CONF: Defining Citizenship in Archaic Greece

Defining citizenship in archaic Greece

Thursday 7th May 2009

10.00 – 11.00: Registration in the Department of Classics
(1st Floor, Parkinson Building, University of Leeds)

11.00 onwards: Papers in the Beechgrove Room, University House

11.00 – 11.15: Introduction: Alain Duplouy (Paris)

11.15 – 11.45: John Davies (Liverpool) ‘The emergence and consolidation of the polis- state’.
11.45 – 12.15: Josine Blok (Utrecht) ‘Retracing steps: finding ways into archaic Greek citizenship.’
12.15 – 12.45: Discussion

12.45 – 14.00: Lunch

14.00 – 14.30: Paulin Ismard (Paris) ‘Archaic Associations and Citizenship in Athens.’
14.30 – 15.00: James Whitley (Cardiff) ‘Citizenship and commensality in Archaic Crete: Searching for the Andreion.’
15.00 – 15.30: Discussion

15.30 – 16.00: Tea

16.00 – 16.30: Paul Cartledge (Cambridge) ‘The Spartan contribution to Greek citizenship theory.’
16.30 – 17.00: Alain Duplouy (Paris) ‘Mass and elite: Civic versus aristocratic strategies?’
17.00 – 18.00: Discussion

The colloquium is open to all academic participants; postgraduate and undergraduate students are especially welcome. The conference fee, which includes tea/coffee and a buffet lunch, is £10, payable on the day. Directions to the University of Leeds and campus maps may be found at the following address: For any queries, please contact Roger Brock (r.w.brock AT; 0113 343 6785).

This Day in Ancient History

ante diem iii kalendas maias

  • ludi Florales … a.k.a. Floralia (day 3) — a festival originally ordered in response to an interpretation of the Sybilline books in 238 B.C., it fell into desuetude only to be revived in 173 B.C.; it was a general festival of drinking and other merriment in honour of Flora, who presided over (of course) flowers and their blossoms

CONF: Lampeter Seminars


With the exception of KYKNOS papers which start at 6.00pm (, all papers start at 5.00pm. All seminars are held in the Roderick Bowen Research Centre. For more information please contact Mirjam Plantinga (m.plantinga AT or Owen Hodkinson (o.hodkinson AT All very welcome.

Thursday 23 April: Dr. Tina Chronopoulos (KCL), ‘A reading of an Horatian Ode with a 12th-cent. medieval Latin commentary in hand’, 5.00pm.

Thursday 30 April: Dr. Angelo Giavatto (Cologne), ‘How to write to yourself: structure and argumentation in the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius’, 5.00pm.

Thursday 7 May: Dr. Lindsay Allen (KCL), ‘At home in Persepolis’, 5.00pm.

Thursday 14 May (KYKNOS paper): Nora Goldschmidt (Magdalen College, Oxford), ‘Virgil, Ennius, and the Site of Rome’, 6.00pm.

Thursday 28 May (KYKNOS paper): Dr. Johanna Akkurjarvi (Lund), ‘Narrating Athens. Genres in Pausanias’ Attika’, 6.00pm.

Thursday 4 June (KYKNOS paper): Dr. Koen de Temmerman (Ghent), ‘Less than ideal paradigms in the ancient Greek novel’, 6.00pm.

CONF: Communities and Networks in the Ancient Greek World

6-9 JULY 2009

Organisers: Dr Claire Taylor, Trinity College Dublin
Dr Kostas Vlassopoulos, University of Nottingham

This conference will examine the networks of interaction within and between
different groups in the classical and early hellenistic periods. Questions for
exploration include:
• What constituted a ‘community’ within the Greek world?
• What networks did people create, belong to, and destroy?
• How were different groups of people interconnected, and how did they
negotiate the ‘boundaries’ between them?
• How did communities change in response to social, political, economic
• How can we use network theory to access the lives and activities of people
for whom little traditional evidence survives?

Paulin Ismard (Université Paris Est Marne la Vallée; Equipe Phéacie): Networks
of communities in classical and hellenistic Athens: cultural aspects.
Claire Taylor (Trinity College, Dublin): Social networks and social hierarchies:
towards a model of social mobility in Athens.
Ben Gray (All Souls, Oxford): Exile communities and the citizen ideal in the
later classical and hellenistic Greek world.
Kostas Vlassopoulos (University of Nottingham): Free spaces: contexts of
interaction between citizens, metics and slaves in classical Athens.
Ben Akrigg (University of Toronto): The metic population in Athens.
Peter Hunt (University of Colorado, Boulder): Ethnic identity among slaves at
Barbara Kowalzig (Royal Holloway, London): Trading gods and trading networks:
economies of trust in ancient Greece.
Vincent Gabrielsen (University of Copenhagen): Naval and grain networks at
Christy Constantakopoulou (Birkbeck, London): Beyond the polis: island koina and
other non-polis entities in the Aegean.
Esther Eidinow (Newman College, Birmingham): Networks, narrative and
negotiation: magical practices and polis religion.

If you would like to attend, or require further information, please contact Dr
Claire Taylor (, Dr Kostas Vlassopoulos
(konstantinos.vlassopoulos AT, or see the website:

Graduate student bursaries are available to cover the cost of campus
accommodation: please contact Dr Claire Taylor (claire.taylor AT if you
wish to apply, or download the form from the website:

CONF: The End of Ancient Empires


University of Edinburgh, 19-21 June 2009

The Classical Association of Scotland (founded 1902) is proud to present its first annual conference in a new format. Papers will be 20 minutes long, and will be followed by 10 minutes of discussion. All sessions will take place in the Archaeology Lecture Theatre, School of History, Classics, and Archaeology, High School Yards, Infirmary Street, Edinburgh.

Full programme, abstracts, directions, and booking forms for registration and accommodation are available at:

Please address booking enquiries to Dr Gavin Kelly (Gavin.Kelly AT and all other enquires to Dr Costas Panayotakis (C.Panayotakis AT

Outline programme:

Keynote address: Professor T. D. Barnes (Toronto/Edinburgh).

Confirmed speakers:

G. Longley (Oxford), The Causes of Imperial Decline in Ancient Authors from Herodotus to Polybius.

C. A. Farrell (KCL), The Afterbirth of the Seleucid Empire? Re-examining Imperial Ideology and Stateless Monarchs

E. Almagor (Jerusalem), The Decline and Fall of the Persian Empire in Plutarch’s Writings

A. Nagel/R. Sheikoleslamy (Ann Arbor/Tehran), Eternal Flames or The End of Antiquity’s Largest Empire – New Evidence from the Hall of Hundred Columns in Persepolis, Iran

L. Gregoratti (Udine), Vologeses’ “New Deal” and the transformation of the Parthian Empire

A. Collar (Exeter/Ankara), Understanding Fracture in the Roman Empire through Cult: Jupiter Dolichenus and the Power – and Fragility– of Military Networks

K. Petrovicová/J. Bednarikova (Brno), Martianus Capella’s questionable relation to the Vandals

G. Kelly (Edinburgh), tba

H. Ziche (Antilles and Guyane), Decoupling Economic and Institutional Development in the Fifth-century Roman Empire

F. Haarer (KCL), Cities in Transition: Change and Continuity in the Late Roman World

M. S. Bjornlie (Claremont McKenna), Assessing Decline and Fall in Ostrogothic Italy: The Fiscal Profile from Cassiodorus’ Variae

P. Wynn, Where are the Barbarians? Reframing the ‘Enemy’ after the Empire’s Fall in the Vita Germani

A. Roberts (KCL), George Grote, the Destruction of Ancient Empires, and British imperialism

R. Bryant Davies (Cambridge), Marius amidst the Ruins of Carthage: a Nineteenth-Century Understanding of Empire

D. Engels (Brussels), “Ist nicht mit Actium und der pax Romana die antike Geschichte zu Ende?” Oswald Spengler on the Transformation and Fall of the Roman Empire.