#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 31, 2020

Hodie est pridie III Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 7 Gamelion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

no entry for today …

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 30, 2020

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 6 Gamelion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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In this month’s episode we talk to Professor David Langslow about the origins of language, in particular of Indo-European languages. We discuss their development, the diversification and also the role which Latin has played and continues to play in the modern world.

Today’s episode covers how the removal of Ancient Greek artifacts from Greece by Lord Elgin played out, how these sculptures became part of the collection of the British Museum, and why the controversy over all this has continued until today.

Statius’ Thebaid, Books 7-12. Six hundred years after Aeschylus, Statius once again brought the Theban epic to a thunderous conclusion.

Book Reviews

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends death everywhere.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 29, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IV Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 5 Gamelion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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The Romans had some strange ideas when it came to medical practice, but you have to give them some leeway, and a lot has changed in 2000 years. Some of the thoughts and techniques showed forward thinking, but you might have to ignore the cabbages. Guest: Dr Leanne McNamara (Classics and Ancient History, La Trobe University)

In this month’s episode we talk to Professor David Langslow about the origins of language, in particular of Indo-European languages. We discuss their development, the diversification and also the role which Latin has played and continues to play in the modern world.

John J. Miller is joined by Daisy Dunn to discuss Pliny the Elder’s Natural History.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an oppressive air and disease for all.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 28, 2020

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 4 Gamelion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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In this episode, two friends on a long journey argue over whether or not they should spend the night at a rather grim and unpleasant taverna… This Greco-Roman folktale was ‘very well known’ according to Cicero, and features some familiar tropes, including dreams, vengeance and danger on the road; the story has been adapted from Cicero, On Divination, 1.57 and Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds and Sayings, 1.7.ext.10

When Caligula’s favorite sister, Drusilla, suddenly died in 38 CE, he couldn’t cope. He made her a god, to be worshipped as Panthea, the “All-Goddess,” or “all-embracing deity”, Divae Drusillae Sorori Caius Augusti Germanici. One senator declared under oath that he had witnessed how Drusilla rose to heaven. And now Caligula needed to find a new successor.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends plenty of fish in the sea, but death for the flocks.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for January 27, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Feb. 2772 AUC ~ 3 Gamelion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Continuing my examination of the Roman kings I talk about Tullus Hostilius, the third Roman king. Tulls was primarily associated with Rome’s military exploits and had a hand in a famous myth. He also had more than a hand in a death which shocked even Livy. From war to religious problems and a bizarre death. It’s all here.

By 272 B.C., the throne of Macedon now lay firmly in the hands of Antigonus II Gonatas. As a “philosoper-king”, the court of Pella would play host to a great amount of intellectual celebrities of the early Hellenistic period, and peace would return Macedon to a state of prosperity. The situation would be different in Greece, as stirrings of rebellion would break out, first during the Chremonidean War, and later due to the rise of Aratus of Sicyon and the Achaean League.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the outbreak of illnesses.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)