#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 28, 2020

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 11 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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This week Jeff and Dave take a close look at the Roman poet Ovid’s (43 B.C. – 18 A.D.) first public work, Amores I.1. We cover such important literary notions as recusatio, ἀδύνατον, and what it must be like to live in Des Moines, IA. Come for the literature, stay for the measured mayhem. Apollo at war, Mars playing rhythm guitar, Venus with sword and helmet, and Athena fanning loves flames. It’s a mixed up, muddled up, shook up world.

Join this episode with Peterhouse College Cambridge alumni Mr O’Neill to discuss all things Horace..

SAPIENS host Chip Colwell talks with experimental archaeologist Farrell Monaco about her work re-creating ancient Roman bread and what it means to reconnect with bakers of the past. Farrell also offers some tips for pandemic-era bakers who want to take their new hobby to the next level.

Our super spooky, terrifying Halloween episode that’s definitely not a lighthearted romp where a Greek god makes a podcast, trick-or-treats as Hercules, and emcees a poetry competition. Nope. Not at all.

Book Reviews

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See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of necessities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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Barry Baldwin: Horace and the ‘Last Assassin’

A guest post by my former professor from the University of Calgary ~ Barry Baldwin.

Apart from the usual suspects, chief character in Peter Stothard’s well-told tale, The Last Assassin: The Hunt for The Killers of Julius Caesar (2020) is Cassius of Parma, last of the Ides of March perpetrators to be cornered and killed in deference to Octavian’s implacable thirst for vengeance on those who had killed his adoptive father.

I am not going to repeat Stothard’s gripping narrative. One later, marginal matter intrigues me, if apparently nobody else: no discussion in the duumvirate of Fraenkel’s Horace or Syme’s The Roman Revolution, nor in the edition of Horace’s Epistles by A. S. Wilkins on which we were reared at school in the Classical Sixth.

In Epistles 1. 4. 3, addressed to the poet Tibullus, Horace wonders if his friend will scribere quod Cassi Parmensis opuscula vincat?

This diminutive is not as contemptuous as it might seem. Horace elsewhere (Epistles 1. 19. 35) applies it to his own poems. It suits Cassius of Parma, famous for his elegies and epigrams.

My question is: why would Horace adduce the man particularly hated by Octavian for the highly offensive and personal letter sent to him by Cassius (Suetonius, Augustus 4)?

Horace had, of course, fought at Philippi for the ‘Liberators’. Had the two met there or elsewhere and formed an ideological and literary friendship?

These Epistles seem to date to c. BC 24-20. Cassius was killed around 30 BC. How might Octavian (now Augustus in name, still Octavian in character) have reacted to this complimentary mention of the man he so detested? HIs multiple vengeances were complete in fact but surely not forgotten. Did Horace run a risk in reviving the name Cassius of Parma? Or was he relying on the ‘special relationship’ between himself and Augustus as depicted in Suetonius’ biography of him? It is worth subjoining that the fugitive young Horace had not been liquidated in the moppings-up of former ‘Freedom Fighters’.

I take the chance highly to recommend Stothard’s earlier books: On The Spartacus Road (2011); Alexandria: The Last Night of Cleopatra (2014); The Senecans: Four Men and Margaret Thatcher (2016)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 27, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 10 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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‘Classicist in Transition’, a podcast by GICS Ghent, hosted by Dimitri Van Limbergen and Alison John. In this episode we speak with Jeroen Wijnendaele on ‘Engagement’. GICS can be found on Facebook

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends heavy rains.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 26, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 9 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

See what’s happening this week in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an increase in animals, but there will be a shortage of water.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of October 24-25, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 8 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

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Synopsis:  In the 4th century AD, the Ethiopian kingdom of Axum converted to Christianity even as the neighboring Himyarites of Yemen converted to Judaism.  Centuries later, Axum’s invasion of Yemen to stop the persecution of Christians triggered a conflict with Persia. Map of the kingdoms […]

Bloodsports!!! It’s the match of last century! Maya Ball Players vs Gladiators! Join Dr. Karen Bellinger as she speaks with Andrew Kinkella and Cody Amens about what it took be an athlete in two different times and places, and whether or not one match would mean certain death. (recorded over zoom)

In October 42 BC the Roman Republic committed suicide. Near the town of Philippi in northern Greece the forces of Brutus and Cassius, the famous assassins of Julius Caesar and the last surviving cheerleaders of the Roman Republic, faced off against the armies of Marc Antony and young Octavian. Two separate battles were fought, the results of which decided the future direction of Rome. In this Ancients podcast, Tristan was joined by Steele Brand (@steele_brand) to talk through these all-important battles. From the background to Brutus’ pitiful demise Steele explains the final Roman attempts to restore the Republic and how they were ultimately squashed by a combination of political brilliance, suicidal blunders and outrageous luck. Steele is the author of ‘Killing for the Republic: Citizen Soldiers and the Roman Way of War’. Quick note: Lycia is a region in southwest Anatolia, on the Mediterranean coast.

Daughter of Rome’s most venerated war hero, favorite granddaughter of its first emperor, wife of one of its most shining stars, Agrippina the Elder was born to be famous, thrust into the spotlight, whether she wanted to bask in it or not. But she also made her own spotlight, always fighting for what she believes in – and against those who would do her family harm. Let’s explore the beginnings of Agrippina’s story and bask in the latter half of Livia’s. 

14 – 68 – Although we covered the life and reign of Augustus in previous episodes, we can now explore the reigns of emperors 2, 3, 4 and 5 as we find out more about the unpredictability of Rome deciding to go back to a monarchical constitution in order to regulate the powerful Roman Senate.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends serious misery as the result of misfortunes.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)