#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 23, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 11 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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OU PhD student Liz Webb talks to James Renshaw from the Godolphin and Latymer school about her research on ‘Thucydides and Audience Sensory Experience in the History of the Peloponnesian War.’ This interview was recorded for the Ancient World Breakfast Club podcast.

Is the age of empires over? And are they always a bad thing? Dominic Sandbrook and Tom Holland explore empires through history, examining the modern assumption that nation statehood is always the better way.

Why and how should we read Plato? Why did Plato write dialogues? Is Plato a friend to democracy? Dr. Marcus Gibson, John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Princeton University’s James Madison Program, joins Madison’s Notes to provide an introduction to Plato in preparation of a series of episodes on individual Platonic dialogues.

Like big brothers and sisters everywhere, Hermes and Athena enjoy scaring their little brother Perseus with tales of warriors and monsters. They also help prepare him for what he must do to save his mom. But to become a hero, he must face Medusa on his own.

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends deformity for humans and destruction for birds.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 22, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 10 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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The life and tines of Seneca – Philosopher, Playwright, Poet and Statesman who operated in the time of emperor Nero. The origins of Roman Tragic drama and the little we know about it’s exponents. The life of Seneca from his birth in Spain and education in Rome. Seneca’s rise to political office. The accession Claudius and the rise of his wife Agrippina and her son Nero. Court intrigues and an eight year exile in Corsica. Rehabilitation and tutor to Nero. Life under Nero and Seneca’s fall from favour and death. An overview of his nine plays.

The second installment in our 11-part series on Plato’s Republic

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Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders, it portend disease-carrying air, but it won’t be fatal.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 21, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 9 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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In 197 AD, the armies of Septimius Severus and Clodius Albinus met at Lugdunum, on the site of present day Lyon. If we believe the numbers given in Cassius Dio, this was the greatest and bloodiest clash between two Roman armies in history. 300,000 soldiers were present in total, according to Dio. The numbers are debated, but nevertheless the titanic scale of this clash in ancient history is clear to see. In this episode Tristan speaks to Dr Jonathan Eaton about the lead up to the battle, how Severus and Albinus went from friends to foes, and whether we can really call this the biggest battle in Roman history. Jonathan is Academic Registrar at Teeside University and author of ‘Leading The Roman Army: Soldiers and Emperors 31 BC – 235 AD’.

600 – 185 BCE – It’s time to bring our story of the Indian subcontinent up to date with particular focus of Chandragupta Maurya, Chanakya and Ashoka the Great, and the emergence of the early Vedic religions.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends abundance.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 20, 2021

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 8 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Let’s talk… about Corinth… why was it so important? What were its contributions? And how did the Corinthians portray Medea?? This week’s Classical Wisdom Speaks episode is with Dr. Amelia R. Brown, Senior Lecturer in Greek History & Language in…

‘Classicist in Transition’, a podcast by GICS Ghent, hosted by Dimitri Van Limbergen and Alison John. In this episode Alison and Dimitri speak about becoming an expert!

Simon and Rachel speak with Natalie Haynes. Following an education as a classicist and a career as a stand-up comedian, Natalie has written three novels—“The Amber Fury”, “The Children of Jocasta” and “A Thousand Ships” (which was shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction in 2020)—as well as two non-fiction books, “The Ancient Guide to Modern Life” and “Pandora’s Jar”. Natalie has also written for publications including the Times, the Independent, the New Humanist, the Guardian and the Observer on a variety of subjects. We discussed the value of classical languages, reinterpreting myths and the performative nature of writing.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends nice breezes.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for February 19, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Mart. 2774 AUC ~ 7 Anthesterion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

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Murray tells us about the development of the Macedonian phalanx.

Sabina bought some much needed legitimacy to the rule of Hadrian. As a grand-niece of Trajan she was an important dynastic link to the previous emperor, and in death Hadrian could deify her, and be the husband to a god. Part VIII of ‘Empresses of Rome’ Guest: Professor T. Corey Brennan (Classics, Rutgers University).

[no description provided … it’s about Aristophanes]

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an abundance of reptiles and worms.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)