#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 18, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XV Kal. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 20 Hekatombion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Listen to the Genesis from the Vulgate Bible read in Latin. Genesis ex Biblia Sacra Vulgata Latine recitata. This is part of “Lectiones aestivae”, the summer series where I read passages of Latin texts from all ages.

Despite being one of the first civilisations in human history, Sumer is not as well-known as other Bronze Age societies such as Babylonia and, of course, Ancient Egypt. Recent research indicates that the first ever writing system emerged in the Sumerian heartland of southern Mesopotamia around 3500 BC. So who were these Near Eastern pioneers forming some of the first urban settlements along the Tigris and Euphrates rivers? In this episode, Tristan is joined by Dr Paul Collins from the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, to help unravel the mysteries of the Sumerians and their trailblazing civilisation.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of crops due to excessive rain.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 16, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XVII Kal. Sex. 2775 AUC ~ 18 Hekatombion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends the king in the East being overcome by war and dry, hot weather will lead to an outbreak of disease 

[Sunday] If it thunders today it portends the succession of a great ruler

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 15, 2022

Hodie est Id. Jul. 2775 AUC ~ 17 Hekatombion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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In the Season 12 Finale, we are exploring the Library of Ashurbanipal

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Caroline Boggis-Rolfe joins us to talk about 2,000 years of colourful history that tell the story of the Adriatic Sea.

Liv reads Ovid’s Heroides, the letters from Penelope to Ulysses (Odysseus) and Dido to Aeneas, translated by Grant Showerman. Penelope questions where on Gaia’s green earth her husband Ulysses has been all this time, and Dido calls Aeneas out for being such an absolute dweeb.

Death of the Roman Republic is reviewing the 2005 HBO Original Series, Rome! My friends, BP, Cole, and Jacob, are joining me to review the series, all of whom will bring a unique insight. This is a little preview of what the new series/season will be, still on this DOTRR feed!

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Homer’s The Iliad is still considered a literary classic. This hour, we look at some of the many ways the epic applies to life today, from our understanding of plague, death, politics, and anger. We’ll discuss the value of returning to the story over and over again, and learn about how it can be used as a framework for other stories. GUESTS: Emily Katz Anhalt:Professor of Classical Languages and Literature at Sarah Lawrence College, she is the author of Embattled: How Ancient Greek Myths Empower Us To Resist Tyranny and Enraged: Why Violent Times Need Ancient Greek Myths Joel Christensen: Professor of Classical Studies and Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at Brandeis University, he is author ofThe Many-Minded Man: ‘The Odyssey,’ Psychology, and the Therapy of Epic Maya Deane: Author of Wrath Goddess Sing

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends dissension among the common people and a shortage of grain.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 14, 2022

Hodie est pr. Id. Jul. 2775 AUC ~ 16 Hekatombion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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Famed across the ages and around the world – everyone knows the name Cleopatra. But how did she become one of the most infamous women in history? Born in 69BCE, a member of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Hellenistic Egypt, Cleopatra VII lived a tumultuous life. Within two turbulent decades of taking the throne of Egypt, Cleopatra had emerged the victor of a brutal civil war. She won the hearts of two of Rome’s most powerful men, and successfully restored a golden age for her kingdom – she was a force few dared to reckon with. In this episode, Tristan is joined by Professor Joyce Tyldesley, Dr Chris Naunton, and Dr Glenn Godenho, to discuss the rise of Cleopatra.

After a peaceful year in 441 BCE, the Romans are in for nasty shock over the course of 440 and 439 BCE. It all begins with a crippling famine, and there seems to have been signs of problems ahead before the food shortage really set in. In Pliny the Elder, there is a reference to an aedile of the plebs (Marcus Marcius) selling grain to the poor at a very low price….

The werewolf myth as we know it today generally involves getting bitten by a werewolf, transforming during the full moon, and being very susceptible to silver bullets. But werewolves in ancient Greece and Rome were a little different. Join us for a spooky-season deep dive into ancient werewolf mythology from thousands of years ago. We’ll take a look at the pre-Christian origins of the werewolf myth and its connections to death, starvation, cannibalism, and transformation.

In episode six of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, Professor Robin Fleming speaks to David Musgrove about how far the archaeological evidence and the documentary sources agree – or disagree – about what happened as Britain moved away from the influence of the Roman empire.

With enemies to confront in every direction, Valerian heads back to the east where Shapur and the Parthians are once again threatening the borders of the Roman empire. While Valerian anticipates a victory, what is to come is the greatest defeat of a Roman emperor. Episode III of ‘Valerian’. Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Head of the Centre for Classical Studies at the Australian National University).

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends one man coming into power over many who will be most unjust in state affairs.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 13, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IV Id. Jul. 2775 AUC ~ 14 Hekatombion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

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We have a very fun conversation with Dr. Natalie Swain about her work on classical reception and the polar regions — the Arctic and Antarctic — science fiction, and comics. And Natalie and Mark find lots of overlaps and connections between their interests!

The underground cult site at Başbük in southeastern Turkey has us wondering, why depict Aramean deities in an Assyrian style? Is this an Iron Age cult site or a rich guy’s rec room? Or is it both? Mukīn-abūa of Tušhan, you sly dog.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the appearance of venomous reptiles.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)