#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 29, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 12 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Paul explains the thinking behind traditional displays. He then guides us through the new displays at the Ashmolean. What is he doing differently? What does the future of display look like?…

Join this discussion with Helen McVeigh (Coordinator of the Belfast Summer School in Greek and Latin), to listen in on an oft overlooked but underrated aspect of Classics: Ancient Greek novels.

At its height the Kingdom of Aksum was considered one of the four great powers of the Ancient World. Situated primarily in what is now northern Ethiopia, Aksum’s legacy is astonishing and far reaching and so it is extraordinary to think that so few people have heard about this kingdom today. To explain why this is the case, and so much more, I was delighted to be joined by Dr Jacke Philips, an archaeologist and leading expert on the Kingdom of Aksum. In this podcast Jacke explained to me what we know about this ancient African kingdom and how we are continuing to learn more thanks to new, ground-breaking archaeological discoveries. From Aksum’s relations with neighbouring kingdoms to its important role in the history of both Christianity and Islam, Jacke explains all in this brilliant chat.

What tales kept people from thousands of years ago up at night? This Halloween, Ancient History Fangirl teams up with Liv Albert from Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! to delve into spooky stories from the ancient world that will send a shiver up your spine—tales of shrieking Banshees, deathly Furies, and the terrors of Samhain. So spread some salt over your threshold. Settle into your favorite chair. Pour yourself a drink to take the chill from your bones. And if there’s a knock on your door, whatever you do—don’t answer it.

A Roman Empress could often be one of the influential individuals in Rome. Always close to the seat of power, they have been recorded as dutiful, scheming, seductive and conniving – as interesting individuals as the Emperors themselves. Guests: Associate Professor Rhiannon Evans (Head of Department of Languages and Linguistics, La Trobe University)

Heus, you want to learn Latin? Salve sodalis, you have come to the right place. This is a Latin podcast for beginners. With the series “Litterae Latinae Simplices”, you will set up for a journey into Latin literature, in easy spoken Latin.

Our guests this episode were Marguerite Johnson, Jane Montgomery Griffiths, Sandra Boehringer (translation by Annie McCarthy) and Diane Rayor. 

Book Reviews

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See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a year of serious disease.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Sponsored Post Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – NovemberDeep Green Permaculture

It’s November, the last month of spring, the weather is moderate, deciduous trees are in leaf again, days are warm and there’s lots of green growth in the garden. The changeable and windy weather from October continues, but now there’s also the possibility of very sudden hot weather striking without warning so it’s important to protect plants from sun and wind. Also, regularly water newly planted trees and shrubs as the hot weather and strong winds can quickly dry out the soil.

Things to Do This Month:

  • Mulch around fruit trees and plants to retain moisture in the soil and prevent water loss from evaporation (keep mulch away from plant stems and trunks as this can cause stem rot/collar rot).
  • Mulch strawberries by placing straw underneath to keep the berries off the soil.
  • Propagate strawberries from runners.
  • Plant potted fruit trees and vines (having roots, can be planted anytime, best in spring & autumn).
  • Tie growing vines back to supports or wires.
  • Propagate plants by taking softwood (green) cuttings from now till January (after which they harden off).
  • Last chance to plant evergreen shrubs and trees (this includes citrus trees).
  • In ponds and water gardens, thin out existing aquatic plants, continue planting new ones, fertilise aquatic plants and feed fish regularly.

Vegetables and Herbs to Sow:

Sow in November Harvest (weeks)
Amaranth ds 7-8
Angelica ds 18 months
Asparagus d 2-3 years
Asparagus Pea d 8-11
Beetroot ds 7-10
Borage ds 8-10
Burdock d 17-18
Cape Gooseberry ds 14-16
Carrot d 12-18
Chicory d 16-24
Chinese cabbage ds 8-10
Chives ds 7-11
Climbing beans d 9-11
Coriander d 30-45
Cucumber d 8-10
Dwarf beans d 7-10
French tarragon d 30-40 days
Globe Artichokes s 42-57
Horseradish d 16-24
Jerusalem Artichokes d 15-20
Kohlrabi d 7-10
Lemon balm s 8-10
Lettuce ds 8-12
Mustard greens d 5-8
Okra ds 11-14
Oregano s 6-8
Parsley ds 9-19
Pumpkin ds 15-20
Radish d 5-7
Rhubarb d 12 months
Rocket d 21-35 days
Rosella s 21-25
Rosemary d 12 months
Sage d 18 months
Salsify d 14-21
Silverbeet ds 7-12
Summer savory d 6-10
Sunflower ds 10-11
Sweet corn ds 11-14
Turnip d 6-9
Yacon d 25

Key:
d = sow directly into ground
s = sow in seed tray
ds = sow directly into ground or seed tray
*= frost tender
**= sow after frost

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 28, 2020

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 11 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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This week Jeff and Dave take a close look at the Roman poet Ovid’s (43 B.C. – 18 A.D.) first public work, Amores I.1. We cover such important literary notions as recusatio, ἀδύνατον, and what it must be like to live in Des Moines, IA. Come for the literature, stay for the measured mayhem. Apollo at war, Mars playing rhythm guitar, Venus with sword and helmet, and Athena fanning loves flames. It’s a mixed up, muddled up, shook up world.

Join this episode with Peterhouse College Cambridge alumni Mr O’Neill to discuss all things Horace..

SAPIENS host Chip Colwell talks with experimental archaeologist Farrell Monaco about her work re-creating ancient Roman bread and what it means to reconnect with bakers of the past. Farrell also offers some tips for pandemic-era bakers who want to take their new hobby to the next level.

Our super spooky, terrifying Halloween episode that’s definitely not a lighthearted romp where a Greek god makes a podcast, trick-or-treats as Hercules, and emcees a poetry competition. Nope. Not at all.

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of necessities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Barry Baldwin: Horace and the ‘Last Assassin’

A guest post by my former professor from the University of Calgary ~ Barry Baldwin.

Apart from the usual suspects, chief character in Peter Stothard’s well-told tale, The Last Assassin: The Hunt for The Killers of Julius Caesar (2020) is Cassius of Parma, last of the Ides of March perpetrators to be cornered and killed in deference to Octavian’s implacable thirst for vengeance on those who had killed his adoptive father.

I am not going to repeat Stothard’s gripping narrative. One later, marginal matter intrigues me, if apparently nobody else: no discussion in the duumvirate of Fraenkel’s Horace or Syme’s The Roman Revolution, nor in the edition of Horace’s Epistles by A. S. Wilkins on which we were reared at school in the Classical Sixth.

In Epistles 1. 4. 3, addressed to the poet Tibullus, Horace wonders if his friend will scribere quod Cassi Parmensis opuscula vincat?

This diminutive is not as contemptuous as it might seem. Horace elsewhere (Epistles 1. 19. 35) applies it to his own poems. It suits Cassius of Parma, famous for his elegies and epigrams.

My question is: why would Horace adduce the man particularly hated by Octavian for the highly offensive and personal letter sent to him by Cassius (Suetonius, Augustus 4)?

Horace had, of course, fought at Philippi for the ‘Liberators’. Had the two met there or elsewhere and formed an ideological and literary friendship?

These Epistles seem to date to c. BC 24-20. Cassius was killed around 30 BC. How might Octavian (now Augustus in name, still Octavian in character) have reacted to this complimentary mention of the man he so detested? HIs multiple vengeances were complete in fact but surely not forgotten. Did Horace run a risk in reviving the name Cassius of Parma? Or was he relying on the ‘special relationship’ between himself and Augustus as depicted in Suetonius’ biography of him? It is worth subjoining that the fugitive young Horace had not been liquidated in the moppings-up of former ‘Freedom Fighters’.

I take the chance highly to recommend Stothard’s earlier books: On The Spartacus Road (2011); Alexandria: The Last Night of Cleopatra (2014); The Senecans: Four Men and Margaret Thatcher (2016)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 27, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 10 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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‘Classicist in Transition’, a podcast by GICS Ghent, hosted by Dimitri Van Limbergen and Alison John. In this episode we speak with Jeroen Wijnendaele on ‘Engagement’. GICS can be found on Facebook

Book Reviews

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See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends heavy rains.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 26, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 9 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an increase in animals, but there will be a shortage of water.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)