#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 24, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 7 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Episode 22 (S4) With a backdrop of an original musical piece composed by Matthew Leigh Embleton, British composer, we hear the piece begin with a translation of the poem (read by Dr. Christensen of Brandeis University), it jumps to an excerpt of the Battle of the Frogs and the Mice by George Martin (read by Graeme Malcolm with permission of Random House Audio Books) with the conclusion of the poem (the attack of the crabs) told with storytelling brios by Dr. Christensen. Based on his book with Eric Robinson titled: The Homeric Battle of the Frogs and Mice we can hear the story teller across the millennia tell a tale of bravery and foolishness. George Martin and the Christensen / Robinson books are available on line. In a one on one interview with Dr. Joel Christensen he guides us through this odd epic poem where the heroes are frogs and mice acting like Homeric Heroes. Was this a poem written by Homer himself? Did kids or adults listen to it? What does Homeric poetry try to teach us? Did Alexander the Great hear this poem?

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a drought. There will be an abundant harvest from the nut trees in the autumn but they will be destroyed by storms.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 23, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 6 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In this episode, Dr. Dylan Rogers joins us to discuss his work on the sensory experience of water in ancient cities, monumental water displays, and the site of Nikopolis.

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a period of shortages during this winter.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 22, 2020

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 5 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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in which Leto gets chased by a Dragon, Her sister gets turned into an Island, Twins happen, We are introduced to the strategy of staying out of reach and shooting them with arrows and remark on the Hellenic ideas about Prophecy.

Come dream with me as we go Deep into the Second Century BCE and experience the dirty wars that are only spoken of with dread, Rome vs. Numantina, Rome vs. Numida. And witness the rise of Gaius Marius.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends prosperity but a heavy and wet winter.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 21, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 4 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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14th Official episode of Spartan History Podcast. Jason and the Golden Fleece Part 2.

The Emperor Constantine I, better known as Constantine the Great, is one of the most significant emperors in Roman history. His later Christian biographers lauded him as an icon, the man who set in motion Rome’s dramatic transformation into a primarily Christian empire. And yet Constantine’s own beliefs were deliberately ambiguous, as Professor David Potter explained. He learned from Diocletian, he witnessed the mistakes and the successes. He figured out how to heal divisions in the empire, but at the same time restore it to one man rule through blood and battle…

After completing the First Century A.D., Paul and Patrick reflect on all the subjects they wanted to cover – but ultimately did not make it to the final cut. Among the various events and figures in this episode, the Vietnamese Trung sisters, the great fire of Rome, the destruction of Pompeii, and more receive the spotlight!

Book Reviews

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends bad things and losses for the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of September 19-20, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 3 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Medusa fills the imagination with a very particular kind of fascination. Pity for her situation and dread of what she is capable of make her one of the most recognisable figures from Greek myth. She has transcended that context with her story reimagined by the Romans, the artists of the Renaissance, and she continues to excite wonder today. We sat down to talk about Medusa and her representation with the fabulous Liv, host of Let’s Talk about Myths Baby.

In this week’s episode of PillarTalk Will is away in Cyprus on an archaeological dig so in place of him we have this years social secretary and UoM student Flo! We discuss the controversial topic of displaying human remains in different settings and the ethical debate that occurs when we talk about how the remains of ancient people should be treated. Should museums display human remains at all? Is there a justification to display when it is educational? and how do modern humans perceive death and the body? Todays episode includes conversation about Egyptian Mummies, Scientific specimens and modern cultures where death is a crucial part of the community.

King  Ceyx set his ship upon the ocean despite his wife’s warning. Every day,  Queen Alkyone climbed the steps of the temple and begged the gods to  send her husband home to her…

Join in as we look at the culminating event of the decade!  The highlight of these past few episodes we have been hinting at!  It is going to be epic! It is the highlight of the century! I am lying!  But listen to the episode to find out why.

Treb Courie asks, was the iron shank of the pilum designed to be soft and bend easily?

The invasion of Brittania continues. When Plautius has them nearly finished, he sends for Claudius who turns up to take credit for the final blow. The Senate grant him tons of honours as a result of his victory. But he’s more interested in explaining to Romans how an eclipse works.

Persia launches its first invasion against Greece

The year 2020 represents the 2,500th anniversary of three battles which played a major part in shaping the future of the western Mediterranean world: the battles of Thermopylae, Artemisum, and Salamis.

The Emperor Constantine I, better known as Constantine the Great, is one of the most significant emperors in Roman history. His later Christian biographers lauded him as an icon, the man who set in motion Rome’s dramatic transformation into a primarily Christian empire. And yet Constantine’s own beliefs were deliberately ambiguous, as Professor David Potter explained. He learned from Diocletian, he witnessed the mistakes and the successes. He figured out how to heal divisions in the empire, but at the same time restore it to one man rule through blood and battle..

.Book Reviews

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the downfall of a famous man and war.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)