#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for September 30, 2019

Hodie est pridie Kal. Octobres 2772 AUC ~  2 Pyanepsion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

Apologies for the lack of a weekend edition yesterday and the lateness of today’s ….

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In this episode, we discuss the years 423-421 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the death of Artaxerxes and the succession struggle that ends with Darius II on the Persian throne; the continuation of Brasidas’ Thracian and Macedonian campaign; the ‘Wasps’ and ‘Peace’ by Aristophanes; and the deaths of Brasidas and Kleon during the second battle of Amphipolis, culminating in the “Peace of Nikias” and the end of the Archidamian War

De Bibliotheca audietis Veronensi: quid illic Franciscus Petrarca invenerit, cur sit inter vetustissimas habenda.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it should thunder today, affairs of state will improve.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for September 27, 2019

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Octobres 2772 AUC ~  29 Boedromion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Owen joins David to discuss his PhD on craft-tools from Roman London, including what they tell us about life in the city at the time, the misconceptions we can have about craftsman, particularly concerning how varied their experiences were, and how a tool for calming horses got misidentified as ritual castration implement.

Owen also chats about his recent post-doctoral work on the Roman leather in the Museum of London collection, his experiences working on the famous Bloomberg excavations, and why he wasn’t a fan of the Romans growing up. Additionally, he discusses the importance of finding a balance between work and your other interests, and not expecting too much of yourself, because your mental health should always take precedence over those extra hours you could work.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it should thunder today, powerful men will direct hatred toward themselves and take sides against each other.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for September 26, 2019

Hodie est a.d. VI Kal. Octobres 2772 AUC ~  28 Boedromion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it should thunder today, a corrupt ruler will be felled by divine decision.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thlexinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for September 25, 2019

Hodie est a.d. VII Kal. Octobres 2772 AUC ~  27 Boedromion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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In March 37 CE, aged seventy-seven years, four months, and nine days, of which time he had been emperor twenty-two years, seven months, and seven days, Tiberius Caesar Divi Augusti filius Augustus fell ill and died.

OR DID HE?

Octavian was barely an adult when he arrived in Rome in 44BCE. Two months had passed since his adopted father, Julius Caesar, was murdered by members of the senate who resented his control as dictator. Octavian stood to inherit Caesar’s fortunes, but few could have imagined that he would inherit Caesar’s power.

He would become emperor in 27BCE, reigning as the Augustus and transforming the republic of Rome into an autocratic principate. Under his leadership of forty years Rome would grow in territory, reputation, economy and culture, and change from a city of sun-dried bricks and leave it clothed in marble. How did the young Octavian transform himself into Rome’s first emperor?

Sponsored by the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University. Held at the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne on 23 September, 2019

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it should thunder today, out of civil unrest a tyrant will arise and he will be undone, but the powerful will be destroyed completely with major penalties.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for September 24, 2019

Hodie est a.d. VIII Kal. Octobres 2772 AUC ~  26 Boedromion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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The Vestal Virgins carried out some of the most important rituals in the Roman Empire, and their temple was revered and unique in its structure and function. You can still see the remains of it in the Roman Forum, but as with many Roman buildings there’s less to it than meets the eye.

Guest: Dr Peta Greenfield (Public Historian, co-host of ‘The Partial Historians’)

During the time of Alexander the Great, the city of Athens gave rise to something new in Greek culture. Up to this point, music was seen as subordinate to words; melody and rhythm worked in service to text or “logos.” Around 5th century BCE “The New Music” movement challenged these ideas introducing songs without words, new musical tools like modulation, intense competitions and a new instrument, the cithara. The cithara was a concert lyre with as many as eleven strings. The greatest virtuoso on this new instrument was the famed Stratonicus of Athens; at least that’s how he tells the story.

Candidus nomine et animo, cuias sit cur Veronam petiverit audietis.

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If it should thunder today, it portends a drought. There will be an abundant harvest from the nut trees in late autumn, but they will be destroyed by storms.

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)