Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 28, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Dec 2775 AUC ~ 5 Poseideion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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In Ode to an Odyssey, we see the aftermath of the sack of Troy through the eyes of a Greek king as author Vijay Hare takes us to meet a famed inhabitant of the smouldering city. This commended story was narrated by Katrina Kelly, CA Engagement Coordinator. EPIC: Modern Writers, Ancient Stories is a compilation of short stories written by entrants in the 2022 Classical Association Creative Writing Competition, inspired by Stephen Fry’s trilogy Mythos, Heroes and Troy.

George Tyrrell insisted that the quest for the historical Jesus was no more than scholars staring into a well to see their own reflections staring back. Jesus is the mirror image of those who study him. A similar phenomenon accompanies the quest for the historical Magi, those mysterious travelers who came from theEast, following a star to Bethlehem. In this work, ancient historian and scholar Eric Vanden Eykel helps readers better understand both the Magi and the ancient and modern interpreters who have tried to study them. He shows how, from a mere twelve verses in the Gospel of Matthew, a varied and vast literary and artistic tradition was born. The Magi examines the birth of the Magi story;its enrichments, embellishments, and expansions in apocryphal writing and early Christian preaching;its artistic expressions in catacombs, icons, and paintings and its modern legacy in novels, poetry, and music.

Alexander the Great is one of the most famous figures from history. Legends and fantastical versions of his life were told almost immediately upon his death, often merging fact with fiction. Through his interaction, both good and bad, with so many different empires and societies, Alexander the Great is viewed through many a lense; hero, villain, demi-god – the list goes on. Despite dying at a young age, his achievements have been immortalised throughout history, with the help of some extraordinary tales, Alexander the Great is intertwined with more cultures and religions than you would expect. In this episode, Tristan interviews Dr Peter Toth, the curator of the new British Library Exhibition on Alexander the Great. Together they discuss the idea of an Alexander Romance culture, and the layers of Alexander’s mythical past that have helped keep this giant of history alive.

Synopsis: Shalmaneser’s Syrian invasions were countered by a coalition forged by King Ahuni of Bit-Adini. But repeated campaigns wore down his rivals and ended in Assyrian dominance. “Ahuni, terrified by my terrible, awe-inspiring weapons and my grim warfare, crossed over the Euphrates to save his life, and made his way to other lands. At the command of my lord Assur, the great lord, I annexed Til-barsip, Aligu, Nappigi and Rugulit as royal cities. I settled Assyrians there and built palaces in them for my royal residence.  I renamed Til-barsip as Kar-Shalmaneser.” – Inscription of Shalmaneser III on the Kurkh Monolith

Rome has attracted aspiring conquerors and leaders for millennia, not just as a great metropolis, but as an idea. It has long been a symbol of military might and universal power, defined by political and religious authority as well as great feats of engineering that would leave indelible marks on the regions it conquered, and overshadow empire builders for centuries to come. Dan is joined by Simon Elliott, a historian, archaeologist and author of ‘The Legacy of Rome’, to discuss how the experience of being part of the Roman world is still felt in the modern day.

A conversation with author Yvonne Korshak about her novel ‘Pericles and Aspasia’ The novel unfolds against the background of the arts and history of the Golden Age seen through the eyes of two individuals who lent their luster to make it “golden,” Pericles, the great orator and visionary of democracy and its most influential woman, Aspasia. Their story takes them from the Agora—Athens’ marketplace—to the Acropolis, from the mercantile, raunchy Athenian Port Piraeus across the Aegean Sea to East Greece. Pericles and Aspasia—together and apart—navigate treacherous paths from venal calculations to impassioned philosophical inquiry, from high-stakes sea battles to the passions of family life.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends many of the upper class council members  being completely ruined because of their cowardice.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 26, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Dec 2775 AUC ~ 3 Poseideion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Welcome to The Classics Podcast Does…Ancient History A Level, designed for students, teachers and anyone interested in learning more about the ancient world! Episode 3 features Greek historians Dr Maria Fragoulaki and Professor Paul Cartledge examining the reasons why the Athenians lost the Peloponnesian War.

Welcome to The Classics Podcast Does…Ancient History A Level, designed for students, teachers and anyone interested in learning more about the ancient world! Episode 3 features Greek historians Dr Maria Fragoulaki and Professor Paul Cartledge examining the reasons why the Athenians lost the Peloponnesian War.

The playwright Menander of Athens (342/341 – 290 B.C.) was the most renowned comedic author of antiquity, surpassing even Aristophanes in popularity. As the father of the New Comedy, Menander moved away from biting satire to draw humor from the interactions of everyday people, popularizing the use of “stock characters” and romance plots that audiences could appreciate regardless of background or education. Of his 108 plays, only one has survived in complete form (The Dyskolos or “The Bad Tempered Man”), and in this episode we will delve into the history of New Comedy and Menander’s works in particular.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today it portends a civil ware and many deaths.

[Sunday] If it thunders today it portends the same.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 25, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Dec 2775 AUC ~ 2 Poseideion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Welcome to The Classics Podcast Does…Ancient History A Level, designed for students, teachers and anyone interested in learning more about the ancient world! Episode 2 features Professor Polly Low and Professor Neville Morley debating the manifold causes of the Peloponnesian War with James.

Welcome to The Classics Podcast Does…Ancient History A Level, designed for students, teachers and anyone interested in learning more about the ancient world! Episode 2 features Professor Polly Low and Professor Neville Morley debating the manifold causes of the Peloponnesian War.

In this episode of Accessible Art History: The Podcast, I’m exploring the magnificent Pantheon!

From a plague in Athens during the Peloponnesian War in 430 BCE, to another in 540 that wiped out half the population of the Roman empire, down through the Black Death in the Middle Ages and on through the 1918 flu epidemic (which killed between 50 and 100 million people) and this century’s deadly SARS outbreak, plagues have been a much more relentless fact of life than many realise. Brian Michael Jenkins is one of the leading authorities on U.S. national security and an advisor to governments, presidents and CEOs. Brain joins Dan to discuss the legacy of epidemics— which is not only one of the lives lost but also of devastated economies, social disorder, and severe political repercussions.

Bill sent Murray this question, ‘how long was the Macedonian Sarissa? I’ve read a lot about 20′ and sometimes longer’.

Liv speaks with the creator of QCODE’s Cupid podcast, Katy Cavanagh Jupe! They talk about all things Cupid, from its origins in Greek myth to the details of the show itself. Plus, just, loads of nerding out about Greek gods.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a dangerous war.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 24, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Dec 2775 AUC ~ 1 Poseideion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Welcome to The Classics Podcast Does…Ancient History A Level, a brand new series designed for students, teachers and anyone interested in learning more about the ancient world! Ancient History teacher and author James Renshaw chats to experts about some of the key events, themes, sources and debates in the OCR Ancient History A Level. Episode 1 with Dr Roel Konijnendijk and Professor Lynette Mitchell explores the reasons for the Greek victory over the Persians in 480–479 BCE.

Ancient History teacher and author James Renshaw chats to experts about some of the key events, themes, sources and debates in the OCR Ancient History A Level. We’re back for the second half of Episode 1 with Dr Roel Konijnendijk and Professor Lynette Mitchell to explore the reasons for the Greek victory over the Persians in 480–479 BCE.

Since the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings, the phenomenon of “Tutmania” has continued to capture the worlds imagination on an unprecedented scale. From innovative museum exhibitions that took the phrase ‘blockbuster’ to a new meaning, to SNL sketches and collectable memorabilia – there is no doubt that this once forgotten Pharaoh will now live on forever. But how did the Boy Pharaoh become a celebrity – and is his worldwide fame a force for good? In this episode Tristan is joined by Dr Campbell Price, the curator of Manchester’s Egypt and Sudan collection, to discuss the extraordinary legacy of Tutankhamun. Looking at his Cold War arrival in America, to feuding Museum Curators, and delving into the world of virtual autopsies – what is Tutankhamun’s legacy, and is it too late to change?

Unearthed from the ruins of ancient cities in modern-day Iraq, the reconstruction of the epic from fragments of clay tablets has been a labour of love for scholars of Ancient Mesopotamia. This painstaking work has brought to life a sophisticated story of adventure, heroism and friendship, as well as a reflection on the human condition. Today experts are uncovering additional fragments of cuneiform script, and using artificial intelligence to decipher the text and fill in the gaps of this and other stories. Professor Anmar Fadhil from the University of Baghdad tells the programme about the latest discoveries. Bridget Kendall is joined by Andrew George, Emeritus Professor of Babylonian at SOAS at the University of London and author of an acclaimed English translation of the epic; Professor Enrique Jiménez is chair of Ancient Near Eastern Literature at Ludwig-Maximiliens University in Munich, Germany. He’s published widely on Babylonian literature of the first millennium BC; and Dr Louise Pryke is Honorary Associate in the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Sydney in Australia. She’s the author of Gilgamesh, a guide to the epic which was published in 2019.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a guardian post foiling an enemy ruse for the state.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 23, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Dec 2775 AUC ~ 30 Maimakterion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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This week the Roman historian and archaeologist Jane Draycott takes us to meet one of history’s most glamorous and infamous couples, Antony and Cleopatra. We join them in a crucial year in the history of Ancient Rome, around 31/30 BCE, when the Roman republic fell away and Octavian – later Emperor Augustus – seized power and founded the Roman Empire, with disastrous consequences for Antony, Cleopatra and their children.This dramatic piece of history forms the origin story of Cleopatra Selene, Antony and Cleopatra’s only daughter and the subject of Jane’s fascinating new book, Cleopatra’s Daughter: Egyptian Princess, Roman Prisoner, African Queen. In this episode we explore the years leading up to the Battle of Actium as well as the battle itself and Antony and Cleopatra’s subsequent suicides. We unravel the truth behind some of the most famous stories about the couple, and explore the nature of female political power in the ancient world.

Along with Achilles, Hector, Helen and Cassandra, one of the most famous names associated with Troy is Heinrich Schilemann, German businessman and ‘discoverer’ of Troy.  In this entertaining story, Rebecca Lewis-Oakes reimagines how Schilemann’s discovery came about, with a little help from the gods…

Lucius has been turned into a donkey after using the wrong body lotion. Then, he was kidnapped by bandits. Things are about to get a whole lot worse for Lucius.

We’re back with more bonus mythological content based on QCODE’s new podcast CUPID! This time, the finale… What’s the deal with Greek myth, anyway? Listen to Cupid wherever you get your podcasts. Find more LTAMB episodes devoted to these characters and stories in this Spotify playlist, and even more playlists here.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a disease-carrying wind.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)