#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for December 24, 2019

Hodie est IX Kal. Ian. 2772 AUC ~ 28 Poseideion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

… depending on whether the houseful wakes up early tomorrow or not, there may or may not be a ‘Christmas edition’ of Thelxinoe …

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

Former guests Matthijs Wibier and Christopher Burden-Strevens, prosecco in hand, return to put David in the hot-seat, where he talks about what he’s learned from doing the podcast, why he got into archaeology, the modern reception of Roman Britain, cringing over old Facebook statuses, and why you shouldn’t always listen to your lecturers.

Often neglected in favor of his more glamorous son Alexander the Great, Philip II of Macedon (r. 359 – 336 B.C.) was one of the most important figures of the ancient world. His accession to the throne of a crumbling backwater kingdom would prompt him to not only save Macedon from destruction, but through a series of military and economic reforms, brilliant diplomatic maneuvers, and talented generalship, he would make it into the dominant power of the Greek Peninsula and lay the foundations for Alexander’s conquests and the birth of the Hellenistic Age.

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends civil wars in the city and disease for beasts of the forest.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for December 23, 2019

Hodie est X Kal. Ian. 2772 AUC ~ 27 Poseideion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

In this episode we’re going to be discussing the “Macedonian Phalangite vs Persian Warrior” with Ancient Warfare Podcast regular Murray Dahm, who has literally written the book on the topic.

In this episode, a priest sent to the baths by his doctor finds more than he was expecting at a hot spring full of pagan icons. Uploaded a bit earlier than usual so it would be ready in good time for Christmas, this is a somewhat warmer and fuzzier early Christian ghost story adapted from Gregory the Great, Dialogues, 4.40 and 4.55.

How has what we know of ancient Rome influenced by fascist Rome? Mussolini admired the Rome of the emperors and used it to further his own vision of Italy, changing how we interpret many of the monuments today.

Guest: Associate Professor Flavia Marcello (School of Design, Swinburne University)

Dramatic Receptions

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the outbreak of disease, but it will be harmless.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Weekend Edition for December 22, 2019

Hodie est XI Kal. Ian. 2772 AUC ~ 26 Poseideion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

Classics and Classicists in the News

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcastery

Veronae ningit! Nix cadit de caelo Veronae.

Landscape Modery

Book Reviews

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a hot summer and plentiful crops.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for December 20, 2019

Hodie est XIII Kal. Ian. 2772 AUC ~ 24 Poseideion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

According to Suetonius, Caligula was quite proud of his “adiatrepsia” – shamelessness. He lived in habitual incest with all his sisters and was especially fond of Drusilla. He made her divorce her first husband and marry his friend and lover Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. In 37 he interrupted the wedding of Livia Orestilla so he could marry her himself – and then kicked her to the curb 24 hours later. Then he made Lollia Paulina divorce her husband and marry him – but he tired of her in six months. Then he married Caesonia, “a woman of reckless extravagance and wantonness”. Six months into his rule, Caligula fell seriously ill.  While he was sick in bed, Macro and Silanus apparently prepared for the worst. They started the wheels in motion for Gemellus to be declared the successor.

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a shortage of necessities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for December 19, 2019

Hodie est XIV Kal. Ian. 2772 AUC ~ 23 Poseideion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Classicists and Classics in the News

Fresh Bloggery

Fresh Podcasts

For the fifth time, listeners provide questions and Rhiannon and Matt answer!

With Jasper away, Murray is MC for this episode of the Ancient Warfare Magazine Podcast. He is joined by Marc Marc DeSantis, Mark McCaffery and Lindsay Powell. Taking listener questions they discuss the role of contests and rituals in ancient battles.

Why were Civil War-era female spies so successful in smuggling guns across enemy lines? What secret superpower gave Scythian women an edge in battle? In heavily patriarchal ancient Greece, what made athletic, confident Spartan women so exceptional?

Badass women have existed throughout ancient history. In this bonus AHFG episode, Kate from the Exploress Podcast joins us in a freewheeling conversation that finds those women throughout the ages–from Civil War battlefields to ancient Egyptian bathrooms.

We’ve reached a huge milestone! One hundred episodes is quite something and we’re super chuffed to have made it this far. To celebrate we’ve put together a very special episode for you on the consulship.

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a prolongation of hostilities.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)