Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of October 24-25, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 8 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Synopsis:  In the 4th century AD, the Ethiopian kingdom of Axum converted to Christianity even as the neighboring Himyarites of Yemen converted to Judaism.  Centuries later, Axum’s invasion of Yemen to stop the persecution of Christians triggered a conflict with Persia. Map of the kingdoms […]

Bloodsports!!! It’s the match of last century! Maya Ball Players vs Gladiators! Join Dr. Karen Bellinger as she speaks with Andrew Kinkella and Cody Amens about what it took be an athlete in two different times and places, and whether or not one match would mean certain death. (recorded over zoom)

In October 42 BC the Roman Republic committed suicide. Near the town of Philippi in northern Greece the forces of Brutus and Cassius, the famous assassins of Julius Caesar and the last surviving cheerleaders of the Roman Republic, faced off against the armies of Marc Antony and young Octavian. Two separate battles were fought, the results of which decided the future direction of Rome. In this Ancients podcast, Tristan was joined by Steele Brand (@steele_brand) to talk through these all-important battles. From the background to Brutus’ pitiful demise Steele explains the final Roman attempts to restore the Republic and how they were ultimately squashed by a combination of political brilliance, suicidal blunders and outrageous luck. Steele is the author of ‘Killing for the Republic: Citizen Soldiers and the Roman Way of War’. Quick note: Lycia is a region in southwest Anatolia, on the Mediterranean coast.

Daughter of Rome’s most venerated war hero, favorite granddaughter of its first emperor, wife of one of its most shining stars, Agrippina the Elder was born to be famous, thrust into the spotlight, whether she wanted to bask in it or not. But she also made her own spotlight, always fighting for what she believes in – and against those who would do her family harm. Let’s explore the beginnings of Agrippina’s story and bask in the latter half of Livia’s. 

14 – 68 – Although we covered the life and reign of Augustus in previous episodes, we can now explore the reigns of emperors 2, 3, 4 and 5 as we find out more about the unpredictability of Rome deciding to go back to a monarchical constitution in order to regulate the powerful Roman Senate.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends serious misery as the result of misfortunes.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Sponsored Post Gardening Calendar (Australian Temperate Climate) – NovemberDeep Green Permaculture

It’s November, the last month of spring, the weather is moderate, deciduous trees are in leaf again, days are warm and there’s lots of green growth in the garden. The changeable and windy weather from October continues, but now there’s also the possibility of very sudden hot weather striking without warning so it’s important to protect plants from sun and wind. Also, regularly water newly planted trees and shrubs as the hot weather and strong winds can quickly dry out the soil.

Things to Do This Month:

  • Mulch around fruit trees and plants to retain moisture in the soil and prevent water loss from evaporation (keep mulch away from plant stems and trunks as this can cause stem rot/collar rot).
  • Mulch strawberries by placing straw underneath to keep the berries off the soil.
  • Propagate strawberries from runners.
  • Plant potted fruit trees and vines (having roots, can be planted anytime, best in spring & autumn).
  • Tie growing vines back to supports or wires.
  • Propagate plants by taking softwood (green) cuttings from now till January (after which they harden off).
  • Last chance to plant evergreen shrubs and trees (this includes citrus trees).
  • In ponds and water gardens, thin out existing aquatic plants, continue planting new ones, fertilise aquatic plants and feed fish regularly.

Vegetables and Herbs to Sow:

Sow in November Harvest (weeks)
Amaranth ds 7-8
Angelica ds 18 months
Asparagus d 2-3 years
Asparagus Pea d 8-11
Beetroot ds 7-10
Borage ds 8-10
Burdock d 17-18
Cape Gooseberry ds 14-16
Carrot d 12-18
Chicory d 16-24
Chinese cabbage ds 8-10
Chives ds 7-11
Climbing beans d 9-11
Coriander d 30-45
Cucumber d 8-10
Dwarf beans d 7-10
French tarragon d 30-40 days
Globe Artichokes s 42-57
Horseradish d 16-24
Jerusalem Artichokes d 15-20
Kohlrabi d 7-10
Lemon balm s 8-10
Lettuce ds 8-12
Mustard greens d 5-8
Okra ds 11-14
Oregano s 6-8
Parsley ds 9-19
Pumpkin ds 15-20
Radish d 5-7
Rhubarb d 12 months
Rocket d 21-35 days
Rosella s 21-25
Rosemary d 12 months
Sage d 18 months
Salsify d 14-21
Silverbeet ds 7-12
Summer savory d 6-10
Sunflower ds 10-11
Sweet corn ds 11-14
Turnip d 6-9
Yacon d 25

Key:
d = sow directly into ground
s = sow in seed tray
ds = sow directly into ground or seed tray
*= frost tender
**= sow after frost

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#Thelxiope ~ Classics in Landscape Mode for October 24, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 7 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

This week’s video-based gleanings; page might take a while to load:

Robinson College

Classical Association Northern Ireland

A Taste of the Ancient World

Herodotus Helpline

Satura Lanx

Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

David Amster

History Marche

Ancient History Guy

Christian Lehmann

Olympia Kyklos

Archaeology Now

Paideia Media

Peopling the Past

Center for Hellenic Studies

University of Iowa Classics

Invicta

Classics in Color

Natalie Haynes

Extra Credits

Athena Productions

Wessex Archaeology

Classical Wisdom

Digital Hammurabi

Smarthistory

D Midgley

Epimetheus

CAARI Cyprus

Walter M. Roberts III

Great Military Battles

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 23, 2020

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 6 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

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Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Fresh Podcasts

In October 42 BC the Roman Republic committed suicide. Near the town of Philippi in northern Greece the forces of Brutus and Cassius, the famous assassins of Julius Caesar and the last surviving cheerleaders of the Roman Republic, faced off against the armies of Marc Antony and young Octavian. Two separate battles were fought, the results of which decided the future direction of Rome. I was delighted to get the brilliant Steele Brand (@steele_brand) back on the podcast to talk me through these all-important battles. From the background to Brutus’ pitiful demise Steele guided me through the final Roman attempts to restore the Republic and how they were ultimately squashed by a combination of political brilliance, suicidal blunders and outrageous luck.

What makes a monster? Why are ancient monsters so cool? And how can mythology help us in our day to day lives? Dr. Liz Gloyn, Senior Lecturer in Classics at Royal Holloway, University of London, UK and author of “The Ethics of the Family in Seneca…

Robert asks, ‘Was the Roman Army of the later Roman Empire really that bad as everyone believes? Were they really a shadow of the republican and early empire legions? Although they were defeated at Adrianople, other than that battle, they seemed to have done rather well against foreign enemies but were just stretched too thin and always involved in civil strife.’

In this episode, we discuss the years 409-406 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the Athenians’ achieving control in the Hellespont and Bosporus, Alcibiades’ triumphant return to Athens, the ascension of Lysander and his bromance with Cyrus, the Athenian defeat at Notium and the disgrace of Alcibiades, Kallikratidas victory over Konon at Mytilene, and the subsequent Battle of Arginusae with its disastrous consequences for the Athenians.

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a very happy people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 22, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 5 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

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Public Facing Classics

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This week Dave and Jeff watch—sometimes through their fingers—Wolfgang’s Petersen’s sweaty, beardy epic, Troy (2004).  Come along as we revisit the film after several years of peaceful forgetfulness. Was it as bad as we thought? More fit for a shampoo commercial than a tour-de-force of bravado aristeia? Some highlights: a) musing over whether the film embodies a “Homeric Spirit” b) the “Tiresias” award for most obnoxious performance (Orlando, we’re looking at you), and c) the real question, better with the gods or without? Don’t be a heel—tune in.

A classic haunted house story for Halloween – a philosopher rents an old house with suspiciously cheap rent and the sound of clanking chains in the night… This story is taken from Pliny the Younger, Letters, 7.27.5-11. After the story, Dr Tony Keen of the University of Notre Dame in London joins me for a chat about Pliny, urban legends, the fantastic in the ancient world, and about working for the Roman Emperor.

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends bad conditions and assorted diseases for the people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 21, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 4 Pyanepsion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

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Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

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Mary Rose regular Emma Sothon joins us to talk all about her new book on murder in Ancient Rome. We promise you, no giraffes were harmed in the recording of this podcast, nor people making up weird sex stories about them. However weird they are.  Buy the book! A Fatal Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

In this episode of The Catholic Talk Show, the guys discover and explore lost books and manuscripts that almost were part of the Bible.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today it portends an outbreak of a coughing sickness and heart maladies.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)