#Thelxinoe ~ Classical News for the Weekend of April 4-5, 2020

Hodie est Non. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 13 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

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Tres amici plurima tractant, inter quae arbores loquentes et amicos imaginarios.

Landscape Modery

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an early summer but a generally healthy year.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 3, 2020

Hodie est a.d. III Non. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 11 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

… the news drought continues …

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

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Lucia hodie quintum annum complet, sol splendet, aves canunt.

THEY SAY THAT POISON IS A WOMAN’S WEAPON OF CHOICE.But these days, it isn’t a very popular weapon. A Washington Post article used the FBI’s Supplemental Homicide Report to show that way more men commit murder than women, and poison is the sixth most common way for a woman to kill. But still, there is this pervasive connection between women and poison: that silent killer that doesn’t require brute strength, but a devious and, some say, womanly cunning. When mysterious deaths happen, it’s often blamed on women and their lethal concoctions: rat poison in the pie, arsenic in the wine. And sometimes that’s what really happened.

But plenty of women from history have been poisoned, too. They flirted with death every day, even if they didn’t know it, dousing themselves in dangerous cosmetics and hair products; wrapping themselves in poisonous clothing, caving to the pressure to look young and beautiful, only to have it be the death of them.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends profit from imported grain supplies.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 2, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 10 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

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Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

I, Podius ain’t your daddy’s I, Claudius-based podcast! On Episode 7 of I, Podius, hosts John Hodgman and Elliott Kalan welcome Patricia Quinn, who played “Livilla,” to the show!

NT Pod 90, “How was the Forgery of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife Confirmed?”, is the final episode in in the series of four podcasts on the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife. It is just over eighteen minutes long.

Dr. Nikolaus Overtoom joins us to discuss the Parthians and the Arsacid dynasty, a group that emerged from the Central Asian Steppes to come into conflict with the Seleucids and Hellenistic kingdoms during early-middle 3rd century B.C.  We talk about Dr. Overtoom’s work regarding early Parthian history, the adaptability of a steppe society ruling over a heavily urbanized Greco-Persian one,  and his upcoming book “Reign of Arrows: The Rise of the Parthian Empire in the Hellenistic Middle East”, which seeks to answer the question of how the Parthians managed to turn from small nomadic tribe to one of the most powerful empires of the ancient world.

This week, Ancient History Fangirl teams up with Liv Albert from Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! to drink wine, drop some f-bombs, and dish about everyone’s favorite god of theatre, orgies, booze and madness. Join us as we explore all the ways Dionysus subverted the Roman patriarchy, theatre practices of the ancient Greeks, woman-centric retellings of Medea and Medusa, and the most radically feminist Greek playwright of his time: Euripides.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a sign of justice bringing prosperity to good humans and paltry things to the evil humans.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 1, 2020

Hodie est Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 9 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

… not a day to be trusting news sources …

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

Ray recently interviewed Lindsay Powell about Caligula. I asked Ray for show notes. This is what he gave me. “We talked of keeping the sources in context, considering the times they lived it and agenda. He went deep. Then his analysis of the events in the German border and the coast of Britain. And his apparent fickleness, which in a ruler, effects everyone but also how people like Suetonius probably used that.” See? That’s what I have to work with.

The interviews in this episode of Classics Confidential were recorded at a workshop entitled The Forgotten Other: Disability Studies and the Classical Body. The workshop took place at Kings College in June 2018: it was organised by Dr Ellen Adams, Senior Lecturer in Classical Art & Archaeology at Kings College London, and Dr Emma-Jayne Graham, Senior Lecturer in Classical Studies at The Open University.

Achilles is back and it’s god vs. god, Greek vs. Trojan, Achilles vs. Hector in the most epic battle of the Trojan War.

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends civil discord and the collapse of fortunes.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 31, 2020

Hodie est pridie Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 8 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

… no entry for March 31!

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)