#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for May 20, 2021

Hodie est a.d XIII Kal. Jun. 2774 AUC ~ 9 Thargelion in the fourth year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Fresh Bloggery

Blog-like Publications

Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

The chance find of a strange Roman period half lamp in Jerusalem and the even chancier discovery that the other half is in Hungary has shocked the archaeological world. What is this strange light fixture and how can its separation lead to some high-class speculation about lamps, symbolism, and ancient psychology? What is light anyway, and why is it so darned good? Our panelists are incandescent in this episode.

Rome ruled Egypt for several hundred years. Anthropologist, Dr. Anna Lucille Boozer, The City University of New York, joins the show to discuss what life was like in Roman Egypt.

What have the Greek myths ever done for us? Loads, it turns out, as writer, broadcaster, classicist and comedian Natalie Haynes explains to Mickey in this week’s podzine. They chat about how the Classics still resonate, why they’re for everyone, and how the women in Greek myth have been given short shrift by (relatively) modern interpreters. What a surprise, eh? We can all agree that panic attacks are fucking horrible, but they’re still quite often dismissed or lumped in with other mental health issues. Jen chats to mental health advocate Claire Eastham, who has had 371 panic attacks and so is perfectly placed to discuss why they happen and how to deal with them; something she also covers in her new book F**K I THINK I’M DYING.

Fresh Youtubery

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Online Talks and Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends prosperity for those in the East, but for those in the West, not so much.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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