#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 26, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Aug. 2774 AUC ~ 17 Hekatombaion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Liv speaks with Kyle Lewis Jordan about the complexities of Hephaestus, both in relation to his impairment and as a god of creation and so much else, in addition to scholarship of disability in the ancient world more broadly. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it’s fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I’m not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing.

Hatshepsut was a female Pharaoh from the 15th century BCE who demonstrated agency and integrity to the customs of Egypt. Egyptologist, Dr Filip Taterka, Institute of Mediterranean & Oriental Cultures of the Polish Academy of Sciences, joins the show to share what’s known about who she was and the life she lived.

Tutankhamun was an Egyptian King of the 18th dynasty who came to rule as a child and lived until approximately the age of 18. British egyptologist, Dr Nicky Nielson, The University of Manchester, joins the show to discuss what’s known about who he was and the life he lived.

Often known as ‘Britain’s first town’, Colchester is a city rich in ancient history and on 24 July 2021, a new exhibition will open at the Colchester Museum revealing more about some of its earliest Roman occupants. Called ‘Decoding the Roman Dead’, the exhibition focuses around cremations found in the area around Colchester dating to almost 2,000 years ago. Thanks to new scientific methods, the team have been able to analyse these burnt remains and find out some astonishing details about who these people were. From gender to pathology to where in the Roman Empire these people came from. To talk all about the new exhibition, and to shine a light on the wealth of information archaeologists can learn from ancient cremations, Tristan chatted to Dr Carolina Lima and Glynn Davis. Carolina and Glynn are two of the curators of the exhibition.

In Carthage, in 203 CE, a Roman noblewoman and her retinue were butchered in an amphitheater. Learn her story, and the earliest history of Christian martyrs.

An informal chat about the emergence and disappearance of the ancient sporting tradition that lasted for centuries called the Olympic Games.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends a period of plenty followed by famine

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 24, 2021

Hodie est a.d. IX Kal. Aug. 2774 AUC ~ 15 Hekatombaion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends possible misfortune for a powerful man.

[Sunday]  If it thunders today, it portends a bad situation for a group of youth and also their crops. It will be a time of disease.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 23, 2021

Hodie est a.d. X Kal. Aug. 2774 AUC ~ 14 Hekatombaion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Roman libraries began being built in the 1st century BCE and held a variety of Latin and Greek texts. Classicist and a co-chair at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Stephanie Frampton, joins the show to share what’s known about early libraries in the City of Rome.

Zoe on patreon asks, ‘we know about the four horned saddles the Roman cavalry used but do we have any idea of what sorts of saddles might’ve been used elsewhere in the ancient world?’

The 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games are finally here, after being delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. From Ancient Greece to when it was reborn in 1896, the tournament has nearly 3,000 years of history. Sports historian, Professor Martin Polley from De Monfort University, joins Dan on the podcast to tell the, sometimes surprising, story of the competition. How did it become the international sporting event it is today? How have the games affected global politics and diplomacy? And how is Shakespeare connected to its history?

When Decius died during a battle with the Goths, the Roman army took it upon themselves to appoint his successor – his remaining general Trebonianus Gallus. Gallus was praised for not beginning a civil war – unusual for the time – but would be unable to lead the empire through the turmoil. Guest: Associate Professor Caillan Davenport (Senior Lecturer, Roman History, Macquarie University/Humboldt Research Fellow, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends the end of dissension among the common people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 22, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XI Kal. Aug. 2774 AUC ~ 13 Hekatombaion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Callirhoe is considered to be the earliest surviving written romance in Western history and it is said to have popularized a lot of the common tropes of the genre that now haunt us mercilessly. However, since neither of us know much about ancient Greek fiction, Dr. Jeremy Swist is here today as our Charon to guide us down this Stygian river of ancient romance! Dr. Swist is also known as the Metal Classicist. He studies classical reception in heavy metal music and teaches Latin and Greek along with Roman and Greek myths and history. He has taught most recently at Xavier University and the University of Texas at San Antonio and is soon to start a new position at Brandeis University in MA.

On the eve of the Tokyo Olympics, we’re turning our attention to another era of athletic competitions: the ancient Olympics. Professors Sarah E. Bond and Joel Christensen join Jonathan to discuss these early games and what they reveal about ancient Greek and Roman politics, religions, gender roles, and more. After you listen, make sure to check out Dr. Bond’s first appearance on the show: Would I Have Been The Toast Of The Ancient Mediterranean? Sarah E. Bond is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Iowa and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Her book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professionals in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press in 2016. Follow her on Twitter @SarahEBond. Joel Christensen is Professor and Chair of Classical Studies and Senior Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs at Brandeis University. He also runs the blog sententiaeantiquae.com and the associated Ancient Greek and Roman (and Cats) Twitter account @sentantiq. He has published introductory books on Homer with Elton T. E. Barker (Beginner’s Guide to Homer, One World, 2013) and Erik Robinson (A Commentary on the Homeric Battle of Frogs and Mice, Bloomsbury, 2018) and recently completed The Many-Minded Man: the Odyssey, Psychology, and the Therapy of Epic with Cornell University Press (2020).

In less than a millennium, Pompeii went from being indigenous, to Samnite, to Roman, and in the 1st century CE, was cataclysmically destroyed by the eruption of a volcano. Professor & chair in the Department of History & Archaeology at Macquarie University, Dr Ray Laurence, joins the show to discuss ancient Pompeii.

A legendary city-state in Ancient Greece, we associate Sparta with fierce warriors in battle. But what about the everyday? In this second episode with Professor Stephen Hodkinson, we discuss the eating habits, training and even kingship of Sparta. Stephen is Emeritus Professor of Ancient History at the University of Nottingham.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today it portends good things for the state but for humans, diseases affecting the head.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for July 21, 2021

Hodie est a.d. XII Kal. Aug. 2774 AUC ~ 12 Hekatombaion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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This week the Vomitorium is graced with the presence of Dave and Jeff’s friend, former colleague, mentor and professor, Dr. Ken Bratt. Join us as Dr. Bratt shares his vast knowledge of the ancient Roman colony of Phillipi–site of game-changing battles, crossroads of culture, and where the first European converts to Christianity (including Lydia) were made. Ken walks us through the archaeological remains, connecting them to biblical narrative and dispelling a few likely legends along the way. Is that really “Paul’s Prison” there in Phillipi? Bonus feature:  learn what shenanigans Jeff got up to as a sophomore on a trip to Greece with Ken in the ‘90s. Also, what can we do to get Dave to loosen up? This episode is packed!

This week’s episode brings together Hannah Greenstreet (right) and Charlotte Vickers (left), respectively the writer and director of the TORCH-funded project Andromeda – a queer retelling of Euripides’ play. The episode was recorded ahead of a full production (27-31 July 2021) at Camden People’s Theatre, as Hannah and Charlotte discuss the project, its process, and the importance of centring queer experience in storytelling. Since 2017, the play has been developed with support from Arts Council England, TORCH Theatres Seed Fund, Camden People’s Theatre, Nottingham Playhouse, the APGRD, Pegasus Theatre and the Oxford Playhouse.

In this episode, Alice and Nicolas interview the editors of Ancient Warfare Magazine – Jasper Oorthuys and Murray Dahm. Founded in 2007, Ancient Warfare examines the military history of many different ancient cultures in Europe, the Middle East and parts of Africa and Asia, with a particular focus on Greece and Rome from around 1200BC to 600AD. It has thousands of readers all around the world – and thousands tune in to the Ancient Warfare podcast. We ask Jasper and Murray what their readers are looking for and what goes into the creation of each issue. That gets us chatting about the enduring appeal of ancient military history, the challenges of reconstructing what ancient warfare was really like, and what we gain from learning about and trying to visualise ancient warfare.

Stefania introduces us to one of the dominant figures of early assyriology–Austen Henry Layard. She guides us through the archival sources that put his famous publications in context, and reveal the man behind the legend.

Same podcast, new name. Welcome to another episode of The Ozymandias Project’s recently renamed podcast, Ancient Office Hours with Lexie Henning! Tuck in your togas and hop aboard Trireme Transit for an exciting new odyssey as our show continues on as Ancient Office Hours. In this episode, we contemplate the lack of access to Egyptology programs, talk about Kara’s research on coffin re-use, explore using the ancient world to help us understand the modern world, and discuss Cleopatra & the aggrandizement of the failures of powerful women in the past and present.

Sonia Zakrzewski joins us to talk all about how you can use the archaeological record to develop a knowledge of disabilities in history.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

if it thunders today, it portends a brief period of disagreement among the common people.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)