#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 12, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IV Non. Sept. 2775 AUC ~ 7 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympiad

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In 464 BC, Poseidon the earth shaker would rock the Peloponnese, seeing Sparta take the full force of the earthquake. A number of the ancient sources would record the terrible event and the scale of destruction and suffering experienced by the Spartans. Modern day studies would show that the what Sparta experienced was likely on the same scale as the earth quake that struck Haiti in 2021 of our time. The impact to Sparta was great enough that their Helot class would view their masters as vulnerable. Areas would arrange themselves in a rebellion and revolt would breakout through the region of Messenia. The revolt would be organised on a scale that would see Sparta look to its allies in the Peloponnesian and Hellenic league for assistance…

Patron of the podcast Micius Porcius sent us this question for Murray to answer. During the imperial period, did consuls continue leading armies in war as they had in the Republican period or were legions only led by generals assigned by the Emperor?

Turns out epiphanies are super fascinating and, basically, everywhere. Gillian Glass joins Liv to talk about epiphanic experiences in antiquity, both Greek mythology and in the Torah. Plus, what do the gods smell like, anyway? Follow Gillian on Twitter.

On this episode, we’re joined by special guest Dr. Victoria Austen to discuss 1997 film Hercules. We talk trends in feminism, the Christianization of myth, and the cult of Elon Musk.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends discord among the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 1, 2022

Hodie est Kal. Sept. 2775 AUC ~ 6 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Prosthetics – an artificial feature or body part commonly used to either help restore functions of lost limbs, or change a person’s appearance. Today, advancements in technology mean prosthetics can sense touch and be controlled by the mind – a far cry from their origins in antiquity as ivory embellished arms or hair extensions made out of plant fibres. In this episode, Tristan is joined by Dr Jane Draycott from University of Glasgow to talk about the brilliant uses of prosthetics in ancient societies, where the concept originated from, and how sources like Pliny the Elder and excavated wigs can tell us how their functions have changed across millennia.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a good harvest and good times.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 31, 2022

Hodie est pr. Kal. Sept. 2775 AUC ~ 5 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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This week Jeff and Dave take a sustained look at an-oft discussed but ill-defined notion: what, if anything, gives people dignity? Drawing on the work of famous, late scholar Charles Trinkaus (The Scope of Renaissance Humanism), the guys trace this notion from Cicero through the Greek and Latin fathers and into the trecento. Thanks to the diligent spadery of Chuck T., you’ll enjoy a who’s who of what’s what when it comes to key themes and ideas surrounding what separates man (and woman) from animal, the noble brute. In the end it all comes down to Petrarch, Ficino, Mirandola, and Peter ‘Et’ Cetera of Chicago fame. The jinx here may be lower than normal, but the substance is swole. Don’t miss it!

Fulvia came from a Roman noble family and is strongly associated with a string of influential husbands, most notably Mark Antony. She was influential and powerful in her own way, and would go on to play an important role in the Perusine War against Octavian. Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University).

In Ancient Greece, the incredible athlete known as Theagenes of Thasos was so successful, his legend of being unbeaten followed him into the afterlife. But is it true that even his depiction in a bronze statue fought his battles? In this episode, we talk about the Ancient Greek legend of Theagenes and then play the Quick Quiz with Mindreader, Eric Dittelman!

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

No entry for today …

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 30, 2022

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Sept. 2775 AUC ~ 4 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Nero’s first attempt at building a single property that covered his estates on the Palatine Hill and the Esquiline Hill was The Domus Transitoria, the House of Passage. It burned down in the Great Fire. He replaced it with the Domus Aurea (Golden House), designed by expert engineers Severus and Celer, and it was so revolutionary that it appears to be the stuff of genius.

What on Gaia’s earth is the Orphic tradition? Liv attempts to break down this mysterious tradition that may or may not have been more of an ancient religion. And it all revolves around that famous Thracian singer, Orpheus.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends disease in the city where the thunder rumbled.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 29, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Sept. 2775 AUC ~ 3 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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DOTRR’s review of HBO’s Rome’s seventh episode, “Pharsalus.”  Friends and I summarize the episode, speculate about the show, and take a quiz on historical accuracy!

The story of the Trojan War – featuring the daring Achilles, beautiful Helen and one very deceptive horse – is a classic of western literature. But did this famous war ever really happen? And was Troy even a real place? On today’s ‘Everything you wanted to know’ episode, Professor Paul Cartledge answers listener questions on these ancient mysteries. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he discusses the discovery of archaeological remains believed to be Troy, and why Homer’s Iliad may not be the most reliable historical source.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a good harvest.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)