Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for August 31, 2022

Hodie est pr. Kal. Sept. 2775 AUC ~ 5 Boedromion in the second year of the 700th Olympia

In the News

In Case You Missed It

Greek/Latin News

Public Facing Classics

Fresh Bloggery

Other Blog-like Publications

Assorted Twitter Threads

Fresh Podcasts

This week Jeff and Dave take a sustained look at an-oft discussed but ill-defined notion: what, if anything, gives people dignity? Drawing on the work of famous, late scholar Charles Trinkaus (The Scope of Renaissance Humanism), the guys trace this notion from Cicero through the Greek and Latin fathers and into the trecento. Thanks to the diligent spadery of Chuck T., you’ll enjoy a who’s who of what’s what when it comes to key themes and ideas surrounding what separates man (and woman) from animal, the noble brute. In the end it all comes down to Petrarch, Ficino, Mirandola, and Peter ‘Et’ Cetera of Chicago fame. The jinx here may be lower than normal, but the substance is swole. Don’t miss it!

Fulvia came from a Roman noble family and is strongly associated with a string of influential husbands, most notably Mark Antony. She was influential and powerful in her own way, and would go on to play an important role in the Perusine War against Octavian. Guest: Dr Rhiannon Evans (Associate Professor in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University).

In Ancient Greece, the incredible athlete known as Theagenes of Thasos was so successful, his legend of being unbeaten followed him into the afterlife. But is it true that even his depiction in a bronze statue fought his battles? In this episode, we talk about the Ancient Greek legend of Theagenes and then play the Quick Quiz with Mindreader, Eric Dittelman!

Fresh Youtubery

Online Talks and Conference-Related Things

Jobs, Postdocs, and other Professional Matters

Alia

Diversions

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

No entry for today …

… adapted from the text and translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

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