, and shares some of her favourite ancient and modern texts – including Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, and Marcel Detienne’s ‘Gardens of Adonis’.

It’s fair to say Stephen Fry is a man of many talents. After dazzling guests at a dinner party while retelling Greek myths, the British actor, comedian and author discovered his talent for bringing these ancient tales to life. He knows his Theseus from his Prometheus, his Medea from his Medusa, and has a knack for making us feel that the myths are still alive and kicking in the city’s old temples, winding streets and hills. He’s even written a book on the subject, suitably titled “Mythos”. Fry joins us from lockdown in his home in Norfolk, UK, to share his three favourite myths about Athens.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 14, 2020

Hodie est pr. Id. Mai. 2772 AUC ~ 22 Mounichion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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In this most recent installment of the A.D. History Podcast, Paul and Patrick discuss the dramatic destruction by Roman forces of Jerusalem’s Second Temple in 70AD, as well as the Siege of Masada Fortress in 73AD. The Romans also conversely play a part in epic construction, namely of the Flavian Amphitheater, better known today as the world famous Roman Colosseum completed in 80AD.

Perpetua of Carthage is almost unique in the literature of her time. She is a woman and a writer. Over the course of centuries, traditional Greco-Roman culture produced very few female writers. Nor did ancient literature bother much with the particular concerns of women. So Perpetua stands out as a witness to women’s experience in the third century—and the changed status of women in the Church. A Christian martyr, she kept a diary while in jail. The diary records ordinary details, such as visits from family members and the conditions of the prison. But it also tells of extraordinary visions. Perpetua speaks of pregnancy, birth, breastfeeding, and weaning. In prison she emerges as a charismatic leader of her fellow Christians. Her diary is an extraordinary record, and it is a beautiful meditation on Christian life.’

  • ‎Ancient History Fangirl: Thracians: Shoot the Messenger on Apple Podcasts
  • Who was Spartacus, really? It’s not an easy question to answer. The ancient sources agree that he was Thracian, but even this is up for debate. Still, we’re going to go out on a limb and say that to know Spartacus, you have to know the Thracians. The Thracians were a fierce warrior people, consummate mercenaries who fought in every major Greek and Roman war—and believed that they would never die. Join us as we try to breathe life into these epic people by exploring their unique mythology and religious beliefs.

    Book Reviews

    Professional Matters

    Alia

    ‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

    Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

    If it thunders today, it portends an eastern war and a major shortage.

    … adapted from the text and translation of:

    Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

    #Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 13, 2020

    Hodie est a.d. III Id. Mai. 2772 AUC ~ 21 Mounichion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

    In the News

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    Classicists and Classics in the News

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    Fresh Bloggery

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    Alia

    ‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

    Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

    If it thunders today, it portends a rise in river water and diseases for humans.

    … adapted from the text and translation of:

    Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)