#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 25, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 2 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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… slow news day on the Classics front …

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Severus Alexander was an emperor who spent much of his reign at war, but he was ill-suited to it and would likely have preferred to be elsewhere. His main enemy was the Sasanians, an empire that rose out of the ashes of the Parthians, and would be a leading regional power for the next 400 years. Guest: Dr Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

On this episode of the podcast, Rafael Castro, an undergraduate at the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues explain why some of the weather and atmospheric effects recorded in ancient Roman poetry seem to describe symptoms of a large volcanic eruption, an environmental disaster that likely exacerbated the impacts of war and contributed to widespread starvation. They think the mysterious eruption is consistent with an event at Mount Etna, a famous volcano in the Roman province of Sicilia (now Sicily), in February of 44 BCE.

Today we’re going to move from the early 4th century into the early 5th century, from the end of Constantine’s reign to the devolution of Roman authority in Gaul. From Constantine’s death to the fall of the Western Roman Empire the Franks and Romans were involved in a long process where the former replaced the latter, as a people and as leaders, as Gaul transformed into the new Francia…

The biggest battle of the war so far has the gods themselves being drawn into the war, fighting over the fate of the sacred city of Troy

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the beginning of new business among the common folk.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 24, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 1 Elaphebolion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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As the world endures a pandemic, we look to a plague of the past: that which struck Athens early in the Peloponnesian War. And we do so with the aid of Neville Morley, professor of classics and ancient history at the University of Exeter. Where did the plague come from? How did it affect the war? How did it change Athenian society? We explore these questions and more in a fascinating extended conversation. Neville is the perfect guide for these matters, having written many books and articles on different aspects of ancient history and its modern influence, including Roman imperialism, ancient trade, and the ancient Greek historian Thucydides.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends prosperity.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Videos: The Funeral Oration and Nicole Loraux: 19 February 2020: A Study Day at Le Collegium de Lyon (France)

Notice of this appeared in my email (via David Pritchard) and near as I can tell, it is not easily shareable right now even though it is probably very appropriate for the times.  Descriptions are clipped from their pages:

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for March 23, 2020

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 29 Anthesterion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Ego et Martinus in hypogaio machinam spectamus vestimenta lavantem.

Tres amici de condicionibus vivendi nunc sequendis loquuntur, necnon de seriebus televisificis quas his diebus spectant

In the first episode of Timeline Tapes, we’re presenting Tony Robinson’s Romans: Caesar Pt 1 as he takes us through the first part of the life of Julius Caesar. He is joined by historians and Rome academics Ray Laurence and Andrew Wallace Hadrill who are able to provide more insight into one of the most powerful men in history.

In this episode, Tony continues the story of Julius Caesar as he completes his conquest of Gaul and heads back to civil war in Rome, to Alexandria and the arms of Cleopatra, and eventually to his doom at the hands of his people. To tell the story of the fall of Caesar, Tony is joined by historians Chris Pelling and Andrew Wallace Hadrill.

I, Podius ain’t your daddy’s I, Claudius-based podcast! On Episode 6 of I, Podius, hosts John Hodgman and Elliott Kalan welcome Sir Patrick Stewart to the show!

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends discord.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of March 21-22, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Apr. 2772 AUC ~ 28 Anthesterion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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NT Pod 89, “How was the Forgery of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife Proved?”, is the third of four podcasts on the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife. It is just over eighteen minutes long. NT Pod 89: How was the Forgery of the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife Proved?

In this episode, we discuss the year 413 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the rise of Archelaus to the Macedonian throne, the Athenian attack on the Laconian coastline which technically broke the peace treaty, the defeats by the Athenian army and navy at Syracuse, and the retreat and ultimate surrender of the Athenians, which brought the Sicilian Expedition to an end.

Tres amici de pestilentia late divulgata loquuntur.

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the destruction of birds but an abundance of daily needs.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)