#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 27, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 15 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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‎Myth Dynamite: Episode Seven: Various Artists on Apple Podcasts

Warning: there’s some talk of rape in this episode (sadly it’s quite unavoidable in myth). This week Abi and Sarah nerd-gasm HARD (yes, it’s possible for us to get MORE nerdy) because we’re bringing it back to our main man, Ovid (Latin poet of the first-century BCE/CE) and his poem, published in around 8 CE: the Metamorphoses. NOT ONLY THAT, but we also get to talk about art and artists, so basically … we’re in heaven. Yes, this episode we’re talking about ‘Ovid’s Artists’, but my goodness there are a lot of them, so technically this episode we’re talking about ‘Three Of Ovid’s Artists With A Few Scattered Along The Way’. Catchy, right?

‎Smarty Pants: #168: The Many Faces of Aeneas on Apple Podcasts

The Aeneid has a reputation: it’s the founding myth of Rome, used down the centuries to justify conquest, colonization, and the expansion of empire the world over. Although Virgil includes many voices in his epic, Aeneas’s is the one that tends to be remembered—and celebrated, especially by his putative descendant, the Emperor Augustus. But with her new translation of The Aeneid, classicist Shadi Bartsch reveals the many ways that Virgil undermines both the glory of Aeneas and the authority of collective memory, down to the very verb used to begin and end the poem. Bartsch joins us on the podcast to untangle how the story of Aeneas is actually many stories, all in conversation with one another.

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Inscribing words, reading stories (online, March 10, 2021) – Current EpigraphyCurrent Epigraphy

Online Open House | Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memories in Classical Athens | The Kosmos Society

See what’s happening today in Dr Pistone’s Online Classics Social Calendar

SCS Calendar: Classics, Ancient History, and Classical Archaeology Webinars

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends unrest among the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 26, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Leptis Magna became a celebrated Roman city on the African shore and was the birthplace of the Emperor Septimius Severus. In this episode I chat with special guest Maria Lloyd all about how the city developed and grew. We then discuss Severus, how did he rise to power and what did he do? Politics, intrigue, betrayal and even whether it’s Leptis or Lepcis.

If a roman legionary camp was attacked, how fast could it react? Jasper gives us his opinion.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a heat wave, a shortage of water, and and outbreak of scabs on bodies.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 25, 2021

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 13 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Comparing the film 300: Rise of an Empire against the ancient Greek sources

The assumption had once been that they were nomads until the Romans came. But more recent archaeological work in modern day Jordan is dispelling this myth about the ancient Nabataeans. In this first episode in another two part podcast, Tristan was joined by Professor David Graf from the University of Miami to talk about the early history of the Nabataeans and their close links to the extraordinary ancient city of Petra. A leading expert on the history and archaeology of Petra and its people, David was excavating at the Rose City when Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade was being filmed at the ancient site 30 years ago. David, who has a particular fascination with the early history of the Nabataeans, explained how he has attempted to piece together information about the Nabataeans from various archaeological sources. From papyri fragments to inscriptions to ostraca to rare coinage. Part 2, focused around Petra’s later ancient history, will be released soon!

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life, meditations and reputation of this stoic and philosopher king, who Machiavelli called the last of the ‘Five Good Emperors’.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today it portends a reversal of fortune for those living in luxury; there will be wars and a major storm.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 24, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 12 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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This week we welcome our first in-studio guest (and it’s a big one)—Newberry Award winning young adult author (and Calvin University English Professor) Dr. Gary D. Schmidt. Tune in for a wide-ranging discussion about the influence of the Classics on Gary’s life and writing, including his love for Odysseus, his loathing of Achilles, and a sneak peek at his next novel, based on the labours of Heracles. Along the way watch out for those liminal spaces, whether they are middle school or entrances to the Underworld, and wait…is that the Piano Man himself, Billy Joel? Listen to the end to hear Dave and Jeff riff their way through some viewer mail.

This is where the story becomes really weird. Nero, up until now the golden child, suddenly becomes a cold murderer with the murder of Britannicus.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends good health for humans but destruction for fish and reptiles.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 23, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 11 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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OU PhD student Liz Webb talks to James Renshaw from the Godolphin and Latymer school about her research on ‘Thucydides and Audience Sensory Experience in the History of the Peloponnesian War.’ This interview was recorded for the Ancient World Breakfast Club podcast.

Is the age of empires over? And are they always a bad thing? Dominic Sandbrook and Tom Holland explore empires through history, examining the modern assumption that nation statehood is always the better way.

Why and how should we read Plato? Why did Plato write dialogues? Is Plato a friend to democracy? Dr. Marcus Gibson, John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Princeton University’s James Madison Program, joins Madison’s Notes to provide an introduction to Plato in preparation of a series of episodes on individual Platonic dialogues.

Like big brothers and sisters everywhere, Hermes and Athena enjoy scaring their little brother Perseus with tales of warriors and monsters. They also help prepare him for what he must do to save his mom. But to become a hero, he must face Medusa on his own.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends deformity for humans and destruction for birds.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)