#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 6, 2021

Hodie est pr. Non. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 22 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the same as yesterday and even better.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 5, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Non. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 21 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Our guests this episode were Diane Rayor, Jane Montgomery Griffiths, Marguerite Johnson, Tracey Walters, Sandra Boehringer and translator Annie McCarthy. You can learn more about our guests and where to find them on our website.

We’re Spartacus! This week Spartacus (aka Colin) and Spartacus (aka Eli) take on the classic epic written by Dalton Trumbo, directed by Stanley Kubrick and starring Kirk Douglas. This movie stands out among its peers to us in that it’s really about something. Is this a case of a movie telling a sort of collectivist narrative? Is Spartacus the hero of the left? We get into the details of both this film’s relation to the historical Spartacus, the Red Scare in Hollywood and the creative minds which led to its production. Do we want Large Spartacus of Small Spartacus? Crassus is the reason we need to federalize it.

If cavalry attacked a Macedonian phalanx how did it react? Did the phalanx have a tactic to hold them off? Murray explains..

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a sunny spring and a fruitful summer.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 4, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 20 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Throughout the three centuries of Ptolemaic control over Egypt, their dynasty can be best described as having a split identity. Ruling from Alexandria, the new intellectual and cultural capital of the Greek-speaking world, the Ptolemies were very much Hellenistic kings and queens. But Egypt was an ancient land, and they needed to come to terms with the pharaonic tradition that had dominated Egyptian life for the better part of 3,000 years. As the longest reigning dynasty in Egyptian history, the Ptolemies adopted the role and iconography of the pharaoh to great success. They were also capable of developing new ways to project their power, whether through the establishment and promotion of royal cults and new deities like Serapis, or incorporating the image of splendor and abundance as part of their propaganda. In this episode, we will see how the Ptolemies successfully legitimized their rule in the eyes of both Greeks and Egyptians alike.

In this final episode of the first series, I break down the epic poem into its main chunks and tell you about all the bits in the Odyssey you might not know about because despite being awesome they get cut out of pretty much every adaptation. And I almost manage to do it in ten minutes!

Cleopatra looms large in the imagination, but her legacy is often overshadowed by the western cultural tradition. It turns out that there are many ways to understand the last Pharaoh of Egypt. Special Episode – The Reception of Cleopatra with Yentl Love We were thrilled to sit down with Yentl Love to discuss the Islamic reception of Cleopatra. Love is known for her work in making ancient history and classics accessible through her blog the The Queer Classicist. Love has been studying Ancient History and Classics for a number of years and is now bringing the ancient world to life for readers across the globe…

What does Taylor Swift have to do with Ancient Greek Music? What role did it play in the ancient world? And if we listened to it properly,  would we actually like it???It’s time to discover the fascinating world of ancient music…

Popular discussions of human history are punctuated with conflict, but when did warfare begin? To discuss this massive question, Professor Nam Kim has returned to the Ancients. Taking in examples from Ancient Germany, Britain, Kenya and Vietnam, Nam uses Anthropological Archaeology to decipher whether Ancient societies were involved in warfare before the birth of nation states, and to explore the question of why humans have been prone to violence between groups.

By the end of the 300s, the soldiers on Hadrian’s Wall were hungry, they were under-equipped, and they hadn’t been paid in years. Even so, many stayed at their posts–even as the Roman Empire lost its grip on Britain entirely. Find out how the fall of Rome looked from the view of Hadrian’s Wall–and what became of those stationed there, holding the frontiers of an empire as it swiftly crumbled around them.

Common to many cultures across the world, swimming appears on the surface to be a benign leisure activity. But in fact it has much to tell us about such things as the development of societies, our bodies and minds, and our relationship to our ancestors and the natural world. For the Ancient Greeks and Romans, swimming was essential for instilling discipline, as a necessary skill for warriors, and to promote wellbeing. In West Africa where water had spiritual significance,..

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

if it thunders today, it portends boundless prosperity [this is today’s; yesterday’s should have portended famine followed by discord]

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 3, 2021

Hodie est a.d. V Non. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 19 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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This week Dave and Jeff find themselves trapped with Odysseus and his men in the cave of the dreaded chatterbox Cyclops. Here they’re confronted not only with the question “How do we get out of here?”, but also “Is the Cyclops really that bad of a guy?”, “How do the Greeks define civilization?”, “What’s the true hierarchy in the Vomitorium?”, and even, “Can you base a whole society on cheese?” Brace yourself for non-stop, root-crackling, sheep-strapping, lamb-cramming, epic-simileing, cheese-filching action, and, as always, best to save your hubristic braggadocio for well after your ship has cleared the harbor.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends boundless prosperity.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 2, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Non. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 18 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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The fourth and final episode in our series on Troy: Fall of a City, discussing episodes seven and eight. Thank god. We repeated a number of things we’ve been saying all the way along in our final notes in this last episode about Fall of a City, but we hopefully have managed to do so in a clear and synthesized way. Thanks for coming on this four-episode journey with us, and we’ll be back in two weeks with, at last, some new material!

In the Garden of the Hesperides, Hermes gathers apples for the next leg of the journey while Perseus collects stories from the Titan Atlas, who holds up the sky.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an end to threatening events.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)