#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for November 12, 2019

Hodie est  pridie Id. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 16 Maimakterion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

Tres amici de certamine quodam athletico et de fabulis fingendis colloquuntur

In the second half, Richard discusses his work on Roman coinage and how the desire to keep correcting himself propelled his work forward, his influence on those who have gone on to be prominent scholars in their own right (and why he’s happy none of them are ‘Reecian’ in style), deciding to write a book on the archaeology of the Later Roman Empire, and his thoughts on the current state of archaeology.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a period of insomnia for men.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for November 11, 2019

Hodie est  a.d. III Id. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 15 Maimakterion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

… another slow Monday

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

This is the seventh episode in a series where I converse with Classicists (and now Assyriologists) about either books or articles that they have published, their current research interests, or just unique classes and topics that they are teaching and exploring further. 

In today’s special guest episode, I am joined by Dr Moudhy Al-Rashid, Post-Doc at Wolfson College, University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom. Her current research focuses on the use of metaphor in descriptions of mental distress in cuneiform medical texts, and she teaches classes on the Akkadian language and the history of science and medicine in ancient Mesopotamia.

With the death of Ptolemy I Soter, the Hellenistic World would be subject to a collection of his formidable children: Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Arsinoe II, Magas, and Ptolemy Ceraunus. We also spend considerable time discussing the incestuous royal sibling marriages that would become standard policy of the Ptolemaic Dynasty.

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, men will give thanks to the gods because an easterly wind will blow.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Weekend Edition for November 10, 2019

Hodie est  a.d. IV Id. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 14 Maimakterion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It 

Classics and Classicists in the News

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Landscape Modery

Conference playlist (I think they’ll play in order):

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an end to the evil plans of the powerful; a drying wind will damage trees.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Papyrus Thefts: Currently Missing from the Sorbonne

As allegations about Dirk Obbink are causing reactions throughout academe for the past while (I do have a blog post in progress on this; stay tuned), and especially in light of Eidolon’s recent issue devoted to papyrus thefts, it seems timely to bring up a conversation I’ve been having over the past couple of weeks. Prof Jean Gascou contacted me because I had mentioned a fragment of Euripides’ ‘Phoenician Women’  in conjunction with items which were being displayed frequently by Scott Carroll. Prof Gascou was wondering whether it might be a fragment of the Phoinissae that had gone missing from the Sorbonne’s collection sometime between 1965 (the last time the papyrus was seen ) and 1986 (when Prof Alain Blanchard discovered it was missing). Over the course of the conversation, Dr Gascou revealed that a number of papyri were missing from the Sorbonne’s collection and with the permission of the current directrice de l’Institut de papyrologie de Sorbonne Université (Hélène Cuvigny) here is a list of those items, with some identifying details:

  • Inv.Sorb. 385 (Magdôla) = Peut-être littéraire (mention de Chrysippos) – perte constatée en 1976
  • Inv.Sorb. 510 (Ghôran) = fr. peut-être littéraires – perte constatée en 1980
  • Inv.Sorb. 2151 (Reinach) = formulaire magique – perte constatée en 1991
  • Inv.Sorb. 2172 (Reinach) = Hexamètres astronomiques ou astrologiques (perdu, mais nous conservons toujours une copie de Papathomopoulos) – perte constatée en 1991
  • Inv.Sorb. 2177 (Reinach) = littéraire (historique ?) – perte constatée en 1991
  • Inv.Sorb. 2179 (Reinach) = littéraire (biblique ?) – perte constatée en 1991
  • Inv.Sorb. 2280 (de La Haye – Nahmann) = fr. sûrement littéraire – perte constatée par moi-même (11/2012)
  • Inv.Sorb. 2289 (Reinach) = mot carré – perte constatée en 1991
  • Inv.Sorb. 2295 (Ghôran) = Homère, Iliade, XVIII, ca. 450 – perte constatée en 1989
  • Inv.Sorb. 2347 (Ghôran) = Euripide, Phénicienne, v. 31 sqq. – perte constatée en 1986

Perhaps someone out there has come across one or more of these items? Perhaps other collections want to publicize what is missing from their collections?

 

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for November 8, 2019

Hodie est  a.d. VI Id. Nov. 2772 AUC ~ 12 Maimakterion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

The team are back to discuss Ancient Warfare Magazine XIII.3 The Rise of Septimius Severus.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an outbreak of gluttony stemming from horrible diseases.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)