#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 24, 2021

Hodie est ad. VIII Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Carthage was a major power, and destination, in the first millennium BCE in the Mediterranean; and despite losing the Punic Wars, its history, and lore, never seems to fade. Dr Eve MacDonald, Cardiff University, joins the show to discuss the ancient civilization.

An incredibly popular goddess, characterised in statues of her by a vest of bee hives, or are they breasts … bull scrotums? In this episode Tristan speaks to Dr Carla Ionescu about the Ephesian Artemis, the great mother goddess. They discuss the arguments behind the different interpretations of the Artemis statues, her connections to other divine female figures, and her lasting impression on the ancient city of Ephesus.

Dr. Andrea Brock speaks about her environmental archaeological work on the Tiber River during the early foundations of ancient Rome.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 23, 2021

Hodie est ad. IX Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 13 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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A mother in Central America is worried that her son is being a little too risky when he walks home from the beach in women’s clothing. When she confronts him about this, he calls her a transphobic, homophobic boomer. Teens! Am I right? A woman is afraid that her boyfriend will cheat on her. And yet, she fantasizes that her boyfriend is cheating on her. How can she preserve her self-esteem while indulging her cuckqueen instincts? On the Magnum, it turns out the ancient Greeks were wrong about cunnilingus! Dan interviews Mark Haskell Smith author of “Rude Talk in Athens” which explores how comedians in ancient Athens brawled with each other. One of the worst insults was to accuse another of going down on a lady. Silly ancient Greeks.

Diocletian’s reign as Roman Emperor had many voluminous points: his antipathy towards Christianity, the creation of the Tetrarchy, and a rare imperial retirement. Dr Roger Rees, School of Classics, University of St Andrews, joins the show to discuss Diocletian’s life.

This week Dave and Jeff take a close look at a well-known passage from ch. 14 of the Lukan history of the early church. As the apostles extend their preaching ministry into the Lycaonian region of Anatolia, they are mistaken for the gods Zeus and Hermes because of a miraculous healing Paul performs. The priest of Zeus wants to gin up a sacrifice, but the apostles risk life and limb, barely averting the ceremony. This story bears some interesting resemblance to a famous account in Ovid’s Metamorphoses VIII of the old woman Baucis and her husband Philemon (and throw in the Christmas goose). Tune in for wide-ranging literary analysis of ξενία and more, possibly the worst pun Jeff has ever dropped, and a major programming announcement at the end.

It’s time for another episode of The Ozymandias Project with Lexie Henning! Tuck in your togas and hop aboard Trireme Transit for an exciting odyssey as we explore why Classics and Egyptology need each other, how breaking down boundaries between sciences and humanities could could lead to science funding for ancient fields, and why a numismatist should be the protagonist of a film.

While the pandemic keeps us apart, colleagues are working hard to find ways to organise virtual conferences. The 67th RAI is hosted by Turin this July. Elena Devecchi and Stefano de Martino explain what to expect this year, and what it means to Turin to host a RAI now. Walther Sallaberger explains the IAA’s role in coordinating the RAIs.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends good times, a setting aside of disputes, and an end to disease.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 22, 2021

Hodie est ad. X Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 12 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Why are white nationalists and the far right so fond of Ancient Greece and Rome? Katherine Harloe, Professor of Classics and Intellectual History at the University of Reading, looks at the ways in which the classical world is both used to lend respectability to the politics of hate, and distorted to give the false impression that it was an all-white space. But this is not just a modern problem – from British colonial India to fascist Italy, Katherine delves into the last 300 years of history to explain how the ancient world and white supremacy became entwined, and asks what classicists today can do about it.

This episode covers book 9 of Plato’s Republic. In this episode, Socrates is going to finally answer the question that started it all. Back in book 2, Glaucon and Adeimantus challenged Socrates to prove to them that it’s worthwhile to be just. To them, the life of injustice looks pretty good, if you can get away with it. Money, sex, power, what’s not to like? Socrates has been building up his answer since episode 4 of this series. He’s built an imaginary city, and education system and a group of superhuman philosopher kings to rule it all. In this episode, he’s going to finally explain what’s wrong with injustice. While the tyrant’s life may look fun from the outside, Socrates says it’s not so great when you get behind the music. According to him, the tyrant’s life is desperate, paranoid, and miserable. Not only is the philosopher king happier than the tyrant, he’s 729 times happier!

The novel, and in particular the romance genre, is at the heart of a billion dollar industry, but when did they originate? In this episode, Professor Tim Whitmarsh from the University of Cambridge takes us back to some of the world’s earliest fictional narratives, the novels of Ancient Greece. Tim and Tristan explore the themes of this literature, the elements of it which are echoed in modern novels, its possible links with Persian, Jewish and Indian literature, and the stories of cultural hybridization found in the texts. Tim is the author of Dirty Love: The Genealogy of the Ancient Greek Novel.

With Father’s Day just past, Brandeis University classical scholar Joel Christensen joins us once again to offer some reflections on what ancient Greek epics offer us on the topic of Fathers and Sons.

Water, water, everywhere…but how much of it can we drink?  In this episode, Chelsea and Melissa chat with Dr. Mark Locicero about Roman drainage systems in the ancient North African town of Volubilis (modern Morocco) and Ostia in Italy. Find out how ancient Mediterranean people controlled and accessed clean drinking water and how that differed based on status, class, and location. We explore issues that are still very relevant to our lives today, including global water shortages, waste, and inequality.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends especially damaging hot weather

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 21, 2021

Hodie est ad. XI Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 11 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In a conversation recorded as part of our virtual lecture series, Olivette Otele discusses her book African Europeans: An Untold History, which charts the long history of Africans in Europe and explores the role that African individuals – from enslaved people to Roman emperors and medieval saints – have played in European history.

Stretching out from the north west of France, Brittany has long been as identifiable with the Atlantic Ocean as with its continental neighbours in Europe. Whilst Sir Barry Cunliffe’s research and archaeological interests have taken him far and wide over the last six decades, this close neighbour of Britain continues to fascinate him. In this first of two episodes, Sir Barry takes us through the pre-Roman history of Brittany, stretching from the Mesolithic Period to the Iron Age and connections with Ancient Greece. From standing stones to voyages, bronze and lead axes to beakers, Barry explains how Brittany maintained its own identity, and the importance of its relationship with the ocean. His most recent book, Bretons and Britons: The Fight for Identity, is out now with Oxford University Press.

Heliodorus of Emesa (3rd/4th century CE) wrote the longest novel to have survived from antiquity, an adventurous romance that reemerged into Europe in the 1500s.

There was an approximate 23-year interregnum between the first and second Punic Wars. Dr Kathryn Lomas, Department of Classics and Ancient History, Durham University, joins the show to explain what occurred with Carthage during this period.

People in the past looked up at the stars and planets, too. How did ancient cultures perceive the night sky? How did they explain the movement of celestial bodies? How did astronomy figure into ancient religion, calendars, city planning, and more? Was it aliens? Nope, but it was pretty much all math. Sorry.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of wine but an increase in other crops and plenty of fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 19, 2021

Hodie est ad. XIV Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 8 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

A reminder that #Thelxinoe will not appear tomorrow (don’t worry, the Brontoscopic calendar is covered below!)

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We return to the world of Percy Jackson for book two, and immediate get mired deep in academic theory. Because of course we do. Featuring a critique of diet culture, Frantz Fanon, and a little bit of hubris.

In this episode, Katie & Cairo discuss ancient Greek comedy & satire as a genre and its resonances in comedy throughout history, and how it is reflected in writers across time, from Mel Brooks to William Shakespeare.

The Sasanian Empire existed in the 3rd-7th centuries, and for a period of time, held hegemony in various parts of the eastern Mediterranean Basin. Dr. Michael Decker, United Arab Emirates University, joins the show again to share what’s known about the Sasanian Empire’s hegemony in the Basin.

Gigantomachy II: Electric Boogaloo! Our longest episode to date, we really don’t lack for things to talk about. There’s a a lot to love in this show and some to look critically at but we really only have one question: who are those people in the bed with Apollo? We get into a lot, such as Zeus as a father, whether the Fates’ baby on the table makes any sense, how Heron should dress and which was our favorite giant. Plus, a loooong discussion about sexy lamps and winged phalloi! Stay till the end for the gag reel. Enjoy!

Why did the Roman economy nearly collapse during the crisis of the third century? To answer that question we are joined by a special guest contributor. We also examine the highly revealing case study of how Roman Gaul experienced it’s third century crisis on the ground. Specifically how it contributed to the creation of the short-lived Gallic Empire splinter state, founded by Postumus in 260AD.

We start with Aeneas escaping from a burning Troy. The gods tell him that it is his job to find the area where Rome will later be founded. Aeneas has many adventures, including visiting the underworld. He stops off in Africa where he meets Dido, the beautiful Queen of Carthage. They fall in love. Dido wants Aeneas to stay. However, the god Jupiter, reminds Aeneas that he needs to find the place where Rome will founded. Aeneas leave. Dido is furious. She curses Aeneas and his descendants and then kills herself. Later the Romans believe that the wars between Rome and Carthage are because of the curse that Dido made…

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends the death of pest to crops [

Sunday]  If it thunders today, it portends discord for the community..

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)