#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for the Weekend of September 19-20, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 3 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Fresh Podcasts

Medusa fills the imagination with a very particular kind of fascination. Pity for her situation and dread of what she is capable of make her one of the most recognisable figures from Greek myth. She has transcended that context with her story reimagined by the Romans, the artists of the Renaissance, and she continues to excite wonder today. We sat down to talk about Medusa and her representation with the fabulous Liv, host of Let’s Talk about Myths Baby.

In this week’s episode of PillarTalk Will is away in Cyprus on an archaeological dig so in place of him we have this years social secretary and UoM student Flo! We discuss the controversial topic of displaying human remains in different settings and the ethical debate that occurs when we talk about how the remains of ancient people should be treated. Should museums display human remains at all? Is there a justification to display when it is educational? and how do modern humans perceive death and the body? Todays episode includes conversation about Egyptian Mummies, Scientific specimens and modern cultures where death is a crucial part of the community.

King  Ceyx set his ship upon the ocean despite his wife’s warning. Every day,  Queen Alkyone climbed the steps of the temple and begged the gods to  send her husband home to her…

Join in as we look at the culminating event of the decade!  The highlight of these past few episodes we have been hinting at!  It is going to be epic! It is the highlight of the century! I am lying!  But listen to the episode to find out why.

Treb Courie asks, was the iron shank of the pilum designed to be soft and bend easily?

The invasion of Brittania continues. When Plautius has them nearly finished, he sends for Claudius who turns up to take credit for the final blow. The Senate grant him tons of honours as a result of his victory. But he’s more interested in explaining to Romans how an eclipse works.

Persia launches its first invasion against Greece

The year 2020 represents the 2,500th anniversary of three battles which played a major part in shaping the future of the western Mediterranean world: the battles of Thermopylae, Artemisum, and Salamis.

The Emperor Constantine I, better known as Constantine the Great, is one of the most significant emperors in Roman history. His later Christian biographers lauded him as an icon, the man who set in motion Rome’s dramatic transformation into a primarily Christian empire. And yet Constantine’s own beliefs were deliberately ambiguous, as Professor David Potter explained. He learned from Diocletian, he witnessed the mistakes and the successes. He figured out how to heal divisions in the empire, but at the same time restore it to one man rule through blood and battle..

.Book Reviews

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the downfall of a famous man and war.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxiope ~ Classics in Landscape Mode for September 19, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XIII Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 2 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

This week’s video-based gleanings; a busy week means the page will take a while to load:

Lectures and Conferences

Kings and Generals

Satura Lanx

Parco Colosseo

Christian Lehman

ASCSA

Flint Dibble

Invicta

Mythology Manifest

Michael Levy

Center for Hellenic Studies

TED-ed

Pompeii Sites

Ancient History Encyclopedia

Ancient Literature Dude

The Study of Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Olympia Kyklos

Iter Artis

Ancient History Guy

Persika

David Amster

Bettina Joy de Guzman

Digital Hammurabi

Classics in Color

Stupid Ancient History

 

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 18, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XIV Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 1 Boedromion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends both famine and wars.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 17, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XV Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 30 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Fresh Podcasts

Lizzie Rogers joins us to talk all about adventurous women who packed their bags in the 18th Century and decided not to let young men have all the tourist fun.

“The fifteen years of civil war did not produce as much damage as the few seconds did on August 4th.” On the evening of August 4, 2020, Beirut—the capital of Lebanon and one of the oldest cities in the world—experienced a devastating explosion, when more than two and a half tons of ammonium nitrate detonated …

This week’s episode from the History Hit archive features the brilliant Tom Holland telling the myth of Jason and the Argonauts, an epic story of honour, adventure, dangerous women and a golden fleece. Told with wit, verve and passion, this magical tale of the first group of super-heroes will be a treat for all, whether young or old. This was recorded at the 2016 Chalke Valley history festival and first released on the Chalke Valley History Hit Podcast.

More than 1,800 years after Spartacus fought for his freedom, another rebel leader spearheaded the most successful slave revolt in history: the Haitian Revolution. That leader was a man named Toussaint L’Ouverture. This week, we invited Mike Duncan of The History of Rome and Revolutions to help us compare these two revolutionaries and discuss what advice Toussaint L’Ouverture might have had for Spartacus.

Heus, you want to learn Latin? Salve sodalis, you have come to the right place. This is a Latin podcast for beginners. With the series “Litterae Latinae Simplices”, you will set up for a journey into Latin literature, in easy spoken Latin.

Herodian was a Roman historian living and writing during the reign of the Severan dynasty. He is a valuable record of events for some of the most turbulent days of Roman history, and while at times lacking details, he knows what he’s doing with an exciting narrative. Guest: Dr Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life and influence of the most powerful statesman in the new democracy of Athens, flourishing between the Persian and Peloponnesian wars.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of necessities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for September 16, 2020

Hodie est a.d. XVI Kal. Oct, 2772 AUC ~ 29 Metageitnion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

Classicists and Classics in the News

Greek/Latin News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Fresh Podcasts

Andrew Wallace-Hadrill joins us to talk all about Pompeii’s oft-forgotten neighbour.

Lucius Vorenus has a setback in his new career when all his slaves die of the flux. After a brief crisis of identity he re-enlists in the 13th legion. Octavian helps Titus Pullo investigate his suspicions. Attia engages in some light public vandalism. Servilia engages in some light public cursing. Caesar chases Pompey out of Italy. We are also joined by special guest Parvez Qadir, who plays the role of Tanjit.

On this episode of the Peopling the Past Podcast, we catch up with Dr. Katherine Harrington, who currently holds a Visiting Teaching Faculty position at Florida State University and will begin a postdoctoral fellowship at the Research Centre for Anatolian Civilizations at Koç University in Istanbul next year. Join us as we talk about the role of women in the Athenian economy, textile production, and the ever-looming debate over Building Z in Athens (brothel? Tavern? House? Industry?)

In what is a rather unorthodox edition of The Daily Delphi, join myself and Dr Charlotte Goddard for an improvised chat on themes ranging from Renaissance Latin Literature to the toppling of the Edward Colston Statue…

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends successful sprouting of plants, but a lack of fruit.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)