#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 28, 2022

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 26 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

In the News

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Other Blog-like Publications

Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

In this first of a three-parter, Dave and Jeff set up a deep dive into a fascinating late work of Cicero in which representatives of the three major Hellenistic schools of thought (Epicurean, Stoic, and Academic) debate the nature and existence of the gods. Is their existence sure, doubtful, or impossible? And what is Cicero up to? Is he the Milli Vanilli of ancient philosophy, just lip-synching to Plato’s and Zeno’s greatest hits? Or is there some essential, original material here? What do we mean by “originality” in an ancient context? Sidle up to the buffet, and serve up a heapin’ helpin’ of ennui as Dave blows the thick dust off his dissertation…Cicero’s very reputation as a philosopher is at stake.

Where does the notion of ‘moral duty’ come from? In this conversation with Simon E. Drew we dive deep into the history of the concept and discuss my recent book The Invention of Duty.

Crucifixion was a Roman practise or torture and execution that proved a popular punishment for slaves and enemies of Rome When crucified an individual was nailed to a cross or a piece of wood and left in the elements to asphyxiate. Obvious content warning! Guest: Dr Gillian Shepherd (Director, Trendall Centre, La Trobe University)

In the bitter and bewildering struggle during the years after Cannae, Rome at last gained the upper hand. However, Hannibal would be afforded one last chance to turn the tide of the war. This was the arrival of his brother, Hasdrubal, with a great army of mercenaries in northern Italy in 207 BC. As the two brothers attempted to join forces, the Romans would execute an audacious plan to corner Hasdrubal by the banks of the Metaurus before he could unite with his elder brother….

Anthony Burton joins us to talk all about the history of a fabric synonymous with decadence.

Murray answers this question sent in from Micius. Do you think the “Grass Crown” was really a rare award or that it just wasn’t written about very often for whatever reason?

Now that we have witnessed the birth of the Delian League, in today’s episode we trace their exploits in the 470s BCE. The league does a good job landing more blows against the Persian Empire, but at the same time they begin to more strongly resemble an empire, and some league members are not amused. A new military leader named Cimon emerges to lead the Delian League. He suppresses some piracy, and his trireme fleet is overhauled to more better suit their campaign objectives. We consider all of this, and more, as the Delian League’s navy expands and then defeats a Persian fleet at the Battle of Eurymedon River.

Fresh Youtubery

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of sea fish but death for the flocks.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 27, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 25 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

In the News

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Other Blog-like Publications

Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

Tens of thousands of clay tablets containing texts written in the ancient Cuneiform script of the Assyrian Empire have been discovered, giving us invaluable insights into the inner workings of the Mesopotamian kingdom on the eve of its collapse in the 1st millennium BC. In this fascinating episode, Tristan chats with Professor Eleanor Robson of UCL to help shed light on the incredible history of scholarship in the ancient Near East.

We are thrilled to bring you an exploration of the relationship between the ancient world and metal music. We’re joined by Dr Jeremy J. Swist an expert in the subject. Dr Swist is a lecturer in the Department of Classical Studies at Brandeis University. He holds a PhD in Classics looking at the Reception of the seven kings of Rome in imperial historiography from Tiberius to Theodosius. His research covers everything from historiography to the classical reception in metal music.

She’s the Tenth Muse, Western literature’s first lyric poet, and a woman who openly, unabashedly loved women and wrote about it–in an extremely patriarchal society where queer women’s experiences were almost universally erased. But what has come down to us about the life and times of Sappho? Like her poetry, our picture of Sappho’s life is very fragmentary. This week, we team up with Leesa Charlotte from Sweetbitter to try piecing the puzzle together.

Fresh Youtubery

Book Reviews

Exhibition Related Things

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the outbreak of harmless diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 26, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 24 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Fresh Bloggery

Other Blog-like Publications

Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

Fellow history podcaster Tristan Hughes (The Ancients Podcast) joins the show to discuss his new book, “Alexander’s Successors at War: The Perdiccas Years, 323-320 BC”, which covers the first tumultuous years of the Wars of the Successors. Though framed around the career of Perdiccas, the standing regent of Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, the book itself dedicates to covering the wide-reaching events that gripped Europe and Asia as the Argead Empire began to struggle in its first death throes.

The opening battle of the Second Punic War was to set the trend in many ways and anticipate much of what was to come. But how did it come about? Who were the figures involved, how did the conditions come into play and what exactly happened?

Jen Campbell Interviews Jean Menzies (That’s Ancient History host) about her debut children’s book Greek Myths, published by DK and illustrated by Katie Ponder.

Fresh Youtubery

Book Reviews

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends many being put down by a man in power, but in the end he will have his downfall.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 25, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 23 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Association/Departmental Blogs and News

Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

Rhetoric is supposed to inspire. Imagine Cicero exhorting the Roman people, Churchill vowing to “fight on the beaches.” Yet, when politicians speak today, it’s almost always boring or obnoxious. Why? Prof. Rob Goodman, author of Words on Fire: Eloquence and its Conditions comes by today to talk about the history of rhetoric, what Cicero knew that we don’t, and the political speech styles of Trudeau (boring), Trump (obnoxious), and X González (pretty great, actually).

Just because Plato’s Atlantis was never intended to convey history doesn’t meant it didn’t have some historical inspiration in the form of a Bronze Age natural disaster… Plus: how did Atlantis become what it is today and where do these dangerous ideas come from? This episode was written and recorded before the eruption of the volcano in Tonga in January of 2022 which is why the tragedy and those affected were not mentioned.

Fresh Youtubery

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends unrest among the enslaved ones.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for January 24, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Feb. 2775 AUC ~ 22 Gamelion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Association/Departmental Blogs and News

Other Blog-like Publications

Fresh Podcasts

When one of the praetorian prefects joins the conspirators, they decide it’s time to act. But they can’t agree on a plan. It takes a woman to move things along.

Another Latin lesson for beginners. Let’s talk about Latin verbs (again)…

In this second part of Tristan’s explainer, he takes us right into the heart of the battle dubbed the Persian Thermopylae. Listen as Alexander begins a full-blooded assault on the Persian Gates, and find out how this battle for the Persian heartlands ended.

We’re back for the big one (because it sold us queer giraffes!). A critical and commercial hit, Gladiator spawned a revival for a genre that had been presumed dead for at least 40 years. It also inspired, for better or worse, no small amount in interest in ancient Rome over the last two decades. We get into all the details of this movie, its legacy and the impact its vision of Rome had on 21st audiences. Plus, we share our hopes and dreams for upcoming, albeit unnecessary, Gladiator 2.

Charlotte is joined by Dr Eleri Cousins to dig deep into the religious side of the ancient Romans.

This week we catch up with brilliant Natalie Haynes. We find out how comedy has shaped her career in classics and how the classics have shaped her career in comedy. Full of laughs and insight, we learn what it takes to a have a successful Radio 4 comedy series, write columns in leading papers and have your novel short listed for the Women’s Prize for Fiction. Natalie is a classicist, author and stand-up comedian as well as the host of Radio 4’s “Natalie Haynes Stands Up For the Classics” which is also available as a podcast. Natalie’s books include A Thousand Ships and Pandora’ Jar and have featured on numerous best seller lists.

Fresh Youtubery

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends diseases following shortages.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)