#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 5, 2020

Hodie est Non. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 20 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an outbreak of mangy diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 4, 2020

Hodie est pr. Non. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 19 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Our guests this episode were Marguerite Johnson and Malcolm Choat.

Odysseus  reflects on his deadly rivalry with Palamedes, one of the Warlord Agamemnon’s most skilful generals on the fields of Troy.

Jasper tells us about last stands in the ancient world.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a heavy winter but subsequent abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 3, 2020

Hodie est a.d. III Non. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 18 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In this episode we speak with Bram Fauconnier on ‘Education’.

‘I’m Spartacus!’ In the field of epic film making, the 1960 historical drama ‘Spartacus’, is legendary. Directed by Stanley Kubrick, adapted from the Howard Fast novel by Red Scare blacklisted screenwriter, Dalton Trumbo, and starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Peter Ustinov and Jean Simmons; it is a classic. But how much of the plot has emerged from the true story of a Thracian gladiator and slave who escaped his Roman captors and led an unsuccessful but impressive rebellion against their oppressors? How much of the film’s message was formed by the personalities involved in its creation, and the context in which it was made. In her own words, Dr Fiona Radford devoted years of her life to the man with the most memorable chin cleft in the world – Kirk Douglas, specifically as Spartacus. Her thesis traced the production history of this film, examining in particular the effect that the turbulent process had on the portrayal of female characters. Having taught at Macquarie University, ANU and the University of Sydney, she currently teaches history at secondary school level, and her conversation with Tristan in this episode is an eye-opener to 1950s film making as well as the legend of Spartacus.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an overconsumption of flocks due to a shortage of fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 2, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 17 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In this episode, Sanchita Balachandran joins us to speak about the sensory experience of ancient potters and painters, her experimental archaeology project at Johns Hopkins, and the underdrawings on Greek painted pottery.

Jonathan Eaton joins us for a lively discussion about life in the Roman Army, based on his new book.

This week Jeff and Dave tag along with Cicero to sunny Tuscany where they find Cato Uticensis knee-deep in a pile of books on Stoicism. Gorging on books (helluari libris) and literary addiction (aviditas legendi) is our theme as we share favorite authors and works from the ancient and modern worlds.  First up is a primo piatto of Plato, followed by savory servings of Sophocles, and Apuleian “afters.”  If you still have room for more, stroll out with Jeff and Kazantzakis for a nightcap on Crete, and join Dave as he doles out cigars and Scotch to C.S. Lewis and Thomas Sowell.  Which books have you feasted on recently?

Edith Hall explores Plato’s legend of Atlantis and considers why the tale continues to endure 2,500 years on Classicist Edith Hall, an expert on ancient Greek literature, explores Plato’s lost city of Atlantis. She considers our enduring fascination with the tale 2,500 years on and asks whether there ever was, in fact, a real Atlantis.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of fish and fruit.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 1, 2020

Hodie est Kal. Dec. 2772 AUC ~ 16 Maimakterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Aaron de Souza is an archaeologist specializing in the material culture of Egypt and Nubia. He earned his PhD at Macquarie University, Sydney, in 2016, and is now a Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, in Vienna. In the field, Aaron works with ceramics and material culture, particularly in cemetery contexts. He has published several articles and a book, titled New Horizons: The Pan-Grave Ceramic Tradition in Context. Aaron is an insightful researcher, part of the new generation of scholars that are examining (and re-examining) historical material in new ways.

Come dream with me as we go Deep into the 2nd Century BCE and discover the origins of Lucius Cornelius Sulla. Then Total War, as we experience the epic 2nd Battle of Cirta.

Join Peter in 5th century Athens, a crowded city in the midst of a siege, where a devastating disease had just erupted. Our guests discuss whether this really was plague, the breakdown in law and order that began to emerge, and how the historian Thucydides survived the disease that hit his city.

Welcome to the Eastern Roman Empire in the sixth century. This time, Peter discusses a plague that historians and medical experts agree was likely the first plague pandemic humanity experienced. You may not have heard much about the emperor Justinian I, or why he’s got a plague outbreak named after him, but by the end of this episode you’ll hear just how devastating and long-lasting this pandemic was.  

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a good year ahead.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)