#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 26, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Sept. 2772 AUC ~ 8 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

‘Classicists and Classics in the News

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

Throughout her professional and scholastic careers, Allyson Mitchell has focused on how technology can act as a bridge to connect formal and informal educational spaces and programs. Prior to joining the Penn Museum, Mitchell served as the Curator of Education at the Delaware History Museum, where she created a new Distance Learning studio and supporting programs…

From the 6th century BCE, philosophy was used to make sense of the world – including astronomy, mathematics, politics, ethics, metaphysics and aesthetics. But why did philosophy flourish in Greek culture? How were the great philosophers received in their own time? And how did it influence Islam, communism and even the theories of Sigmund Freud? Rob Weinberg puts the big questions about history’s biggest thinkers to Professor Angie Hobbs at the University of Sheffield.

Works of art and cultural heritage sites are common casualties in war. In many cases, the sale of plundered treasures has helped finance ongoing conflict. In this episode, two experts examine the history of conflict-driven looting. Along the way, they trace the opaque, unregulated international art market that allows irreplaceable treasures to travel from strife-torn regions to the catalogues of prestigious auction houses. Featured Guests: Amr Al Azm (Professor of History and Anthropology, Shawnee State University) Tess Davis (Executive Director, Antiquities Coalition)

In NT Pod 95, I am in conversation with Ariel Sabar, author of Veritas: A Harvard Professor, A Con Man and the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife. It is an hour and thirteen minutes long: NT Pod 95: Interview with Ariel Sabar, Author of Veritas (mp3)  The book is: Ariel Sabar, Veritas: A Harvard Professor, A Con Man and the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife (New York: Doubleday, 2020) Previous podcasts in this series: NT Pod 87: What is the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife?NT Pod 88: Is the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife a forgery?NT Pod 89: How was the forgery of the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife proved?NT Pod 90: How was the forgery of the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife confirmed?

Kara Cooney, Part 1: Funerary Culture and Royal Power. Kathlyn (Kara) Cooney is professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). In this interview, we discuss her research in funerary culture and the cost of burial for non-royal Egyptians during the New Kingdom.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends war.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 25, 2020

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Sept. 2772 AUC ~ 7 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

MonsterTalk Classic interviews return with a look at robots and automata of the ancient classical world. Adrienne Mayor joins us to talk about her book Gods and Robots. Greek myths, ancient science, and monsters abound.

Just because someone claims to hold the truth doesn’t mean they actually do. On this episode, investigative journalist Ariel Sabar tells us the fascinating story of how a Harvard professor was duped into believing she made a discovery that would turn the Christian world upside down. But as it turns out, truth is not always subjective.

In this episode, we discuss the Second Greco-Punic War (410-406 BC), as hostilities in Sicily draw in Carthage and the Syracusan fleet away from the eastern Aegean and the Hellespont, including Hannibal Mago’s first invasion of Sicily and the destruction of Selinus and Himera, the rebellion of Hermocrates, the rise of Dionysius as tyrant of Syracuse, Hannibal Mago’s second invasion of Sicily and his destruction of Akragas, and the ceasefire which would see Carthage and Syracuse as the two strongest powers on Sicily

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a stormy winter and a shortage of tree fruits.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 24, 2020

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Sept. 2772 AUC ~ 6 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

In 1753, Sir Hans Sloane bequeathed his collection of over 70,000 objects to the nation, founding the British Museum’s collection, and those that would become the British Library and Natural History Museum.  His collection spanned from natural history specimens to ancient sculpture, plants and contemporary 18th-century objects. But Sloane’s collecting is tied closely to colonialism, empire and slavery – his family profited from sugar plantations in Jamaica worked by enslaved people, and some of the objects in his collection were also collected with assistance from enslaved people. So how do we navigate Sloane’s story in the 21st century? Guests Miranda Lowe and James Delbourgo explore Sloane’s life, collecting and legacy with Hartwig Fischer and Sushma Jansari, and examine the role of slavery and enslaved people in his collection and collecting practices. They also consider how museums should respond to these histories and to figures like Sloane.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the deaths of noble youths.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of August 22-23, 2020

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Sept. 2772 AUC ~ 5 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

Maximinus Thrax was an unorthodox Emperor, a man of lowborn status who kept to the frontlines with the military. It was only a matter of time before the Senate threw in with someone more on their level, but their choice, Gordian, would have the shortest rule of any Emperor. Guest: Dr Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

Claudius was a builder and a visionary. Humble and generous. He liked gladiatorial contests a little too much. But then there was his wife. Valeria Messallina. Like Livia, Messallina often gets blamed for some of the deaths that occurred early in his reign.

Kalkriese is an archaeological site in Germany where the Roman army suffered one of its greatest defeats in the Battle of the Teutoberg Forest. It was here where three Roman legions were ambushed by German barbarians, virtually wiped out, bringing an end to the ambition of empire expansion in the area. Guest: Dr Joanne Ball (Battlefield archaeologist, University of Liverpool)

Recap and Q&A of the past 13 episodes

Join this episode to listen in on my discussion with Christchurch College Oxford alumni and all-round boffin, Mr S Hyams, over the biggest questions in Classics…

Was there Mental Illness in the ancient world? What did people think about Suicide or Schizophrenia? How did the philosophies of Epicurus or Hippocrates help? And what can this teach us about Mental Illness today? Michael Fontaine, Professor and…

This episode, we are setting the stage of the epic tale of Hercules/Heracles! With plentiful obscure Disney references, we cover: Ancient Greece, who that Heracles guy is, the Olympic gods, and so much more!

Around this time 2,499 years ago the famous Battle of Thermopylae was raging. But it is important to remember that this clash was not happening on its own. At the same time, to the east of Leonidas’ defence, another battle was underway at sea between Xerxes’ great armada and a much smaller Hellenic fleet plagued with internal problems. This was the Battle of Artemisium, an often-overlooked and overshadowed military encounter of the Persian Wars. Its importance, however, was sizeable. I was delighted to have Dr Owen Rees back on the show to talk through this clash, explaining its significance and how it paved the way for one of the most famous naval battles in history: Salamis. Owen is the author of ‘Great Naval Battles of the Ancient Greek World.’

47 BCE – Veni, vidi, vici.  Julius Caesar was short handed when he felt obliged to deal with the Pontic problem.  Discover how Pontus still caused headaches for the Romans, even after the reign and lifetime of the great Mithridates VI.

Book Reviews

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today with lightning, it portends a massacre..

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxiope ~ Classics in Landscape Mode for August 22, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Sept. 2772 AUC ~ 4 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

This week’s video-based gleanings; kind of quiet …:

Classics Association Northern Ireland

Classics in Color

AIA

Everyday Orientalism

UQ Humanities

Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Center for Hellenic Studies

American Institute for Roman Culture/Darius Arya

Troubadour Theater Company/Getty Museum

Parco Colosseo

Stupid Ancient History

Mythology Manifest

A full conference …

Alia