#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 2, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 28 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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In a special episode of the podcast, Dan and his team hit the road after receiving a call about the discovery of a hoard of rare Iron Age coins, at a secret location in the New Forest. At the St Barbe Museum in Lymington, Dan speaks to the detectorists who made the discovery of a lifetime and to Professor Emeritus Tony King about what these coins and their unusual imagery tell us about Britain’s Celtic ancestors and civilization before the Romans arrived.

The Goths were a Germanic tribe infamous for their brief sack of Rome in 410 AD but their cultural and political influence was felt throughout Europe for centuries. They re-shaped the Balkans, preserved the Roman way of life in Italy and presided over a cultural flourishing in Spain. But how, many centuries after their demise, did they come to give their name to an important architectural style in medieval Europe and, in the 20th century, to a subculture popular all over the world? Bridget Kendall talks all things Gothic with David Gwynn, historian at Royal Holloway, University of London, and author of Goths, the Lost Civilisation. Also on the panel are Janina Ramirez, a cultural historian, broadcaster and author who focuses on the Middle Ages, based at the University of Oxford, and Mischa Meier, professor of ancient history at the University of Tubingen in Germany.

Rhiannon Evans and Matt Smith take a fond look at the first season HBO’s Rome.

How did sex workers in ancient Greece and Rome manage their periods? What were the most popular fashions for pubic hair? What underwear was everyone wearing? And how did sex workers handle contraception and unwanted pregnancies? In this episode, we team up with Kate the Exploress to delve into the most intimate aspects of daily life for sex workers in ancient Greece and Rome, including the most powerful sex magic of all: the blood magic of periods.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of fish and fruit

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 1, 2021

Hodie est Kal. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 27 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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This week the guys hopscotch from Babylon, to Memphis (not TN), to Alexandria (not VA), and even to Venice (not FL) in search of an answer to one of the most captivating and lingering archaeological questions of all time—what happened to the tomb and body of Alexander Ille Magnus? How could this centuries-long tourist attraction (visited by some of the greatest Caesars who ever caesared) and massive, Wal-Mart sized complex simply vanish? As they say, it’s complicated. We’ve got cross-desert catafalquing, followed by temporary tomb subletting, and toxic mosque-ulinity, capped off by some embarrassing nose-mangling, and maybe even a mummy heading for its final stop in a gondola. Paging Heinrich Schliemann!

Ridley Scott, a prolific director and producer, is responsible for some of the most critically acclaimed films of all time. While “Alien” (1979) and “Blade Runner” (1982), are regarded as significantly influential sci-fi films, “Gladiator” (2000) and “Black Hawk Down” (2001), to name just a few, highlight his dedication to epic historical dramas.

Many moons ago, I had a thought. “Hey! It would be fun to do a bookend series covering the Hellenistic Age with Alexander and the Great and Cleopatra!” 21 episodes and small novel’s worth of notes later, we have reached the conclusion of the series. After the Battle of Actium, Cleopatra and Antony continue to fight but are running out of options. As Octavian closes in on Alexandria, the situation turns desperate. Ultimately, the ramifications of the events in this episode mark a turning point in Western Civilization. Tune in for the conclusion of Cleopatra’s epic tale!!!!

Do you dare set foot in the Emperor Augustus’ childhood nursery? They say anyone who does is seized by shuddering and terror… This story has been inspired by Suetonius, Augustus, 6 & 94, and is followed by a discussion of the Emperor Augustus, his life and achievements, and ancient poltergeists.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a year of good health and concord.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 30, 2021

Hodie est pr. Kal. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 26 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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It’s time to welcome LJ Trafford back onto the podcast and talk about her new book, Sex and Sexuality in Ancient Rome. We discuss a number of topics, from homosexuality through to what the sexual expectations were of the time. What did the Romans view as acceptable to get up to and what was considered shameful? Obviously the content here is adult so please bear that it mind.

How might the field of Classics address the unique concerns and questions posed by its students from diverse backgrounds? One valuable way to answer this question is to privilege approaches to the ancient world traditionally eclipsed by literary studies: that is, studying the legacy of ancient works, ideas and associations in other contexts, especially via the study of material culture and classical reception. A complementary approach to the above question is to turn to the classical literary canon itself and consider the potential limits of the texts that are traditionally offered to students as the best of what the ancient world has to offer. It is often by moving outside of these boundaries that students can encounter voices that corroborate their own findings in ancient texts: voices that reject many of the traditional hierarchies still upheld in Classics today and that suggest a classical antiquity already pushing back against its self-valorisation. In this episode, Shivaike Shah speaks to Dr Kathleen Cruz from the University of California at Davis about these very issues.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends god-like conditions for mortals to live in; of course, evils will come eventually.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 29, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 25 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Was Homer was influenced by the stories of civilizations to the east of Greece? Joining us to discuss the Hittites and their potential (direct and indirect) influences on the Greek epic tradition is Mary Bachvarova, professor of classics at Willamette University and author of From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Ancient Greek Epic

Over the past half a century no one has done more to forward the field of ancient Spartan research than Professor Paul Cartledge. His gravitas and authority on the topic are second to none and his eloquence in describing these ancient warriors is more akin to poetry than prose. His presence on the Spartan History Podcast is most fitting, in that without his extensive body of work, the show would in all likelihood not exist. This is the final episode on the topic of archaic, or more specifically Lycurgan, Sparta . Having previously described the different facets of Spartan societal, political and religious reforms I invited the Professor on to bring’s his considerable knowledge to bear in a succinct summary of the time frame. The conversation at certain points got extremely academic and specific in it’s approach to the task of summary, just the way I like it. It added immense value to my understanding of this confusing era and I trust it adds value to your own.

…In this episode we return to Northumberland to speak to Dr Andrew Birley and Marta Alberti who, alongside their team of archaeologists and volunteers, are constantly discovering more about the people who lived and passed through the site. They describe their findings from 2021, including more information about the other animals at Vindolanda and the post-Roman uses of the fortifications. We also get a glimpse of what we can expect from next year’s work.

This week Patrick and a panel of biographers, historians and classicists discuss the life and legacy of Roman General Scipio Africanus. Joining Patrick on the show are: Author and Historian Adrian Goldsworthy, Dr Catherine Steel, Professor of Classics, University of Glasgow, Dr David Levene, Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, New York University, Professor Federico Santangelo, Professor of Ancient History, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University and Dr John Serrati, Department of Classics and Religious Studies, University of Ottawa.

Thanks to his role in the Maccabean Revolt, Antiochus IV Epiphanes of the Seleucid Empire played an important part in the history of Judaism. From the prophecies of Daniel to the histories of Josephus, Dr. Joseph Scales joins the show to talk about the perception of Antiochus IV in the Jewish literary tradition, viewed as both an incompetent ruler and great persecutor, and the prototype of the Antichrist.

Nero has some freedmen executed but the stories are murky. The Parthians decide to try their luck taking back Armenia while Corbulo tries to keep the peace.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends good things for the lower classes, but the anticipated fruit harvest will be destroyed.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for November 27, 2021

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 23 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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It’s been a while, but here’s finally a new episode of the Ancient World Magazine podcast. In this episode, Dr Joshua Hall talks with Dr Ulla Rajala (Stockholm University) about Early Rome, with special reference to a number of books that have recently been published on this topic.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends the same thing (presumably as yesterday)

[Sunday] If it thunders today, it portends the ruin of many wealthy council members due to their cowardice/

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)