#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio For July 23, 2019

Hodie est a.d.  X Kal. Sextilies (Augustas) 2772 AUC ~  22 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

A bit more catching up scattered among the fresh stuff …

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When the members of the Roman senate met they did so in the Curia Julia, an impressively decorated building in a prime position in the forum. It was named for Julius Caesar, and is one of the most intact Roman era buildings in the city today.

Guest: Dr Caillan Davenport (Roman History, Macquarie University)
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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If there is any thunder today, the dissension among the common people will come to an end.

… adapted from the translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 22, 2019

Hodie est a.d.  XI Kal. Sextilies (Augustas) 2772 AUC ~  21 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

Some major catching up …. some more catching up tomorrow I think (it’s been a busy few days in the Classical interwebs)

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Dame Mary Beard, DBE, FSA, FBA is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge. She is the author of multiple books, including Confronting the Classics, and most recently, the manifesto, Women & Power. Dame Mary is a respected blogger and television personality. She is Classics editor of the Times Literary Supplement and a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

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Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If there is any thunder today, it portends good things for the common people, but bad things for those at the top [I very much adapted this one]

… adapted from the translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 18, 2019

Hodie est a.d.  XV Kal. Sextilies (Augustas) 2772 AUC ~  17 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

Apologies for lateness this a.m. … probably will be late tomorrow too!

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Seneca’s Thyestes, probably written around the 50s CE, is one of the most horrifying and influential plays ever written.

When Cleopatra met Julius Caesar, sparks flew. The daring Egyptian queen beguiled the conquering Roman general—and then enlisted him to fight her battles.

Outnumbered five to one in a city full of ancient wonders, Cleopatra and Caesar spent the next ten months barricaded in a luxurious palace while outside, the enemy howled for their blood. The two fought a deadly urban war for Cleopatra’s throne–and both of their survival.

Sejanus decided to remove the next in line of Germanicus’ heirs, Drusus, and finally married Livia Julia, the widow of the other Drusus, son of Tiberius. He also became Tiberius’ official partner in power – in 31CE Tiberius took his fifth consulship, with Seianus as his colleague. But before the year 31 would come to a close, Sejanus and all his family were dead, his statues thrown down, his name erased from the public records.
Book Reviews

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Alia

Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If there is any thunder today,  a crop shortage may come due to wet weather.

… adapted from the translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 17, 2019

Hodie est a.d.  XVI Kal. Sextilies (Augustas) 2772 AUC ~  16 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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While at VidCon this year, we sat down and chatted with a few of our fellow educational YouTubers: The Cynical Historian, Knowing Better, 12tone, and Step Back History. This is a compilation of our discussions about their channels, their reasons for making videos, and their experience of VidCon and its educational companion event, EduCon. If you don’t already watch their videos, we strongly recommend you check them out. Thank you to them all for taking part!

Sermo 97, quo uti conor libro Nicolai Flocchini c.t. “Verba Manent”, sed bonis rationibus.

Mai joins David to discuss her work on outreach, particularly her project on the 4th century Eritrean Gospels from Ethiopia. Mai talks about the importance of broadening our understanding of the ancient world to include regions outside Greece and Rome – the Mediterranean didn’t exist in a bubble, but was well connected to areas like Sub-Saharan Africa, China and India – and she reflects on how such projects encourage diverse participation in Classics by highlighting this inter-connectivity…

Book Reviews

Dramatic Receptions

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Alia

Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If there is any thunder today, a great ruler will come to power.

… adapted from the translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition

#Thelxinoe ~ Your Morning Salutatio for July 16, 2019

Hodie est a.d.  XVII Kal. Sextilies (Augustas) 2772 AUC ~  15 Hekatombaion in the third year of the 699th Olympiad

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The term “Western civilization” has long been a staple of the American Right, but with the recent resurgence of white nationalism, it is having something of a comeback. Glenn Beck and Bill O’Reilly are hosting a two-week Mediterranean “cruise thru history” to “explore the roots of Western civilization.” The Intellectual Dark Web’s Jordan Peterson tells us “The West is Right,” while The Daily Caller and Fox News are busy “celebrating the West.” Neo-Nazi Matthew Heimbach hails “Youth for Western Civilization.” Both the traditional and so-called alt-right ground their worldviews in a fictional moral arc of “The West” that bares little resemblance to reality.

Learning from the past and applying those lessons to the present is a good thing. But in pop political discourse, the Classics have been misused and abused to promote an origin story that never was – a white Greco-Roman world birthing our noble, so-called “Judeo-Christian” American empire to gloss over a history of exploitation, imperialism, slavery and conquest.

On this episode, we’ll explore the right-wing obsession with the ancient world, it’s influence on neoconservative empire-building and alt-right white nationalism alike, and how our common cultural understanding of the ancient world has been perpetually white-washed to promote a clash of civilizations narrative and racist pseudo-science.

We are joined by Dr. Sarah E. Bond, Associate Professor at the University of Iowa, and Dr. Cord Whitaker, Associate Professor at Wellesley College.

Today Jean is joined by ancient history enthusiast and my favourite murder fangirl Harriet Scott (from season one episode one and eight). Harriet brings the true crime genre to antiquity through discussing the various theories and unsolved questions surrounding the death of Cleopatra VIII – lover of Julius Caesar and Marc Antony, ruler of Egypt, and fierce, intelligent woman. Was it suicide or was it murder?

Dramatic Receptions

Professional Matters

Alia

‘Sorting’ Out Your Day:

Today on the Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar:

If there is any thunder today, [something about a king in the east falling in war?] and the hot weather will bring disease.

… adapted from the translation of:

Jean MacIntosh Turfa, The Etruscan Brontoscopic Calendar, in Nancy Thomson de Grummond and Erika Simon (eds.), The Religion of the Etruscans. University of Texas Press, 2006. (Kindle edition)