#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of March 28-29, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 6 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Synopsis: With Rome encroaching from the north and south, the sons of Grypus battle Parthians, usurpers and local powers to keep their hold on Syria…

In this CC Shorts episode, Elton talks to Dr Jody Cundy (University of Toronto) about her work on Pausanias’ Description of Greece. The conversation ranges over the themes of wonder, travel writing, and paradoxography (‘the cataloguing of marvels’), and how Pausanias represents Greece as a place of enchantment – from its most famous ruins to a simple rock on the ground.

Something a little lighter to cheer everyone up this month – in this story, a young man throws a wild party, not realising his father has come home from a foreign business trip early, and a clever slave comes up with a novel idea for keeping the father out of the house… We’re all going through a rough time at the minute, one way or another, so rather than something scary or sad, I’ve gone for a bit of comic relief with this one! This story has been adapted from Plautus, Mostellaria, 446-531.

This episode of Tony Robinson’s Romans looks into the life of the infamously mad and ‘evil’ Emperor Caligula. We’ll be exploring his rise to power, the many attempts on his life and his most famous decision to make his horse a member of the senate. Historians Anthony Barrett and Andrew Wallace-Hadrill join Tony to explore the mind of Caligula.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a better reputation for women.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 27, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 4 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

… the news cycle seems to be grinding to a halt …

Classicists and Classics in the News

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends imported abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 26, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 3 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Many historians claim that Caligula’s demand to be treated as a living god is a sure sign of madness. And yet – JESUS claimed the same thing and nobody calls HIM insane. Why does he get special treatment? On this episode, we drill down into the evidence for the claim about Caligula.

Book Reviews

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the acquisition of foreign slaves.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 25, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 2 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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… slow news day on the Classics front …

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Severus Alexander was an emperor who spent much of his reign at war, but he was ill-suited to it and would likely have preferred to be elsewhere. His main enemy was the Sasanians, an empire that rose out of the ashes of the Parthians, and would be a leading regional power for the next 400 years. Guest: Dr Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

On this episode of the podcast, Rafael Castro, an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues explain why some of the weather and atmospheric effects recorded in ancient Roman poetry seem to describe symptoms of a large volcanic eruption, an environmental disaster that likely exacerbated the impacts of war and contributed to widespread starvation. They think the mysterious eruption is consistent with an event at Mount Etna, a famous volcano in the Roman province of Sicilia (now Sicily), in February of 44 BCE.

Today we’re going to move from the early 4th century into the early 5th century, from the end of Constantine’s reign to the devolution of Roman authority in Gaul. From Constantine’s death to the fall of the Western Roman Empire the Franks and Romans were involved in a long process where the former replaced the latter, as a people and as leaders, as Gaul transformed into the new Francia…

The biggest battle of the war so far has the gods themselves being drawn into the war, fighting over the fate of the sacred city of Troy

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the beginning of new business among the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 24, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 1 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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As the world endures a pandemic, we look to a plague of the past: that which struck Athens early in the Peloponnesian War. And we do so with the aid of Neville Morley, professor of classics and ancient history at the University of Exeter. Where did the plague come from? How did it affect the war? How did it change Athenian society? We explore these questions and more in a fascinating extended conversation. Neville is the perfect guide for these matters, having written many books and articles on different aspects of ancient history and its modern influence, including Roman imperialism, ancient trade, and the ancient Greek historian Thucydides.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends prosperity.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)