Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 26, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Oct. 2775 AUC ~ 1 Pyanepsion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Liber I, Carmina Quarta: Ovid finds himself and his ship at the mercy of the oceanic elements once again.

Second up for my Greco-Persian war series is the Battle of Marathon, fought in 490 BCE. The first time in living and recorded memory that a foreign invader attempted such a thing in Greece. Joining me to discuss the events is author and historian, Dr Owen Rees. Owen specialises in warfare in the ancient world and has a penchant for dissecting the psychological effects it had on the ancient psyche….

In our first ever episode, Malinda and Nicole discuss the myth of Demeter and Persephone. Featuring special guest SJ Brady.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the gods striking down a corrupt ruler.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 24, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Oct. 2775 AUC ~ 29 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Post longum tōtīus aestatis intervallum nuntiōs Latīnōs dēnuō ēdimus. Referenda autem nobis videntur pauca sed magnī momentī habenda, quae aestate ēvēnērunt….

The use of ancient DNA analysis looks set to revolutionise our understanding of the end of Roman Britain. In this episode, we are joined by Professor Duncan Sayer to discuss a major new ancient DNA project and what it can tell us about the origins and family networks of people in post-Roman Britain.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends drought. There will be an abundant harvest from nut trees but they will be destroyed in late autumn.

[Sunday] If it thunders today it portends the rise of a tyrant from civil unrest, but he will fall and the powerful will be utterly destroyed and inflicted with serious penalties.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 23, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Oct. 2775 AUC ~ 28 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Bruce emailed us this question, what do the columns (Trajan, Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius) tell us about the wars depicted? Are they reliable narratives? Narratives at all?

Liv is joined by Eva Rummery to talk all things plants in Greek myth and even some archaeology. Plant myths, sacred groves, and even how some plants were grown in the ancient world! Follow Eva on Twitter.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a  period of shortages during the winter.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 22, 2022

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Oct. 2775 AUC ~ 27 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Who knew that Thucydides had wise words to say about the duty to call out your friends when they’re out of order, or to support the Christian condemnation of public festivals?

Welcome to Accessible Art History: The Podcast! In this episode, I am discussing the amazing venue of the Circus Maximus!

Located on the banks of the River Nile in Luxor, Egypt, the Karnak Temple complex is one of the largest buildings ever constructed for religious purposes. Dedicated to the god Amun-Ra and covering over 200 acres – the Karnak Temple complex is bigger than some ancient cities. Earlier this year, Tristan visited the Temple complex, and spoke to the Director of Karnak Temples, El-Tayeb Gharieb Mahmoud. In this special, on location episode, Tristan and Tayeb give us a tour of one of the most colossal sites left from the ancient world. Journeying around the complex, looking at the reliefs, architecture, and reflecting on the Pharaohs responsible for it’s construction – what can we learn from this 4,000 year old building?

Carved from the very living bedrock of the Giza plateau, the Sphinx is shrouded in mystery. Archaeologists believe it’s about 4,500 years old. But there’s a fringe theory—the Sphinx Water Erosion Theory—that suggests it’s much, much older. Join us as we explore this wild theory that completely explodes the prevailing wisdom, and asserts that the Sphinx is in fact 10,000 years old—or maybe even more.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends prosperity but a difficult and wet winter.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 21, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Oct. 2775 AUC ~ 26 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Do you smell that? Could it be the warm smell of colitas rising up through the air? Or did Dave over-microwave his gas station burrito again? Well, whatever the odor is, this path paved with good intentions (and a little cement) is leading Aeneas and company to you know where. Our Trojan exiles have finally reached the stillettoed boot of Italy. But before they can plant a flag and put up their feet, Aeneas has to take a detour down into the Underworld for one last chat with dad. But how to get there? As the Cumaean Sybil says, the gettin’ in is the easy part, it’s the leaving that’ll give you fits. So, keep your eye out for lost comrades, watch those birds, and “bough down”, ut dicunt. Such a lovely place, such a lovely face.

The upcoming 100th anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb has us talking about the discoverer, Howard Carter, who seems to have had sticky fingers and a propensity to fudge the story of his find. Ethics? Morals? Does it matter? Look at all that nice stuff!

A brief history of The Ancient World. Plus: a new season, a new partnership and a new Patreon page!

Joined by a very special guest and the Rock’s personal Latin teacher, Dr. Kira Jones (@FlavianSophist), we enter the dreaming of Netflix’s The Sandman, based on Neil Gaiman’s iconic 1989-1996 comic of the same name. We dig the the mythological foundations of Gaiman’s, the nature of dreams and our favorite bits of Latin in modern pop culture. Come for the hot takes, leave never because you’re trapped in an eternal waking nightmare!

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends bad things and losses for the people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)