Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 26, 2023

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Feb. 2776 AUC ~ 5 Gamelion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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One of the most famous cities in history – Babylon is shrouded in mystery and myth. Located in ancient Mesopotamia, now modern Iraq, it was one of the epicentres of ancient culture, architecture, and the home of famous figures such as Hammurabi. But what do we actually know about Babylon – and what can we learn from ancient sources and modern archaeology? In this episode, Tristan is joined by Oxford scholar Stephanie Dalley who helps us separate fact from fiction. Looking at famous sites such as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, and the Ziggurat of Ur – what can we learn about Babylon, and what legacy has it left behind?

This episode originally appeared on our Patreon! We’re releasing it on our main feed because we also include Atargatis in Women of Myth. We hope you enjoy! The Spartacus of the First Servile War–a man named Eunus–was a worshipper of Atargatis, an ancient goddess of the sea often depicted as a mermaid. Atargatis was one of the most important goddesses of ancient Syria–with roots that went all the way back to the Bronze Age. Her temple in Hierapolis had a lake hundreds of fathoms deep, filled with fantastical fishes, and a bejewelled statue of the goddess whose eyes followed your every movement. But in Rome, Atargatis’ religion was one of underdogs, foreigners, and the marginalized–much like the religion of Dionysus. And, like the cult of Dionysus, it threatened the Roman status quo. Find out what made this Syrian mermaid goddess so phenomenal, powerful, and dangerous to the Roman aristocracy.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends many being killed by a man in power, but in the end he will get his come uppance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 25, 2023

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Feb. 2776 AUC ~ 4 Gamelion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Imagine an ancient Greek or Roman body, and the first picture that pops into your head is probably made of marble or stone – perhaps an austere bust, or a gleaming, musclebound sculpture, polished, cold and pale. But what about the experience of living in a real body, in all its pleasure, pain and flaws, during antiquity? Speaking with Elinor Evans, Caroline Vout presents the flesh and blood realities of life – and death – in ancient Greece and Rome.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends unrest among the enslaved people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 24, 2023

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Feb. 2776 AUC ~ 3 Gamelion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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We’ve talked this season about some biggggg characters. Josephus, Napoleon, Shabbetai Zvi. And this week, meet…Babatha. A wholly unremarkable woman, except for the world she opened up for us through the documents found in her abandoned handbag…2,000 years ago. This week, Schwab and Yael explore gender and rights, Roman bureaucracy and the many legal systems in 2nd century Judea, and the value of a good handbag.

The triumvirate is formed, Vorenus and Pullo get their hands very dirty, Cicero pays the ultimate price for his rhetoric, and Brutus and Cassius make the final stand of the Roman republic with an actual battle scene.

Welcome back for Episode 2! Dr. Sara, Luke, and Sam dive into Homer’s Odyssey to discuss tricksy heroes, visits to the Underworld, murderous rampages, and how loose of an adaptation we think O Brother Where Art Thou is.

That’s right it’s time for actually, run of the mill mythology! Okay, it’s Spartan so actually it’s still pretty weird, and confusing… Because you know, Greek mythology. We’re talking Children of Heracles and all the famous Spartans of the Homeric world. Plus, the myth-making that gave us 300.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends disease following a period of shortages.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 23, 2023

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Feb. 2776 AUC ~ 2 Gamelion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Epaminondas of Thebes is one of the greatest and most revolutionary commanders in military history, destroying the might of Sparta in a single day at the Battle of Leuctra in 371 BC. At that battle, Epaminondas led the outnumbered Theban phalanx to an overwhelming victory over an army of feared Spartan hoplites. Theban victory that day forever changed the political map of Greece. Dur: 20mins File: .mp3

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends peace for the city.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 21, 2023

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Feb. 2776 AUC ~ 30 Poseideion II in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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Numerus Sīnēnsium decrescit …

In this episode we head to the Mediterranean and discover more about Inclusive Maritime Heritage in Southeast Sicily. We explore the ancient fishing traditions of the Marzamemi, discuss shipwrecks, connectivity, and the innovative, reflexive ways the team are working with local communities to tell the story of their maritime past.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends that a king hated by many will be the subject of a final plot

[Sunday] If it thunders today it portends abundance, but also an abundance of mice and deer.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)