#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 25, 2022

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 24 Mounichion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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In this episode, we bring the Second Punic War to a close as Hannibal tries to conquer southern Italy, while the Scipio and Barcid families clash over control of the Iberian Peninsula. During the Spanish campaigns, Publius Scipio (the future Scipio Africanus) becomes the premier general of the Republic, bringing the fight to Africa itself as he clashes with Hannibal at the legendary confrontation at Zama.

Time for the big one. Cannae is one of the most famous battles of antiquity. Not only did Rome suffer a crushing defeat but the tactics behind the victory have been studied by generals and military tacticians ever since. In this episode I discuss what happened in the lead up to it, trust me there’s a drama at every turn. From dictators to deceptive cattle. Then there’s the battle itself which I try to unpack to see how each side approached it and what tactics were used. Aside from the brutality and bloodshed there’s a lot to get into.

The 23rd of April marks Saint George’s Day – but who are we actually celebrating? Is there any truth behind the myth of the man who slew the dragon and rescued the princess – and where does the Patron Saint of England actually come from? Spoiler alert – it’s not where you think. In this episode Tristan travelled to the Lancashire Archives to talk to Dr Sam Riches, from Lancaster University, about all things Saint George. Religious origins, centuries old cults, and farm animals going on a day out to the local church – there’s more to Saint George than the well known myth.

Does this popular phrase mean what you think it means? Check out the first episode of season 2 of Manic Classics and find out the history of the powerful phrase: love conquers all.

Join hosts Emily Long, Chelsi Slotten, and Kirsten Lopez, as we explore the works and contributions of women archaeologists from the past and present. These are women that inspire not only us, but the field of archaeology as a whole to do better, be better, and create great work.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a year of peace.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 23, 2022

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 22 Mounichion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends  rains beneficial for seeding time

[Sunday] If it thunders today it portends  discord among the powerful and their plots will be revealed.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 22, 2022

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 21 Mounichion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus have secured their alliance against Caesar’s assassins, and since they have control of Rome, it’s time for them to get rid of any competition. Proscribing an enemy means they will likely be executed, and their personal fortunes can be confiscated and put towards paying soldiers – and the second triumvirate make full use of this. Part V of ‘The Liberator’s War’ Guest: Assistant Professor Zachary Herz (Legal Historian, Department of Classics, University of Colorado Boulder).

Fraser Raeburn talks with Jason Steinhauer about how the internet has shaped the consumption and production of historical knowledge, as detailed in Jason’s new book, History Disrupted: How Social Media and the World Wide Web Have Changed the Past. 40 minutes.

Murray is still in New Zealand but has found the time to answer this question from patron of the podcast Chris. ‘How much do we trust Homer? Are there good examples of corroborating accounts that give us the means to verify or put his missives in context?’

The Persian Empire was one of the ancient world’s greatest powers. Historian Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones joins me to discuss the rise, reign, and fall of this massive (and massively misunderstood) empire.

The Persian invasion of 480 BC had now been defeated with the victory over Xerxes land forces on the Greek Boeotian plains outside Plataea. While his navy was destroyed in Persian controlled lands below mount Mycale on the Anatolian coast. The Greeks would continue operations into 479 under Athenian command for the first time, sailing into the Hellespont where Persian influence in the area would be extinguished…

Liv reads the remaining, shorter Homeric Hymns to gods and heroes, translated by HG Evelyn-White. Sing of Aphrodite and Dionysus, Pan and Hermes, Hestia, Athena, Artemis, even the mother of all gods. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it’s a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that don’t have “Liv Reads…” in the title!

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends destruction of/by flies.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 21, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 20 Mounichion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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It’s back to Ovid this week and you’d best hold on to your hypotenuse. Join us for a deep dive into Book 15 of the Metamorphoses where, after a quick “Hello, Numa”, it’s on to a lengthy lecture by Pythagoras (of triangle fame) regarding the dos and (mainly) don’ts of what humans should glut their gobs with. In a word—put down that cheeseburger, because it just might be your uncle Jimmy! What was Numa, the 2nd king of Rome, supposed to learn from this? Is there wisdom here or was Pythagoras just some kind of metempsycho? Would a modern vegan or vegetarian agree with his take? In the meantime, tune in, go easy on the beans and if you encounter a bar on your way to this episode, consider walking around it. Also, Guacaroni and Cheese.

When we think of the modern Mediterranean, delicious and vibrant food is one of the first things that come to mind. But how much has the regional food changed over the last two millennia? In this episode Tristan is joined by host of ‘The Delicious Legacy’ Thomas Ntinas to discuss just how much the food has changed, and helps by providing Tristan with some mouth-watering home made recreations of just what they would have eaten. The importance of fresh produce, who would’ve eaten an extravagant meal just like the one Tristan is served, and the importance of honey and wine, Thom takes us on a flavoursome journey through history.

There is much less scholarly work on the early Roman Republic than there is on periods like the late Republic or early Empire. This is understandable as there are fewer primary sources, and what we have does not always seem quite as reliable. There are still people who have chosen to focus on this era, and one of our major scholarly sources has been the work of Emeritus Professor Tim Cornell…

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss what is reputedly the most performed of all Greek tragedies. Antigone, by Sophocles (c496-c406 BC), is powerfully ambiguous, inviting the audience to reassess its values constantly before the climax of the play resolves the plot if not the issues. Antigone is barely a teenager and is prepared to defy her uncle Creon, the new king of Thebes, who has decreed that nobody should bury the body of her brother, a traitor, on pain of death. This sets up a conflict between generations, between the state and the individual, uncle and niece, autocracy and pluralism, and it releases an enormous tragic energy that brings sudden death to Antigone, her fiance Haemon who is also Creon’s son, and to Creon’s wife Eurydice, while Creon himself is condemned to a living death of grief. With Edith Hall Professor of Classics at Durham University Oliver Taplin Emeritus Professor of Classics, University of Oxford And Lyndsay Coo Senior Lecturer in Ancient Greek Language and Literature at the University of Bristol

In the second of two episodes on the Jewish Revolt, Tom and Dominic discuss the burning of the Temple, Vespasian & Titus’ triumph, and Masada. Why was it such a landmark revolt for both Christianity and Judaism? What happened in its aftermath? And what has its historical significance been in the modern world?

In our last episode we looked at Achilles’ early life and his relationships with the women who crossed his path. In this episode, we follow him to the beach at Aulis—where all the Greek kings and heroes, anyone who was anyone, had gathered at the start of the Trojan War. Achilles left Pyrrha behind, but his time as a dancing girl followed him to that beach. This is where the wind stalled. This is where Achilles first clashed with that titan of fragile masculinity, Agamemnon. And this is where a girl named Iphigenia met her fate.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends good things for crops but war for the state.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for April 20, 2022

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Mai. 2775 AUC ~ 19 Mounichion in the first year of the 700th Olympia

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This episode’s topic is so literally monumental, we brought in three experts to help us bring it to life. We’re going back more than 3,000 years, to New Kingdom Egypt, to visit two of the job sites that contributed to the production of some of the ancient world’s most iconic monuments. We start with the dynamic duo of Dr Maria Nilsson and John Ward, Nat Geo Explorers and archaeologists who have spent over ten years uncovering the secrets of Gebel el Silsila, the little-known quarry site that supplied the stone for pretty much every major temple you’d see along a ‘hit parade’ Nile River tour. Then, joined by Egyptologist Sofia Aziz, we zero in on the Valley of the Kings site, Deir el Medina, where extraordinarily detailed archaeological and historical records reveal the lives of one group of ancient Egyptian construction workers in astonishing detail. Think worker strikes and social media are a modern phenomenon? Think again. As with so many things, it seems the Egyptians did it first. So, let’s tread the dust of two of their most prolific building sites. Like an Egyptian, of course.

Nadia discusses her work on the Iraqi antiquities market of the late 19th and early 20th century. She focuses on two remarkable figures from the trade. Ibrahim Gejou was perhaps the most significant dealer used by European and American collectors. Ferida Antone Shamas is less well-known, but still a fascinating character. Who were they? What was their role in the trade? And what was their motivation?

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends divine anger.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)