#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 4, 2019

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Quintiles (Iulias) 2772 AUC ~  3 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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The complex relationship between the patricians and plebeians is central to our appreciation of the 460s BCE. In this episode we’ll get to consider the complexities first hand with the entrance of Caeso Quinctius (remember this name, he’s going places!).

We jump back into the narrative history of c. 461 BCE with our guides of the moment, Livy and Dionysius of Halicarnassus. Both are writing long after these events, which means that their accounts leave a lot to be desired at times. Nevertheless, both are interested in presenting a narrative on the theme of power. How is it distributed? Who has it and who doesn’t? And what are the mechanisms of political power in this system of armies, consuls, patricians, and plebeians?

Ancient Greece is notorious for keeping women silent, veiled, and firmly fixed beside the loom. But was life for the ladies in places like Athens really so restrictive? What did they get up to behind those veils and shaded screens? Let’s time travel back to the Classical period to find out what it was like to be them.

When Julius Caesar arrived in Egypt, he walked into a civil war between the country’s new co-rulers: Ptolemy XIII and his sister Cleopatra.

The romance between Caesar and Cleopatra is one of the most epic of ancient times. But we can’t tell you that story until you understand who Cleopatra was. And to understand Cleopatra, you have to understand the political element in which she swam.

In this episode, we take you from the cutthroat intrigue of the Ptolemaic court to the volatile streets of Alexandria—and from Cleopatra’s early life to the events that led her to take an extreme gamble and team up with the man who’d just conquered Rome.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Alia

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#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 3, 2019

Hodie est a.d. V Non. Quintiles (Iulias) 2772 AUC ~  2 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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In Case You Missed it

Latin/Greek News

Fresh Bloggery

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

 

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 2, 2019

Hodie est a.d. VI Non. Quintiles (Iulias) 2772 AUC ~  1 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Hoc in colloquio, Augustus et Catharina, Iusto absente, carmen quoddam e Carminibus Buranis sumptum cantant enodantque

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 1, 2019

Hodie est a.d. Kal. Quintiles (Iulias) 2772 AUC ~  29 Skirophorion in the second year of the 699th Olympiad

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Dunstan joins David to discuss his research on the grotesque in the Roman World and how it compares to today. What was considered ugly in Roman society? Why were some scars respectable and others not? What is the ‘uncanny valley’? Dunstan also chats about his other main area of study: the ancient world in video games. He reflects on being initially resistant to reception studies, but how a chat in the pub changed his mind and led him to explore this topic. How realistic do we want games set in the ancient world to be? How might they be incorporated into the curriculum? How do they create alternate histories? What is Dunstan’s favourite beat-em up franchise?

Phil Perkins talks about an Etruscan bronze figurine from Monte Falterona.

Professional Matters

Alia

 

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for June 28, 2019

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Quintiles (Iulias) 2772 AUC ~  26 Skirophorion in the second year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

Iszi meets curator Peter Higgs and discusses how ancient Greek buildings and sculptures were assembled – and how they were destroyed

My guest this week is Legonium’s Anthony Gibbins. You might already know Anthony’s work from his Twitter presence @tutubuslatin and/or legonium.com where Latin meets Lego to form fun resources for learning the language. We caught up on Skype to talk about what inspired Anthony to start Legonium, the novel that moved him to learn Latin, and some tricks of the teaching trade.

Dramatic Receptions

Alia