#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 27, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Feb. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Gamelion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In the third episode, I explain in as much detail as possible (and with only two klaxons!) why I’m so annoyed similes aren’t given their due reverence (mostly by my students), why they’re not the same as metaphor, why they’re so important in Homeric epic, and how *exactly* to enjoy them.

In this episode of Accessible Art History: The Podcast, I continue the journey through Neoclassical art with Venus Victrix by Antonio Canova.

Classical Athens is famous for the introduction of theatre and Tragedy. But it didn’t just appear out of nowhere. In this episode I try and piece together how it developed and ended up as a main component of the City Dionysia at Athens. All this with rude puppets, wild processions, the odd phallus and politics.

This week Dave and Jeff gambol off near sylvan fields to tackle the earliest example of Vergil’s poetry, the Eclogues. In Eclogue 1 we meet the shepherd Meliboeus lamenting to his friend Tityrus: “How’d I get evicted?” Meanwhile, Tityrus plays his oaten pipes and suggests Rome is over-rusticating. You’ll hear the amoeboean bees a-buzzing and the cattle a-lowing (with a digression on Psalm 23) as we investigate the deeper meanings of bucolic imagery, Greek precedents, and pressed cheeses. Look! Octavian Augustus, smack dab in the center of Vergil’s poetic programme. Speaking of programs, you’ll need one to tell your willows from your chestnuts from your tamarisks from your cypresses from your low-lying myrtles.

Propertius’ girlfriend Cynthia has died suddenly, but he hasn’t seen the last of her… This story has been adapted from Propertius, Elegies, 4.7 and 4.8, and is followed by a chat about Latin love elegy, Roman funerary customs, and the geography of the underworld, including the famous Gates of Sleep.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the outbreak of non-threatening diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 26, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Feb. 2774 AUC ~ 13 Gamelion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In the latest in our series tackling the big questions on major historical topics, Professor Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones, an expert in ancient history, responds to listener questions and popular internet search queries on the Persian empire. Once the largest empire the world had ever seen, Persia was one of the dominant powers of the ancient world.

In this episode of Accessible Art History: The Podcast, I continue the journey through Neoclassical art with Venus Victrix by Antonio Canova. 

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends that many will be slaughtered by a man in power, but in the end he will suffer the same fate.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 25, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Feb. 2774 AUC ~ 12 Gamelion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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S8E2 Our interview with Pompeii Archeologist Eric Poehler!

The legions of Rome were the nucleus of Rome’s military might for centuries. From campaigning in northern Scotland to the Persian Gulf, these devastating battalions extended and cemented Roman power. Yet of these legions there was one whose end is shrouded in mystery: the Ninth Legion. So what might have happened to this legion? Joining me to talk through the theories surrounding the Ninth’s disappearance is Dr Simon Elliott. Simon has recently written a book all about the Ninth’s disappearance, and in this podcast he takes us through the various theories and evidence surrounding this mystery.

300 – 570 – In an episode that could turn out to be worse than a sports programme reporting on a draft or a transfer window, we find out who was going where and at what price during the middle of the first millennium in Europe.

Last time, we saw Agrippina the Younger survive her exile AND a jealous young empress, only to marry her uncle Claudius and become empress herself. What a comeback! What will she do, now that she’s finally achieved the kind of power she’s always dreamed of? You can be sure she’s about to shatter some imperial glass ceilings, but her position will also force her to make difficult and dangerous choices, and confront unimaginable loss.

This episode is all about Alexander the Great, and especially about his reception by later Greeks & Romans, the middle ages, and modern popular culture. We had the pleasure of interviewing Meg Finlayson who studies Alexander and his reception and shared her knowledge, enthusiasm, and dreams of a new Alexander movie with Colin Farrell playing Philip!

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends unrest among the enslaved.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 24, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Feb. 2774 AUC ~ 11 Gamelion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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A quiet Sunday …

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The second episode explains, at some length (and with several klaxons) exactly why the caduceus of Hermes is not correctly used as a medical symbol, and why. And I talk about Hermes a lot.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage followed by disease.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 23, 2021

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Feb. 2774 AUC ~ 10 Gamelion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends internal peace for the city.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)