Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 13, 2022

Hodie est Id. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 16 Metageitnion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends a plague on the bodies of both humans and animals.

[Sunday]  If it thunders today, it portends war for the people but an abundance of crops.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 12, 2022

Hodie est pr. Id. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 15 Metageitnion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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The Saxon Shore forts get their name from the Notitia Dignitatum and are among the most impressive Roman remains in Britain, but why they were built remains unclear.

In antiquity, Gandhara was one of the most deeply-rooted hubs of Buddhism, and scholars have attempted to search for any possible encounters between Buddhists and the Greeks who settled in Central Asia and India. Fascinating pieces of evidence hint at these connections: the Pali text known as the Milindapañha (“The Questions of King Milinda”) portrays the Indo-Greek king Menander I Soter as a Buddhist convert and saint swayed by the wisdom of the Sage Nagasena, while Emperor Ashoka dispatched missionaries to the Hellenistic kingdoms and ordered his beliefs to be inscribed in Greek on the rocks outside of Kandahar. Centuries later, the sculptors of Gandhara would adapt Greco-Roman mythology and designs to create beautiful works of art, resulting in the first known depictions of the Buddha in human form, and transforming the demigod Heracles into Heracles-Vajrapani, protector of the Buddha.

Nero was a lover, not a fighter. Not a great leader of armies. He thought of himself as an artist. He wanted to be on stage, not on horseback. He was very proud that he closed his Janus.

Liv speaks with author Cait Corrain about retelling and adapting Greek myths, both in space and on earth. Follow Cait for updates on Crown of Starlight, Dionysus and Ariadne in space, follow on Twitter and Instagram.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of cattle fodder and acorns, but it will go bad during the ripening season.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 11, 2022

Hodie est a.d. III Id. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 14 Metageitnion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Commemorating the 6th anniversary of the death of Mark’s father, and the 75th anniversary of Indian independence, this episode connects widows and partition, and while also touching on the legacy of Alexander the Great, the origins of badminton and tennis, and obscure typesetting vocabulary.

“If Croesus goes to war he will destroy a great empire.” That was the prophecy the Oracle of Delphi delivered to the Lydian King – she just left out that fact it was his own empire that would be destroyed. Known as the Pythia, the Oracle of Delphi was the High Priestess of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi. Responsible for delivering divine prophecy to those that visited her – she was one of the most revered women in antiquity. In this episode, Tristan is joined by classicist and author Dr Garrett Ryan to talk all things prophecy. With fainting sheep, and godly intervention, was the Oracle really high on fumes – or is that a modern misconception?

For the eighth time, listeners provide questions and Rhiannon and Matt answer! In this episode: – Was Antony rehabilitated? – Did Classical Latin have regional dialects? – How did Romans celebrate their birthday? – Who was the first true Roman emperor? – How much of the Roman Empire remains in the modern world? – What were some of the Roman’s most notable superstitions? – Did a Roman soldier get time off? – When did it become customary for Romans to learn Greek? – Did Rome have a foodie culture? Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University)

Rome has just experienced a scandal like no other. A terrible famine had hit in the years 440-439 BCE, and this had caused political chaos. The patrician appointed to secure grain, Lucius Minucius, had not experienced much success. Into the void stepped a wealthy equestrian named Spurius Maelius….

Most accounts of Caesar’s life start later on–such as during his time in Gaul or crossing the Rubicon. But his early life was just as fascinating; maybe even more so. This is the Caesar who stood up to Sulla and refused to divorce his wife. The Caesar who made an early career of prosecuting corrupt governors to cement his cred as a populist–even as it made him powerful enemies. The Caesar who, when kidnapped by pirates, demanded they raise his ransom and spent his time in captivity hanging out on the beach and reading them bad poetry. It’s a fun, lighthearted introduction to Caesar’s life before it takes its dark turn. We hope you enjoy.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a good harvest, but bad things for reptiles and harm to humans.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 10, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IV Id. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 13 Metageitnion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Vorenus goes in search of his enslaved children, Timon has a change of heart and character, Octavian levels up, and Atia and Servilia escalate their feud. We are also joined by special guest Todd Ellis Kessler, writer of the episode.

New data that show the chicken was domesticated vastly later than previously thought have shattered the poultry paradigm. Moreover, chickens were elite pets for centuries before someone decided to toss them in a pot. The myths of the archaic bird die hard in this fast moving and delicious episode.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends pain, suffering, and wretchedness for the majority of people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 9, 2022

Hodie est a.d V Id. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 12 Metageitnion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Known as the Eternal City, ancient Rome was one of the greatest civilisations in human history, but how did it come about? With a turbulent history of Kings, civil wars and imperial desires – Rome has an incredible history. But who founded it? Were Romulus and Remus real brothers fighting for their kingdoms, or did a Trojan hero found one of the mightiest Italian states? Recent archaeological discoveries indicate a far more complicated picture of Rome’s beginnings – but where does its mystic past fall into this new story? In this episode, Tristan is joined by Professor Guy Bradley from Cardiff University to discover more about the origins of Rome around the 8th century B.C.

This file contains the first three episodes in our series on Marc Antony and Cleopatra: Lovers in a Dangerous Time, all in one place. This series has everything: love, war, violence, betrayal, Marc Antony barfing everywhere, and Cleopatra being extremely glamorous at all times. If you’ve listened to our interview with Barry Strauss on the Battle of Actium, you may be in the mood to dive into this story–or revisit it.

Euripides is really here making us all fall for Menelaus and I don’t know how to deal with it. Menelaus and Helen are reunited and plan their escape from Egypt.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a year of good health for people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)