#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 15, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XVIII Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 13 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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A podcast with Mark Fleishman and Mandla Mbothwe Reimagining Tragedy from Africa and the Global South (ReTAGS) is a project led by Mark Fleishman and Mandla Mbothwe. In this episode, Mark and Mandla discuss the project’s aims, reimagining the concept of tragedy from a perspective in Africa that is directed at the complex challenges of our global postcolonial present and towards our possible futures both inside and outside of the discipline.

Liv speaks with researcher Flint Dibble all about the archaeology of the Mediterranean, what we know about Plato’s Atlantis, and more importantly: what we know about Athens from the Bronze Age and earlier! Twitter threads mentioned in the episode: Atlantis in current pop culture, the dangers of Atlantis “lore”, erotic vases. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday]  If it thunders today, it portends a revolt of enslaved persons, their punishment, and an abundance of crops.

[Sunday] If it thunders today, it portends the oppression of the people by the king.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 14, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XIX Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 12 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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‘To the Greeks and Romans, the Trojan War was the beginning of all warfare and set the standards for the expected behaviour of all men. How does the epic fit actual history?’ The Ancient Warfare podcast team discuss the latest issue of the magazine X.3 Warfare in the Age of Homer.

The eve of the Greek and Persian wars would see a point in Macedonian history where the transition of power from one king to another would take place. This would see Amyntas after his rule since the mid 6th century pass power to his son Alexander the first at the opening of the 5th. This would take place on the backdrop of Persian advances into Thrace before Macedon would then begin engaging diplomatically. It becomes difficult to tell at what point Macedon would offer earth and water to the Persian empire, with colourful stories entering into the historical record. Though, by the time of the first invasion it seems Macedon had submitted in some form. The marriage of Alexanders sister to a Persian governor, also a relative of Xerxes would seem to indicate this…

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends shortages, an outbreak of mice, and the demise of four-footed animals.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 13, 2022

Hodie est Id. Ian. 2775 AUC ~ 11 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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The fact that many of the marbles from the Parthenon reside in the British Museum (London) has been controversial since they first landed there in the early 19th century. In this complex tale Lord Elgin has often played the villain—he being the one who greedily had the sculptures removed from Athens to decorate his drafty Scottish mansion. But is the story that simple? In this episode Dave and Jeff tell the whole story front to back with an eye to several questions: does Elgin perhaps deserve a bit more sympathy than he usually gets? What are the arguments for keeping the artifacts in London, and for repatriation? Why should Lord Byron—noted defacer of Greek monuments—get a pass? My goodness, what on earth happened to Lord Elgin’s nose? And, will the guys ever stop attempting Scottish accents?

The year 446 BCE has it all – battles, civil strife, virtus, dynamic leadership… Rome is certainly on a better path after the mysterious and seemingly disastrous 447 BCE.

At its height, the Seleucid Empire stretched from Thrace (modern day Bulgaria) to the Indus River Valley. Emerging from the tumultuous ‘Successor Wars’ that followed Alexander the Great’s passing, for over a century it was a superpower of the eastern Mediterranean. This, however, ultimately led it into conflict with Rome at the beginning of the 2nd century BC. The result was a devastating defeat for the Seleucid King Antiochus III ‘the Great’ at the Battle of Magnesia, fought around this time of year in either December 190 BC or January 189 BC. Following the battle, the Seleucids were humbled by a damaging treaty, but what happened next? What followed for the Seleucids, having been humbled by the Romans? Did they descend from superpower to suppliant? Or did they experience a resurgence? In today’s podcast, Eduardo Garcia-Molina, a PHD Classics student at the University of Chicago, argues the latter. Focusing in on the reign of Antiochus IV, Eduardo highlights how the Seleucid Empire remained a powerful entity in the wake of Magnesia and their Roman defeat.

In ancient Rome, being made Emperor could be a death sentence. Experienced generals and statesmen lasted weeks or months sometimes. In some cases, children were raised to the role. What became of them? Part 1 of our series looks at two very different kinds of child tyrant: Elagabalus and Caracalla.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 12, 2022

Hodie est pr. Id. Ian. 2775 AUC ~ 10 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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The Roman fort functioned as a base of operations for the army, a defensive and functional structure that could protect both the frontier of the Roman Empire and the supply lines. Guest: Dr Adrian Goldsworthy (historian and author, whose most recent work of fiction is titled ‘The Fort’).

The LEGO Colosseum is one of the largest LEGO sets available, containing more that 9000 pieces. It has been designed on such a scale to convey the monumental nature of the Colosseum in Rome, and contains many design elements that reflect those of the building. Guest: Rok Zgalin Kobe (Senior Designer, LEGO Group)

Francesca Peacock speaks to The Guardian’s chief culture writer Charlotte Higgins about her Greek Myths: A New Retelling, illustrated by Chris Ofili. How does weaving wind its way through ancient culture? How do you go about retelling stories that have been told so many times before?

WELCOME BACK to Actually Interesting History! In the first episode of Season 3 we explore the Great Sphinx! In this episode we cover what a sphinx is, the history of the archaeological excavations, and some ~interesting~ theories about who built it!!

Sermo 115, quo audientibus app “Legentibus” commendo, quo licet libros Latine a Daniel Pettersson recitatos auscultare.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends damage to men’s reputations but there will be plenty of fodder for beasts of burden and an abundance of fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 11, 2022

Hodie est a.d. III Id. Ian. 2775 AUC ~ 9 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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2021 was a bumper year for archaeological discoveries across Britain. In this episode, we go on a whistlestop tour of some of the most notable finds — from an immaculately preserved Roman mosaic found on a working farm, to the puzzling ruin of a Norman church discovered by HS2 engineers. Dan is joined by author and broadcaster Professor Alice Roberts, who got to see many of these discoveries first hand and meet the people who found them during the filming of the latest series of Digging For Britain.

Egypt’s history since the fall of the Ptolemaic dynasty in 30 BC has been one of continual invasion and reinvasion. During the nineteenth century, when France and Britain began to take notice of this lucrative and strategically placed Ottoman territory, there was a boom of European interest in ancient Egyptian culture, fed by the ready availability of well-preserved ancient papyri and objects in Egypt. This week, Shivaike Shah talks to Dr Heba Abd el Gawad from University College London and Dr Usama Ali Gad from Ain Shams University about the colonisation of Egyptology and its legacy in the modern museum and university. While western museums highlight what the many Egyptian objects in their possession tell us about the ancient civilisation, those objects’ continued presence reveals more about the modern relationship between Egypt and Europe than their connection in the classical past.

The story of Atlantis has fascinated the world for centuries… But how many of us know where the story came from, or what is actually included in the original source? Episode one of Deconstructing Atlantis dives into the story of Atlantis as it exists in the Timaeus and Critias. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

Julius Caesar crossed the banks of the Rubicon river with his legion on this day (maybe) over 2000 years ago. In the first of a two-parter, Tom explains how Caesar rose to become powerful enough to take the decision that would eventually lead to him becoming the sole ‘dictator’ of Rome.

Now ready to take on Pompey and the Senate, Julius Caesar must take the final step and cross over into Italy with his legion.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a hot summer and plenty of imports from foreign countries.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)