#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 20, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Oct. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Boedromion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Liv speaks with Dr. Cora Beth Fraser all about the Minotaur, Asterion, in the Labyrinth in all its forms and how he relates to autistic people and autism! Follow Cora Beth on Twitter here, follow the new resource for neuro-divergency in Classics, Asterion, on Twitter here and check out Asterion’s website here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

Historian and author Dr. Emma Southon returns to the Ancients to shine a light on the life – and murder – of Publius Claudius Pulcher (aka Clodius), and why this horrible, colourful figure was so significant in the demise of the Roman Republic.

The title of Caesar has echoed down the ages as the pinnacle of absolute power and perhaps even tyranny. A single man at the head of a nation or empire with untouchable power. But how powerful were they really and why are they seen as an example to follow when many of the men who became Caesar met a bloody end? Dan is joined by the legendary classicist Mary Beard to explore the history of the first twelve Caesars. They discuss how these autocratic rulers have been portrayed throughout history, how the Roman Empire was really ruled and how their legacy still lives with us today.

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Alia

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the downfall of a famous man and war.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 18, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XIV Kal. Oct. 2774 AUC ~ 12 Boedromion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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The Derveni Papyrus is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. This wide-ranging conversation covers Prof. Janko’s research on the Derveni Papyrus, Europe’s oldest surviving manuscript from the 4th century BCE and the most important text relating to early Greek literature, science, religion and philosophy to have come to light since the Renaissance.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

{Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends both famine and wars.

[Sunday]  If it thunders today, it portends a successful season of growing fruit, but there will be disease and conspiracies among the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 17, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XV Kal. Oct. 2774 AUC ~ 11 Boedromion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Murray answers this question sent in by Brian ‘The romans took a lot of slaves when they won a battle but how did they turn an angry defeated warrior into a pliant slave?’

During the Late Bronze Age, the Cypriots had a variety of settlements, their own language, and were sea faring. Louise Steel, Professor, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, joins the show to share what civilization was like on the island during this period of time.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of necessities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 16, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XVI Kal. Oct. 2774 AUC ~ 10 Boedromion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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After the Bronze Age, life on the Island of Crete continued. Dr Saro Wallace, Senior Research Fellow, Gerda Henkel Research Foundation, joins the show to explain what civilization was like in this period of time on the island.

In the aftermath of Caesar’s death, the forces that would ultimately shape the rest of Cleopatra’s life began to take form. Marc Antony and Octavian were about as different as two people could be and became uneasy allies as they fought against Caesar’s assassins. While Cleopatra leave Rome and returns to Egypt to rule, Rome soon comes calling again….

This is part two of a massive two-and-a-half-hour chat we had recently Edward J. Watts, a professor of history at the University of California, San Diego, and author and editor of several prize-winning books, including THE FINAL PAGAN GENERATION, a great book about HYPATIA, a book out about the collapse of the Roman Republic, MORTAL REPUBLIC, and his latest book is THE ETERNAL DECLINE AND FALL OF ROME.

In our last few episodes on sex workers in ancient Greece, we tried to paint a picture of a group of women, in some cases, with more freedom and independence than most in the ancient Greek world could dream of. But that freedom came at a price.

Episode 117 – The Death of the Decemvirate The Partial Historians History Listen on Apple Podcasts We have been trapped under the tyrannical rule of the Second Decemvirate for too long! But never fear, listeners. Their day has finally come. In this episode, we finally see the decemvirs overthrown and the office of tribune of the plebs restored. It is a time of non-stop drama!

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends good germination of plants but they will not bear fruit.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 15, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XVII Kal. Oct. 2774 AUC ~ 9 Boedromion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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This week Jeff and Dave wrap their look at Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, doing their best to break down the essentials all the while dodging those clinamen-controlled atoms. Because according to Luc these little cueballs explain everything. Earthquakes? Swerving atoms. Human speech? Swerving atoms. That dream you had about being late for your myth final while inexplicably juggling fuchsia avocados? Swerving atoms. Tune in to discover how the world blows its nose, and how to answer your kids’ awkward questions, e.g., “Mom, where do centaurs come from?” And if you get nabbed for drinking the detritus-laced milk straight from the breakfast bowl of Cinnamon Toast Crunch? Just tell ‘em the atoms made you do it.

In this episode, I take a bit of a broader look at ancient Greece in the 7th – 4th centuries BCE (Archaic and Classical Greece) and discuss some of the reasons why natural philosophy arose here at this time.

In this interview we speak to Legionary Pullo himself, Ray Stevenson. Ray’s performance as Pullo was the heart of Rome, and he bought a loveable roguish every-man quality to the role while at the same time isn’t someone that I’d want to mess with. In the years since Rome he’s become famous as friend of Thor Volstag in the Marvel films and appeared in major roles in the television shows Vikings and Black Sails. He spoke to us recently from Bulgaria where he’s shooting a new film. Raising Standards, an occasional rewatch podcast of HBO’s Rome, hosted by Rhiannon Evans and Matt Smith of the Emperors of Rome podcast.

Remember the moment in Episode 2 when Hermes gives Perseus that cool sword?  In our first Live from Mount Olympus Mythlet, find out what makes the sword so special – and why it has that wicked curve to it.  Dr. Kate Birney, who is an expert on ancient weapons and teaches archaeology at Wesleyan University, is our guide to the mythical roots of this powerful weapon.

Emperor Diocletian went to great lengths to overhaul the entire structure of the Roman Empire, to extricate Rome from the Crisis of the Third Century. As well as to better serve the Roman people themselves who had become largely neglected during the crisis. None of Diocletian’s reforms were perhaps more sweeping than those for the Roman military, and for Roman civilian administration.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

  • If it thunders today, it portends a period of rain, but also prosperity.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)