#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 22, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 28 Poseideon II in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Starting in 1801, the Seventh Earl of Elgin removed many classical Greek sculptures from Greece, particularly from the Parthenon and other monuments at the Acropolis in Athens. Pt. 1 covers the events leading up to the early removal efforts.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends prosperity, but there will be an abundance of mice and deer.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 21, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 27 Poseideon II in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

if it thunders today, it portends a plot against the king hated by many.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 20, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XIII Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 26 Poseideon II in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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No news for a Blue Monday!

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of imported goods, but an outbreak of coughing diseases will affect the people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Weekend Edition for January 19, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XIV Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 25 Poseideon II in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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We have finally arrived at the Battle of Salamis. There’s a lot of buildup before the battle, and surprisingly, this phase is where a lot of the important pieces were moved into place by the wily Themistocles. We witness scenes in both the Greek and Persian camps the day and night prior to the battle, but once the fleets have moved into position, we then witness the clashing ships and the mayhem of close-quarters battle. Queen Artemisia of Halicarnassus makes several appearances throughout, and we conclude with a picture of the battle’s aftermath and the resultant carnage.

Caligula’s absolute favourite thing in the world, apart from spending money, is screwing. And seriously, who can blame him. It’s good to be the king. And, like Ray, he was happy to be a power bottom. He liked horse racing, and was fond of poisoning other team’s horses and riders. He liked actors, and was fond of beating people up who interrupted performances in the theatre. I wish we could do that to people who write moronic iTunes reviews. And then, a few months after he became Emperor, Caligula fell seriously ill. It would be the turning point of his reign.

In this episode, Matt Crawford speaks with Professor and bestselling author Barry Strauss about his book Ten Caesars: Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine. For those who are obsessed with the Roman Empire or those who know nothing about it, this is the book to read. Strauss’s choice of Emperor’s from different eras really paints a broad and interesting picture of the empire and gives us an interesting perspective. I really found it hard to put this book down and now am even more interested in this topic than before. You could not make the stories in this book up, sex, murder, incest, intrigue, and love. A great, easy and enjoyable read!

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, when the king has a victory, the common people will be in a stronger position.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 17, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XVI Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 23 Poseideon II in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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The woman Olympias lived almost 2,400 years ago, around 373 BCE. Her legacy is one of controversy. For over two thousand years she has been represented as the vindictive, blood thirsty mother of Alexander the Great. But who was she really? What is the true story that unfolds when we peel away the layers of two millennia of propaganda? Was the most powerful woman in Greece, who believed she was descended from Achilles, really a monster? Or have we been missing the whole story? Come relive the epic life of Olympias and find out what happens when we breathe life back into the story of a woman that helped create an empire.

Book Reviews

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends non-fatal diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)