#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 20, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XIII  Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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In part one of our Halloween special, Kara and Jordan delve into all things *spooky*. Did the ancient Egyptians believe in ghosts? How did the living and the dead interact? What happened to you when you died? Did they have a concept of the soul?

Jeff and Dave wade into the Olympic-sized pool that is Ovid’s masterpiece, the Metamorphoses. After untangling etymological tendrils of the word “vignette”, the guys dive right in. First up, “Apollo and Daphne”. Not happy with Apollo’s arch trash-talk, Cupid shows him who’s really the boss—his arrows unleash unstoppable passion and malodorous disdain between the titular two. This is not the chubby bowman on your Valentine’s card. Then it’s on to “Diana and Actaeon”. What’s the message here? Another defense of chastity? Haunting comment on the goddess’ sacredness? Is Ovid alluding to his own error or the recent Roman past? Maybe he’s whelping on the very conventions of epic? Come on in, the water’s fine, but be careful where you dogpaddle.

Where does religion come from? How did hunter-gatherers build early Neolithic Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey? What’s with the gigantic carved stone pillars and the defleshed human skulls anyway? What is religion, really? Why am I asking you? It’s an episode as profound as it is, well, mystifying.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the reopening of old grievances and for many, extreme suffering as a result.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 19, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XIV Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 13 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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In this episode we discuss Natalie Haynes’s 2019 novel A Thousand Ships. Digressions include identity theft, ancient clothing, and ecofascism. We also spend a while simping for basically every ancient woman mentioned.

Often up there in the upper echelons of most articles listing Rome’s worst emperors, it’s fair to say that history has not been kind to Caracalla. Whether it was contemporary sources depicting him as a deranged Heracles and Alexander the Great loving megalomaniac or the 18th century historian Edward Gibbon labelling him ‘the common enemy of mankind,’ for centuries he has been an epitome of infamy. To talk through what we know about this figure, and whether he deserves this reputation, Tristan was joined by Edinburgh University’s Dr Alex Imrie, an expert on the Severan Dynasty and the author of The Antonine Constitution: An Edict for the Caracallan Empire.

Rome is a gorgeous palimpsest of history and no one knows that better than archaeologist Darius Arya and speleologist Adriano Morabito. Darius and Adriano join Erica for an afternoon chat about Rome.

In 417 CE, the Roman poet Rutilius Namatianus journeyed from Rome back to his homeland of Gaul, not knowing whether there was a home to return to.

The most controversial part of Plato’s Republic is its fifth book, wherein Socrates argues for the political equality of men and women, the abolition of the nuclear family, a strange eugenics program, and the idea that philosophers kings and philosopher queens should be put in charge of political affairs. With us to discuss book 5 is Mary Townsend, assistant professor of philosophy at Saint John’s University in Queens and author of the book The Woman Question in Plato’s Republic.

In this week’s episode Jean Menzies and regular guest Jill Scott welcome back the podcast for a new season by finding out what the most googled questions about Ancient Greece are and have a go at answering them.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the downfall of a ruler or the overthrow of  a monarch, and also portends civil discord and abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 18, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XV Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 12 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a plentiful supply of imported grain.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 16, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XVII Kal. Nov. 2774 AUC ~ 10 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Dēclārātiō Kunmingēnsis; Kurz abdīcat; Lībanus; Tsai Ing-wen lībertātem dēfendit; Senātor Britannus interemptus; Baetylus in domum dēlapsus; Fīnēs aperientur.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends people being so weakened as to be unrecognizable.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 15, 2021

Hodie est Id. Oct. 2774 AUC ~ 9 Pyanepsion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Classical Athens had a principles-based legal system that echoes in many legal systems today. Emeritus Professor Edward Harris, University of Durham, makes a return appearance on the show to discuss what court trials were like in the Classical Athenian period.

Murray is flying solo again this week. He tackles the question ‘why didn’t the Persians react faster to the invasion of 336 BC?’.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage caused by a hot, dry wind affecting the crops.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)