#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 31, 2021

Hodie est  pr Kal. Sept. 2774 AUC ~ 23 Metageitnion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Greek calendars, in the first millennium BCE, were plentiful and varied. Professor Alexander Jones, New York University, joins the show to explain ancient calendars in this period and region of the Mediterranean.

The classicist Dr Emily Kneebone talks to me about her recent book Oppian’s Halieutica: Charting a Didactic Epic (published by Cambridge University Press in September 2020). We discuss how Oppian’s overlooked 3,500-line poem from the second century AD provides insights into relationships between people, fish and nature in the ancient world – issues that continue to confront us all today.

What does it mean to be free? In our Season 2 finale episode, archaeologist and historian Dr. Katharine Huemoeller joins the podcast to tell us all about her research on the female, forced, and reproductive aspects of ancient Roman slavery and how manumission and marriage can become intertwined. Join us as we dive into the story of woman named Acte and a cursed grave monument from Rome whose inscriptions reveal some dark secrets about the reality of living as an enslaved – and freed – person in antiquity.

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‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

No entry for today!

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 30, 2021

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Sept. 2774 AUC ~ 22 Metageitnion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Heus, you want to learn Latin? Salve sodalis, you have come to the right place. This is a Latin podcast for beginners. With the series “Litterae Latinae Simplices”, you will set up for a journey into Latin literature, in easy spoken Latin.

The proliferation of the Greek Federal states, those such as Achaean and Aetolian Leagues, was a major political development in the Greek Peninsula during the 3rd century. Despite being in an age of kings, several poleis were able to present a unified front against the Successor dynasties, allowing them to act as allies or rivals depending upon their need. Dr. Elke Close, creator of HellenisticHistory.com, joins the podcast to discuss the significance of the Leagues and how we are able to view them through the lens of those like the Achaean historian Polybius.

After an evidential hiatus of a few hundred years, an alphabet arrived in Greece, and with it, literacy. Dr Adam Schwartz, University of Copenhagen, returns to the show to talk about early literacy in Greece.

This week, Amber tells Anna the story of Nabonidus, King of Babylon, who, mid-kinging, tootled off to the Arabian desert for a decade to worship the moon god, Sin. But is that the whole story? Of course not. Tune in to learn what Nabonidus was maybe really doing out there.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends an outbreak of disease in the city where the thunder is heard.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 28, 2021

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Sept. 2774 AUC ~ 20 Metageitnion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Pompeii presents an opportunity to understand the dynamics of city infrastructure better in the ancient period. Professor Eric Poehler, University of Massachusetts Amherst, joins the show to explore Pompeii’s infrastructure in the later period of its existence.

This week Jeff and Dave may have bitten off more than they can chew as the subject of the day is, well, everything. In the 1st century BC Lucretius sat down and attempted to, in dactylic hexameter mind you, explain the origin of all things without resorting to divine explanations. How would this have played amongst the smart set of his day? And why should we listen to someone who may have bought the farm by overdosing on Love Potion #9? We might better understand all of it with a better grasp of the philosophy Lucretius adhered to—Epicureanism. Hold the chariot, aren’t those the guys who just swan around at cocktail parties and sample overly fancy hors d’oeuvres? We’ll untangle it. Promise. Kinda.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

[Saturday] If it thunders today, it portends both and abundance of crops and the death of cattle

[Sunday]  If it thunders today it portends more of the same.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 27, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Sept. 2774 AUC ~ 19 Metageitnion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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Vercingetorix was a Gallic leader who managed to unite the local tribes and mount a credible defence against Caesar during his campaign in Gaul. While his resistance was ultimately futile, he has become a symbol of French nationalism and a much needed foe to Caesar’s Gallic war commentaries. Part I of ‘Enemies of Rome’ Guest: Associate Professor Rhiannon Evans (Head of Department of Languages and Linguistics, La Trobe University)

Patron of the podcast Ian asks ‘which was the fastest army in the ancient world traveling over land? Herodotus mentions the Spartan relief force that raced to Marathon, travelling around 150kms in 3 days- is this a record?’.

In Greek mythology, the Chimera is a figure that is parts lion, goat and snake. Professor of Classics & Department Chair, Scott Smith, New Hampshire University, joins the show to discuss what the Chimera is in Greek mythology.

Herodotus; The Father of Lies. “Because it is simple and lacking in effort and easily runs over events, has thoroughly deceived many people” (Plutarch, on the Malice of Herodotus) Plutarch would be but one historian to level criticisms at Herodotus from the ancient past all the way through to our times. Often, we see the common title given to Herodotus, the Father of History turned on its head to, Herodotus, the Father of Lies, due to his willingness to include strange and wonderful tales. We will look at a number of aspects that have been used to criticise Herodotus over the ages, with us beginning with the sources he used, were they to be trusted in themselves. As we will discover there is no easy answer to this since Herodotus’ sources would be wide ranging…

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends both wars and treachery.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 26, 2021

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Sept. 2774 AUC ~ 18 Metageitnion in the first year of the 700th Olympiad

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First sharks and now pigs? What’s going on in Iron Age Jerusalem with all these non-kosher species? Were Judeans in the shadow of the Temple noshing on something naughty or are there other explanations? Are there ever! Our panelists’  speculations are unbridled in this laughter filled episode.

After Caesar left Egypt, he invited Cleopatra and her brother/husband T14 (don’t worry, we forget he exists too) to Rome as heads of state. We get a glimpse into the Roman attitudes surrounding womanhood, kingship, and binge drinking (thanks Marc Antony). After Caesar mops up Marc Antony’s mess, proclaimed dictator for life…..

Among the rulers of Ancient Egypt, Cleopatra VII has long held a place in legend, her story having been told in folklore, by Shakespeare and in Hollywood movies. In reality, however, her story remains unfinished. The location of her final resting place remains lost to us. Dr Chris Naunton is back with us to explore the possible answers to this mystery, from Alexandria to Taposiris Magna, join us on this trawl through the evidence of Cleopatra’s final days.

After Alexander III’s death, the relationship that Greek polities had with the Kingdom of Macedon was mixed: some were congenial, some acquiesced, and others outright revolted. Dr Charlotte Dunn, University of Tasmania, returns to the show to discuss what happened in Greece after Alexander III’s life.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it thunders today, it portends war.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)