#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 17, 2021

Hodie est ad. XV Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 7 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Cleopatra’s dad did something really impressive for a Ptolemaic pharaoh, he managed to die of old age! However, his reign had is challenges. In this episode, we cover Cleopatra’s early life and her dad’s reign. So grab some wine (T12 would approve) and get ready to meet the Romans, make some expensive friends, and play the flute!

Livia, also known as Julia Augusta, was wife of the first emperor and mother of the second. Professor & Head of the Classics Department at Royal Holloway, University of London, Dr Richard Alston, joins the show again to discuss what scholars know about Livia’s life.

The story of Verginia is an achingly tragic tale central to understanding the Second Decemvirate. Both Livy and Dionysius of Halicarnassus go into some detail about what happens and how it unfolds and we’ll explore both accounts to compare and contrast them.

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life and ideas of one of the great historians, best known for his History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (published 1776-89). According to Gibbon (1737-94) , the idea for this work came to him on 15th of October 1764 as he sat musing amidst the ruins of Rome, while barefooted friars were singing vespers in the Temple of Jupiter. Decline and Fall covers thirteen centuries and is an enormous intellectual undertaking and, on publication, it became a phenomenal success across Europe.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends days of searing heat and destruction by mice, blind mice, and locusts. Even so, there will be abundance, but also murders of people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 16, 2021

Hodie est ad. XVI Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 6 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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This week Jeff and Dave do some spelunking to try figure out what the strange mystery rites of the Persiany cult of Mithras were all about, and why they were so popular during the Roman Empire. We begin with a breakdown of what exactly a “mystery cult” is, and then move on to Mithras himself, a hero whose myths do not survive in any written form. What do we make of the strange iconography that does survive, such as the bull-slaying motif (tauroctony)? Was this some kind of death-killing, solar cult? What is that scorpion up to? And can we take Mithras seriously in that hat? So, wander down into the Mithraeum, have a snack or two, and peek into that mysterious box. Might just change your life.

Gaius Marius was a Roman Consul an unprecedented seven times, and lived in a period of much military turmoil and activity in Rome. Dr Federico Santangelo, Newcastle University, joins the show again to share what’s known about Marius’ life.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of the necessities of life and also war; in addition, a prosperous man will disappear from public life.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 15, 2021

Hodie est ad. XVII Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 5 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Is the third millennium BCE burial mound at Tell Banat in north Syria a war memorial to the site’s defenders? What moves the living to take a random sample of human and animal bones and bury them in a mound that looms over their community? What is a kunga anyway and how does the modern sport of donkey basketball fit in? Our panelists are strangely eloquent, in an episode not to be missed.

Hello! And welcome to the 39th episode of Hammer House of Podcast, where Paul Cornell (Doctor Who, Elementary) and L.M. Myles (Verity!) discuss, in order of UK release, every horror movie made by Hammer Film Productions between 1955 and 1976, from The Quatermass Xperiment to To the Devil… A Daughter. This month, we review 1967’s The Viking Queen, with guest Antony Keen.

The Samnites were an ancient group of people that lived amongst the Apennine Mountains in the Italian Peninsula. Dr Rafael Scopacasa joins the show to discuss what’s known about who they were and how they lived.

In this episode, Dr. Blair Fowlkes Childs joins Chelsea and Melissa to talk about clothing, dress, identity, preservation, commemoration, and cultural heritage! Focusing on art historical analyses of ancient funerary portraits from Palmyra (modern Syria), we explore memory and permanence, and dive into issues of protecting our collective past for the future.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends injuries for birds in the summer and the death of fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 14, 2021

Hodie est ad. XVIII Kal. Jul. 2774 AUC ~ 4 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

n.b. I’m thinking of skipping doing this post on Sundays … my Explorator newsletter is increasingly taking much longer to compile on Sunday mornings than it has in the past and it’s just too long to be sitting on my laptop!

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Heus, you want to learn Latin? Salve sodalis, you have come to the right place. This is a Latin podcast for beginners. With the series “Litterae Latinae Simplices”, you will set up for a journey into Latin literature, in easy spoken Latin.

Constantine I became a Christian, founded Constantinople, was involved in numerous military affairs, and more, during his reign as Roman Emperor. Dr. David Potter, University of Michigan, joined the show to discuss Constantine’s reign as a Roman emperor.

Santorini, in the context of the Bronze Age, was called Thera. Professor of Archaeology, Dr Louise Hitchcock, The University of Melbourne, joins the show again to discuss what civilization was like on Thera during the Bronze Age.

Plataea is one of the many forgotten battles of the ancient world. A grand coalition of Greek city-states came together in a massive show of strength to oppose the Persian Empire. Nonetheless, the odds were still against the Greeks–as they had been at Marathon–at Thermopylae– at Salamis, and now, at Plataea. Mardonius, as a general, is still quite capable of finishing the job his King had started a year before. Only through a united effort would Athens and Sparta triumph over the vast numbers of Persia.

Situated on the western coast of the Red Sea in antiquity were a series of thriving seaports, bringing in trade from as far as way as Sir Lanka. Key mercantile centres, where goods made in Iberia could theoretically have been sold alongside items crafted thousands of miles to the east, in South East Asia. Of these seaports, one of the most remarkable has to be Berenike, a thriving cosmopolitan trading centre, first for the Hellenistic Ptolemaic Kingdom and later for Imperial Rome. To talk through the site’s extraordinary archaeology we were delighted to be joined by Professor Steven Sidebotham from the University of Deleware. Steve has been leading excavations at the site for several years and in this podcast he highlights why Berenike is one of the most exciting archaeological locations anywhere in the World.

Welcome back folks to the Spartan History Podcast. Stepping back into the solo format to once again put another facet of pre-classical Sparta under the microscope. This time it is the ruling class, the Homoioi or Spartiates as they referred to themselves. This section of society, dedicated entirely to the pursuit of warfare, were propped up by the helot class who managed their vast land holdings. There was a complex system of land tenure within Sparta which was designed to provide for each the cost of his citizenship, that is the monthly contribution of produce to the dining halls every Spartiate was obliged to dine at. We’ll break down the system of land ownership and how it relates to the mess halls. Along with this I’ll describe in brief the marital practices within the upper echelons of the Spartan world. Famed for their equality, we’ll finish this episode by looking at the massive differences between the individual Homoioi and see why that word is better translated as ‘similars,’ rather than ‘equals.’

Join Sobia with her childhood friend Jasmine Elmer from ‘Classics For all’ discussing bringing Classical subjects into state schools. Abid Patel, Google Educator and Innovator is also on talking about both courses and how he went Global.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends burning hot weather but the harvest will be abundant and there will be a decent flow of river fish.  Even so, human bodies will be weakened.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for June 12, 2021

Hodie est pr. Id. Jun. 2774 AUC ~ 1 Skirophorion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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  • a quiet Saturday

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“Screw your winged horse, I want a Manticore!” We break down the first four episodes of Netflix’s original anime series with repeat guest Christie Vogler and newcomer Zoé Thomas. We dig into the show’s pop cultural influences, its novel takes on mythology and the design choice to make everyone super hot. We also talk at length about Hera’s anger, Zeus’ faults and convenient vases depicting exactly the myth you need to tell. The mention of unmixed wine also really shakes our kraters. Additional questions: Would a similar show set in Rome with as much attention to artistic style feature too many ugly sculpture? How many brains does a three headed dog need? Should we all just play kottabos when we party? We also introduce new literary lens where all stories are actually about Alexander the Great.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

if it thunders today, it portends the same thing as yesterday.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)