#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 17, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XVI Kal. Iun. 2775 AUC ~ 17 Thargelion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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Persephone is terrified when an enormous being appears from the depths of the rushing river.  But could the River Styx have just the wit and wisdom Persephone needs to hear?

This episode is part of our abortion rights takeover. We’ll be back to our regularly scheduled series on gender rebels on June 2. In this re-release, Kate from the Exploress podcast joined us to discuss the intimate lives of sex workers in ancient Greece and Rome–including methods of contraception and abortion. Pliny the Elder interviewed sex workers to get the lowdown on how they dealt with unwanted pregnancies (but we suspect the ladies were having him on).

Revisiting Liv’s favourite myth in much more detail… What happens when a hero marries a goddess? The story of Cadmus and Harmonia, the mysterious and yet deeply important couple and the origins of their family’s curse.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends rain.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 16, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XVII Kal. Iun. 2775 AUC ~ 16 Thargelion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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The Persian empire constituted the greatest threat to Greek independence the individual city-states had yet faced. Indeed, it was a threat of such dire concern that its degree would not be equalled until the Roman conquest of Greece in the 2nd century BCE….

A discussion of a sample of the plays by Lope de Vega The Gardener’s Dog: A Comedy The meaning of the title, a plot summary, the major themes. Punishment Without Vengeance: A Tragedy. A plot summary, it’s debt to Seneca, the ironic triangle of anti-heroes, the question of incest, and the violence of the honour culture. The historical context of the play.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the need for expiation due to terrible news.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 14, 2022

Hodie est pr. Id.Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 14 Thargelion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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Nero launches a series of attacks that result in the demise of certain members of the Roman elite. But why these particular people? And why now? We tease apart Tacitus to try to work out what’s really going on.

Britannī quīntam partem pūblicōrum dīmittunt

Philosophers today often dismiss Plato’s Theory of Forms as an outdated and failed attempt by a pre-modern thinker to explain knowledge. However, cognitive scientist John Vervaeke offers a radically different take on Plato’s theory and how it ties in with recent debates about the nature of intelligence. John Vervaeke is a professor at the University of Toronto and the creator of the popular YouTube series Awakening from the Meaning Crisis.

Part two of Liv’s conversation with Eduardo García-Molina who studies the Hellenistic Period and the Seleukids specificially, they talk Hellenistic kings and empires, the cultures and people of the east, and so much more (including video games)! 

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday]  If it thunders today, it portends a war in the east and many shortages.

[Sunday] If it thunders today, it portends abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 13, 2022

Hodie est a.d. III Id.Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 13 Thargelion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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What happened to people in ancient Rome who were freed from slavery? Turns out there were still invisible threads–economic pressures, imbalances of status, and debts owed to wealthy patrons–that kept many of them in bondage. On the streets of Pompeii, freedom came at a steep price–especially for women. Today, we talk to Elodie Harper–bestselling author of the Wolf Den and the House with the Golden Door–about enslaved people, freedwomen, and glamorous sex workers whose lives were far more precarious than they seemed.

Antony becomes disgruntled with the tedious administrative duties of running an Empire. Cleopatra makes an unexpected appearance, pushing for the legitimacy of her son by Caesar, and Vorenus embarks upon his latest career path as a crime boss of the Aventine.

The legion that wrested control of the Mediterranean region from Carthage and the Successor states is very familiar. But some notions have recently been challenged. Following the discussion of the Roman legion in episode 119, the Ancient Warfare team returns to the topic with this episode looking at issue XV.4 of the magazine.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a rise in rivers and diseases for humans.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 12, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IV Id.Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 12 Thargelion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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The treatment of mental health has been rapidly growing and improving over the past few decades, but it actually goes back thousands of years. Whether it was the Ancient Greek physician Galen’s humoral theory – in which people’s mental health was determined by imbalances in the levels of four different substances in the body – or Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius’ meditations for guidance and self-improvement, ideas of mental health and its treatment have ranged from the intriguing to the totally bizarre, but many of them still have uses to this day. Tristan is joined once again by Dr Nick Summerton practicing doctor and author of ‘Greco-Roman Medicine and What it Can Teach Us Today’, published by Pen & Sword.

Jacob Mchangama explores the global history of free speech, discussing its ancient origins, staunchest defenders and biggest critics. Speaking to Matt Elton, he also reveals the ways the right to speak freely has been threatened at moments of social upheaval.

What happened to people in ancient Rome who were freed from slavery? Turns out there were still invisible threads–economic pressures, imbalances of status, and debts owed to wealthy patrons–that kept many of them in bondage. On the streets of Pompeii, freedom came at a steep price–especially for women. Today, we talk to Elodie Harper–bestselling author of the Wolf Den and the House with the Golden Door–about enslaved people, freedwomen, and glamorous sex workers whose lives were far more precarious than they seemed.

Fresh Youtubery

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Online Talks and Conference-Related Things

Jobs, Postdocs, and other Professional Matters

Alia

Diversions

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the destruction of fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)