#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 8, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Id. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 4 Poseideon in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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In this sample episode from their forthcoming Close Readings series, starting next year, Emily Wilson talks to Thomas Jones about the comedies of Aristophanes, in particular Clouds and Lysistrata. Close Readings Plus: Among the Ancients is a new subscription podcast series looking at some of the greatest works of Ancient Greek and Roman literature over the course of a year, starting in January 2022 with the Iliad.

We can look at how people thought and how they acted, but Hannah Platts joins us to talk about what it felt like to be a Roman.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a virulent disease, out of which will come an abundance of crops but a plague on the flocks.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 7, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Id. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 3 Poseideon in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Romans had the reality of witches, those who made the brews and prepared the curses, but also the witches of fiction. In their poems and stories, a witch took on a horrific persona, one that skews much more closely to the modern idea of a witch. Guest: Associate Professor Rhiannon Evans (Head of Department of Languages and Linguistics, La Trobe University)

John J. Miller is joined by Barry Strauss of Cornell University to discuss Josephus’s ‘The Jewish War.’

John J. Miller is joined by Kyle Harper of the University of Oklahoma to discuss Petronius’s ‘The Satyricon.’

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the same thing for everyone [not sure if that refers to visions of the gods from yesterday or not]

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 6, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VIII Id. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 2 Poseideon in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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As we kick off Series 3, it’s now time to examine one of the most recognizable institutions that existed in Ancient Greece: The Delian League. To make sense of things, we’ll compare the Peloponnesian League and Sparta’s motivations there, against the Hellenic League that was formed to stand against Persia’s incursion. Then, against these two we will finally compare the Delian League, which emerges as a naval-centric league which formally kicks off the time when Athenian empire becomes possible.

Liv speaks with teacher, songwriter, and ancient instrument musician Bettina Joy De Guzman all about ancient instruments, music, and singing songs of Greek myths and stories. Find more about Bettina Joy’s work here: bettinajoydeguzman.com CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

Farrell Monaco at one of the two passes to the huge oven Down the River Tiber from Rome is the huge archaeological site of Ostia Antica, which used to be the main port for the city. It’s all ruins now, of course, and open to the elements, but still incredibly suggestive. As you stroll around under the umbrella pines, it’s hard not to daydream about what things might have been like a couple of thousand years ago. In my case, with very little formal education in the matter, those daydreams are pretty foggy. When I get to something I know a little about, like a bakery, the fog clears a bit and I can begin to see some details. With a real expert, however, things really come to life, so I was absolutely delighted to be able to visit the Mulino di Silvano at Ostia with Farrell Monaco, who has studied, and brought back to life, the canonical bread of Ancient Rome.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends men having visions of the faces of the gods and bad things will result.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 4, 2021

Hodie est pr. Non. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 30 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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… a quiet day …

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends a serious winter, but there will be abundance after

[Sunday] If it thunders today, it portends mangy diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for December 3, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Non. Dec. 2774 AUC ~ 29 Maimakterion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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What were the different types of ships used by the Romans navy? Did they only use triremes? Jasper tackles this question from from Douglas Gatto.

Greek and Roman writers would highlight the Thracians as some of the best mercenaries fielded in foreign armies from the mid-5th century and beyond. They would excel at hit and run tactics, harassing heavier troops and being able to defend difficult ground. This reputation would appear to be born out of their tradition of Homeric style warfare practiced in their own lands. Though we get no detailed accounts of how they fought against one another in their home territories. Our knowledge of the Thracians in war during the 6th and early 5th centuries comes to us thanks to account revolving around the Greek and Persian wars found in the Histories written by Herodotus. This would see their history during this period told through the context of various Persian campaigns through their lands, therefore lacking the details of how they fought, though we can get an idea from their reputation as warriors in later histories…

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the consumption of flocks because of a shortage of fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)