#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 10, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IV Id. Apr. 2774 AUC ~ 28 Elaphebolion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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The Greeks arrive at Plataea where a number of Skirmishes and raids would take place for some 10 days

O Times, O mores! Yes, we did just use an obnoxious Cicero joke to signal the end of times. Or, more accurately, the end of times you’ll get an episode this season. But don’t worry, we’ve saved the best ‘til last for our season finale. You didn’t think we’d go out like a lead balloon, did you? Sarah and Abi are excited this week to bring you a double helping of raging about Odysseus. In this episode, we take one of Greek myth’s best-loved heroes and … well … rip him a new one. Sarah tries to play devil’s advocate – she makes some good points about his sexual entrapment with Calypso. But all-in-all the positivity doesn’t last long, and this is mostly a tirade about his terrible choices and insufferably vanity. Remember – the tales of Odysseus’ travels home in Homer’s Odyssey are mostly reported speech from the master-wordsmith himself. Big shock, he comes across well.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

if it thunders today, it portends progress for honest people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 9, 2021

Hodie est a.d. V Id. Apr. 2774 AUC ~ 27 Elaphebolion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Penthesilea was one of the most badass Amazons… Until she encountered Achilles. This story is not kind to he of the weak ankle. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

Come, divine lyre, speak to me and sing! Translated by Rayor. Thank you for listening! You can follow us on Twitter & Instagram @sweetbitterpod. You can support us on patreon.com/sweetbitter. Our guests this episode were Jane Montgomery Griffiths, Jade Esteban Estrada, Aimee Suzara, Maya Herbsman and Vanessa Stovall. You can learn more about our guests and where to find them on our website.

It is one of the truly great civilisations in world history and yet the story of Persia has faded from view in the west. Tom Holland and Dominic Sandbrook are joined by Professor Ali Ansari to discuss Persia’s extraordinary influence on the modern world.

Murray tackles this question from Juan; It seems that Phillip/Alexander’s army was almost invincible but afterwards “Macedonian” style armies seem to be a lot more hit and miss (vs. Romans, Indians, Parthians, Celts etc.). Was this because Philip/Alexander’s troops were uniquely competent/trained or were the commanders after Alexander just not as good? I’m mostly thinking about the pike phalanx but if there’s any information on the light infantry or cavalry troops I’d love to learn!

Synopsis:  In the late 14th century BC, the Hittite Great King Suppiluliuma wrested Syria from the grip of the Hurrian kingdom of Mitanni.  Two of his sons would succeed him to the throne, while two others founded new dynasties in the cities of Aleppo and Carchemish.

Between the 3rd century BC and the 1st century AD, the Xiongnu inhabited the area surrounding Mongolia. They influenced the later Hun Empire, and had connections with Ancient China and Persia, but what do we know about them? Bryan Miller has been investigating the society, hierarchy and expansion of the Xiongnu, and in this episode from our sibling podcast The Ancients he shares his findings from the archaeology and historical documents with Tristan. 

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends victory for the kingdom and good cheer for those in power.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 8, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Id. Apr. 2774 AUC ~ 26 Elaphebolion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Can we experience Stoic Joy? Why has there been a dramatic change in how we perceive Stoicism? And how can the ancient philosophy reduce stress and anxiety as well as help us achieve our goals? This week’s Classical Wisdom Speaks Podcast is with William…

Neither of us are professionally or confessionally equipped to answer this question, so we’re bringing in Prof. Shaily Patel, Assistant Professor of Early Christianity at Virginia Tech and baller scholar of magic & religion.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Professor Bettany Hughes, award-winning historian, BBC broadcaster, and author of the best-selling books Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore; The Hemlock Cup: Socrates, Athens, and the Search for the Good Life; and Venus and Aphrodite: History of a Goddess. Prof. Hughes shares insights from […]

John, Leah, and Jac tackle the serious topic of racism in the field of Classics in a special segment focusing on the modern field, before then turning to an introduction to archaeology and the wild and questionable history of its ethics.

The Persepolis Fortification Tablets / Texts are the who’s who of the Ancient Achaemenid Empire, a unique insight into the administrative workings of this jurisdiction emerging from present day Iran. 30,000 of these clay tablets, inscribed in cuneiform, have so far been identified. Each forms a new piece of evidence for who the people of the Achaemenid Empire under Darius I were, where they were, what they did, and even what they ate. Tristan was joined by Professor Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones from Cardiff University to discuss how these texts have completely reshaped our understanding of this civilisation, and how the Ancient Persian perspective has demonstrated its remarkable networks, trade, administration and international travel.

There are many groups that are often overlooked in both ancient and modern societies. One of those are people with disabilities, and we were fortunate to talk to expert Dr Debby Sneed about her work on impairment in antiquity. Dr Sneed has examined a range of sources about this topic, including human remains, temples and textual evidence. Her focus has mostly been on physical impairments that leave a trace in human remains. Sneed’s focus is ancient Greece, but we couldn’t resist bringing Rome into the conversation every now and then!

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends heavy rains bringing disease.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 7, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Id. Apr. 2774 AUC ~ 25 Elaphebolion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Lindsey Davis talks all about her lengthy career bringing Ancient Rome back to life for her readers, and discusses the latest book in her smash hit Flavia Albia series: A Comedy of Terrors.

In this episode we welcome Dr. Ed Watts into the vomitorium. A highly respected historian of Rome from UCSD, Ed talks with Jeff and Dave about his fascinating 2018 book Mortal Republic: How Rome Fell into Tyranny. Come along for the sights, the sounds, and yes, even some of the smells of ancient Rome as Ed explains – to Dave’s chagrin – his antipathy toward Cicero as a person and stylist, but deep respect for the man for his “profound” political insights. Individuals are mortal, but a republic doesn’t have to be. Ed leads us through a careful explanation of the breakdown of Roman society in the final years, and the personal and economic forces that led to tyranny. Be sure to stay tuned to the end where Dr. Watts gives his sobering take on political violence on the American scene. And check out our social media to win 1 of 3 signed copies of Ed’s book we’re giving away, thanks to Basic Books.

It’s time for another episode of The Ozymandias Project with Lexie Henning! Tuck in your togas and hop aboard Trireme Transit for an hour long odyssey as we talk about Pompeii’s toilets and water sanitation, the struggles of funding grad students, and why going to office hours is the greatest advantage for a student.

The discovery of an industrial scale beer brewery at the early Egyptian site of Abydos demonstrates the role of alcohol in ancient societies. Was drinking your dinner on the ruler’s tab a way to keep workers fed, or maybe just to keep them from asking questions like ‘why are we building this stupid pyramid for this so-called king?’

In this episode we discuss Alexander’s love life, his journey to India, and his last epic battle.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends good things and a prosperous Spring.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 6, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VIII Id. Apr. 2774 AUC ~ 24 Elaphebolion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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The illegal trafficking of artifacts is an ongoing problem in archaeology. Dr. Donna Yates joins the hosts to discuss her work in tracking trafficked antiquities and how this problem can be stopped. This episode originally aired on January 1, 2018.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends civil wars.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)