#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 8, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VIII id. Mai. 2774 AUC ~ 26 Mounichion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Hoplites were Greek people, most of which were citizens, who fought in battles as their city-states required. Dr Adam Schwartz, University of Copenhagen, joins the show to explain this military post in ancient Greek history.

For this episode I take a break from our narrative to bring you a collaboration that I had teamed up with Steve from Spartan History Podcast to record. We went into this conversation without any scripts and just a rough plan of what we wanted to cover. Steve’s series, Spartan History Podcast, takes a deep dive into the history of the Spartans, beginning back in Mythological times. He is currently in the stages of how the institutions and practices that would define the Spartans were developing. I would encourage everyone to check out his series as I am sure you will learn some elements about the Spartans that I bet you didn’t know about before. For this episode we begin by talking about ourselves and how we got into the podcasting world. We also look at what drew up towards Ancient Greek history. The conversation then evolved of many different tangents around Greek history, but we would come to focus on three many areas. I would look at the founding of Democracy in Athens with the early stages of its development. Steve then takes us for a closer look at Lycurgus and the question of if he was a historical figure. We then turn to the Greek and Persian War looking at who out of Athens and Sparta had been the most influential in their victory of Persia. The collaboration has been split over two parts, with this episode being part 1. Part two is hosted on Steve’s show over at Spartan History Podcast. Below are a number of links to help you find his show and his social media pages, though he is easily found on all good podcast platforms.

In an in-depth interview with expert archaeologist Tali Erickson-Gini, we hear that he who controls the spice (or garum and wine) controls the ancient world

In this second part of our two-part series on the origins & evolution of democracy in Classical Athens and its relationship to Athenian Citizenship, Katie & Cairo talk about the political life & legacy of Pericles in Athenian Democracy.

Joined by three fantastic first year students from UT Austin, we continue our discussion of Netflix’s miniseries as we get into episodes 4-6. We discuss how this show has updated the tale for this generation of viewers and how it compares to the 2004’s Troy. What characters work and don’t work for us? Do we want a good or a bad Hector? Are the gods necessary or superfluous? Is what this show needs just more blood? Also witness the exact moment when Colin realizes Aeneas was Dean Thomas in HP. Answers to these and many more await, along with repeated plugs for Shadow & Bone.

In our newest episode of the A.D. History Podcast, we witness the meteoric rise of the Sassanid Empire; a power that will make an indelible mark on the history of the world over the next four centuries. Furthermore, we look into the Roman emperor Elagabalus, a Roman emperor who wasn’t truly all that Roman at all…

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it is a bad omen for the common people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 7, 2021

Hodie est Non. Mai. 2774 AUC ~ 25 Mounichion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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  • [Ephemeris] FOEDVS ABEST De pactorum abruptione

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The Punic Wars was a series of three wars fought between two of the Mediterranean’s superpowers: Carthage and Rome; the result of which changed the balance of power in the region. Dr Kathryn Lomas, Durham University, joins the show to explain what happened in the First Punic War.

Synopsis:  Hattusili III’s diplomacy with the pharaoh Ramesses II culminates in the world’s first peace treaty.  After his death, his son Tudhaliya IV drives out the Ahhiyawans, then defends northern Syria against Assyrian aggression.

Murray answers this question from one of our patrons, Mythic Lore; ‘What is known / reasonably theorised about the formations and tactics used during the late bronze age (Mycenaeans, Hittites, Luwians – Trojan War, etc)?’

Nero likes hanging out under bridges where he could “take his pleasures more freely” and this leads to trouble for Sulla’s great-great-great grandson. But Nero also wants to abolish taxes because he’s a dirty commie. Then the Germans start some shit and find out why he was called “ONE CHANCE NERO”.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of birds and fish.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 6, 2021

Hodie est pr. Non. Mai. 2774 AUC ~ 24 Mounichion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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One of the funniest pieces of theatre set in Ancient Rome has to be A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962). Now there is a book about murder in Ancient Rome that matches the title inspiration for comedy as well. We sat down to talk to historian and author Dr Emma Southon about her new book A Fatal Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Dr Southon is also one of the hosts of the podcast History is Sexy and author of Agrippina: Empress, Exile, Hustler, Whore. We were excited to discover that not only does Emma share our affection for Julio-Claudian women, but she is a fellow murderino and lover of Drag Race at heart.

When the dust settled on a six month civil war in 238CE, only the 13 year old Gordian III is left standing to take the purple. Once again Rome is left with a teenage emperor. Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

It’s Niche. Very Niche… But how exactly did ancient Athens bury their soldiers? How did this change over time? And what huge implications could this difference mean both then… and now? This week’s Classical Wisdom Speaks is with Cezary Kucewicz, a National Science Centre Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of History, University of Gdansk, Poland, and Junior Research Fellow, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, UK. He is also the author of The Treatment of the War Dead in Archaic Athens. We discuss what exactly are the ancient war dead, how the custom changed dramatically between the archaic and classical periods of ancient Greece and what that change signifies…

A recent study proposes that the Biblical King Solomon orchestrated maritime trade across the Iron Age Mediterranean. Is there really evidence for this? And why didn’t the kingdoms of Israel and Judah create monumental art and architecture like their neighbors? Or, for that matter, write much stuff down? Our panelists are intrigued but not confident.

What happened to Episode 35 and Dr. Michael Fontaine? Well, our hosts had some tech diffs. That planned episode didn’t drop. It shattered. So instead Jeff and Dave go far off script and offer up a hastily-prepared, poorly-seasoned, half-baked, slightly rewarmed, partially-marinated impromptu side dish (or podcast upside down cake) that answers this burning question: why should I study Greek and Latin? Along the way, you learn about Cliff Clavin, Count Dooku, Eric Blair, J.K. Rowling, Dumbo’s Stables, and the secret life of appendectomists. There is also the rare serious moment where we compare ἔρις and ἐριθεία from Philippians 1 with Jerome’s translation contentio.

Occupied since around 3000 BC, the Ancient city of Corinth is not unique in its transition from a Pagan, Greco-Roman state to a Christian one. What makes it stand out, however, is the incredible evidence that allows us to track this city’s journey throughout this time period, in literature, architecture and art. In this episode, Dr. Amelia Brown outlines Corinth’s administration and its move towards Christianity. She also highlights the incredible evidence of Pausanias, a Greek travel writer and geographer of the second century AD who lived in the time of the Roman emperors. Amelia is a Senior Lecturer in Greek History & Language at the University of Queensland, Australia.

We know all about the battles of the Roman Empire: the opposing sides, their weapons and incentives. But if history is written by the winners, what happened if you lost? In this episode, Dr Jo Ball, battlefield archaeologist at the University of Liverpool, helps to fill in this gap. Jo takes us through the options of the victorious army; to release, kill or capture; and then discusses the treatment of those who fell into this last category. Listen as in this episode from our sibling podcast The Ancients Tristan and Jo explore the experiences of prisoners of war in Ancient Rome, how this might differ if those taken were also Roman, and how we know anything about them at all.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends that the crops will ripen too quickly and be ruined.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 5, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Non. Mai. 2774 AUC ~ 23 Mounichion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Mark Antony was an imminent figure in Rome’s transition to an empire; he was also famously a partner of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. Professor Richard Alston, Royal Holloway, University of London, is back on the show to discuss what’s known about his life.

Owen Rees and Giles Penman join us to discuss shades of the ancient world in Great War commemoration.

The current shifting season is the perfect backdrop for our first episode of the season:Greco-Roman Winemakers of the ancient world. Because – who doesn’t need a drink after the last decade *cough cough* We mean “year.” That said, people have had lots of reasons to wine (and whine) since – well – ever. And today, we have Dr. Emlyn Dodd, a Greco-Roman Archaeologist who’s gonna take us through the ancient, fascinating, and ever-timely traditions and technologies around wine cultivation, as practiced in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a difficult time in politics and wheat being more plentiful than barley. Vegetables, however, will be ruined.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 4, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Mai. 2774 AUC ~ 22 Mounichion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Hoc in colloquio Augustus et Iustus, Catharina absente, de bestiis domesticis sive familiaribus colloquuntur.

The third and fourth centuries in the Roman Empire were marked with perpetual internal conflict. Dr Adrastos Omissi, University of Glasgow, joins the show to explain.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends mild weather and plentiful crops.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)